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Child Study Association of America records

Summary Information
Title: Child Study Association of America records
Dates: 1890-1972  (bulk 1928-1970)
Creator: Child Study Association of America
Extent: 62.5 linear feet
Language: English
Collection Number: sw0019
Abstract:
Records of an association providing education and resources on child development and child rearing for parents and professionals. Also comprises records of predecessor organizations. Includes: minutes, agenda, correspondence, memorandums, financial records, reports and annual reports, transcripts, photographs, newspaper clippings, articles, invitations, programs, press releases, fliers, form letters, promotional materials, and guest books. Includes microfilm of conference proceedings from the 1920s and minutes from 1890 to 1900. Also includes articles, speeches, and correspondence of executive director, Sidonie Matsner Gruenberg, and staff member, Josette Frank. Incorporates papers of two related groups: minutes, correspondence, reports, and chapter records of the Inter-Community Child Study Committee and minutes, correspondence, financial records, and conference files of the National Council on Parent Education.

Repository: University of Minnesota Libraries. Social Welfare History Archives

Access and Use
Acquisition Information:

The records were a gift of the board of directors of the Child Study Association of America in 1967. The initial gift was followed by additional records in 1975. The archives also microfilmed the minutes of CSAA's predecessor organizations and early conference proceedings in 1967.

Access Restrictions:

Open for use in Social Welfare History Archives reading room.

Copyright:

Please contact the Archives for copyright information.

Processing Information:

The Child Study Association of America (CSAA) records were arranged and described as three distinct groups as new materials were acquired by the archives between 1967 and 1975. The initial gift of records that arrived in 1967, a second gift that was received in 1975, and a set of microfilmed minutes and proceedings were described in three separate finding aids. Formerly, patrons had to consult multiple documents in order to obtain complete information on the CSAA records. As part of a project to mount finding aids online, the archives has merged the information about the CSAA records into one comprehensive finding aid. This finding aid contains information regarding the original records accession and the microfilm edition. Information about the unprocessed supplement to the CSAA records will be added at a later date.

Alternate Format:

Microfilm The minutes of Child Study Association of America predecessors are available on microfilm. These consist of minutes of the Society for the Study of Child Nature (November, 1890, to March, 1892) and minutes of the Society for the Study of Child Nature, Chapter I (December, 1896, to December, 1900). Transcripts of proceedings from the following parent education conferences are also available on microfilm: Conference on Parental Education, October 19-24, 1925Conference on Modern Parenthood, October 26-28, 1925Conference on Parental Education and the Public Schools, July 24-26, 1928Child Study Association of American Fortieth Anniversary Conference and Dinner, November 20, 1928Brooklyn Conference on Parent Education, October 22, 1929Manhattan Conference on Parent Education, October 29, 1929Round Table Discussion, April 11, 1930


Arrangement

The portion of the Child Study Association of America records that is described in this guide is organized into seven series:

  • Series1. Predecessor Organizations, 1896-1925
  • Series 2. Administrative and Policy Making Bodies, 1925-1960
  • Series 3. Standing Committees, 1924-1965
  • Series 4. Departments and Programs, 1926-1965
  • Series 5. Staff (including Gruenberg and Frank personal papers), 1904-1965
  • Series 6. Guest Books, Notebooks, Photographs, Scrapbooks, 1903-1954
  • Series 7. Related Organizations, 1925-1949


Historical Note

The Child Study Association of America (CSAA) grew out of the Society for the Study of Child Nature, which was formed in 1888. In 1908, the society was renamed the Federation for Child Study and began to more actively disseminate child development information. During the 1920s, grants from the Laura Spellman Rockefeller Memorial Fund enabled the federation to expand its programs. The organization was formally incorporated and renamed Child Study Association of America in 1924. CSAA continued to provide parental education and consultation services on child development topics through the 1960s, when it began to shift its emphasis to professional training. By the 1970s, CSAA focused almost entirely on training programs for child welfare, child health, and education professionals. A series of mergers and continuing financial difficulties during the 1970s and 1980s, led to the gradual dissolution of the association.

The Society for the Study of Child Nature, was formed in 1888 by five women in order to study children from "the mental, moral and physical view points." At a time when there was little authoritative information about child development, the group drew upon the works of philosophers such as Plato, Rousseau, Spencer, and Adler. Later, the society also studied education and psychology pioneers, including Friedrich Froebel, Maria Montessori, Granville Stanley Hall, and Havelock Ellis. In 1908, the society was renamed the Federation for Child Study to reflect its desire to act as a central agency to facilitate understanding of child development, child rearing, and family life by sharing the experiences of small parent education groups across the country. The federation's study groups incorporated theories derived from modern psychiatry and psychology into their programs, becoming among the first organization to interpret these fields to American parents. The small study group remained central to CSAA's methodology throughout its history. During the 1920s, grants from the Laura Spellman Rockefeller Memorial Fund enabled the federation to expand its programs. The organization was formally incorporated and renamed Child Study Association of America in 1924.

The core of the Association's work was with parents enrolled in study groups under the leadership of a professionally trained staff member. According to the Association, its attitude toward parent education was "a common sense approach to the findings of science." The CSAA studied psychiatry, psychology, and sociology and interpreted "sound and useful" ideas for parents and professionals. In addition to study groups organized at CSAA headquarters in New York City and at private homes in the area, there were a number of groups associated with settlement houses, church and community groups, and housing developments in Harlem and in New York's lower east side. Study groups explored a range of topics including adolescence, discipline, children with physical or developmental disabilities, money, recreation, schools, sex education, sexual behavior, and techniques of leadership for parent education groups.

Another important aspect of the Association's work to disseminate child rearing information was the Program Advisory Service, formerly called the Speakers' Bureau. The service arranged lectures and radio broadcasts by CSAA staff; aided in the preparation of CSAA conferences and symposia; and counseled organizations throughout the United States in the planning of constructive parent-child programs.

The association established committees on children's art and literature. It also instituted bibliography, publications, and radio committees to produce educational and parenting resources. Involving a large number of volunteers, these committees reviewed books for children and adults, prepared exhibits and galleries, presented awards, and prepared materials for publication by CSAA.

In addition to books, manuals, and pamphlets, the CSAA published Child Study , a journal of parent education. In 1923, the association received a small grant from the Laura Spellman Rockefeller Memorial Fund to support dissemination of current thinking and findings concerning child care and family life to member chapters. The result was an eight page mailing, the Federation for Child Study Bulletin, which two years later became the monthly, then quarterly, magazine Child Study . During the summer of 1960, CSAA suspended publication of the journal so that a broader program of publishing books, pamphlets, and leaflets could be instituted.

CSAA appears to have undergone an important shift in focus during the 1960s. Although CSAA continued to provide discussion groups and other programs delivered directly to parents and to publish resources on child development and family life, it increased its professional education and consultation services. It offered education and training programs and resources to professionals in fields related to children and families. It also offered program consultation to private and public agencies. These efforts included several national-level programs. For example, CSAA ran a five year training program through the United States Children's Bureau for nurses on working with expectant parents or parents of young children and a two year program for family case workers on reaching low income families that was sponsored by the Family Service Association of America. The association also provided curriculum and training in parent education and community action to family agency social workers as part of the OEO-funded Project Enable.

By the 1970s, the association was focusing almost entirely on training professionals who worked with families. A description of CSAA's programs from 1969-1970 stated that it was"primarily a training center for the staffs of public and private health, education, and welfare agencies directly serving parents, children, and communities." In 1967, CSAA began a program to provide parental involvement training to Head Start program staff from agencies in the Northeast (Head start regions I and II). Over the next few years, the program expanded to other regions. The training programs were designed to created a "core of well-trained parental involvement specialists" who would take over upon completion of the CSAA program. In 1969, CSAA also ran a program in the South Bronx area of New York City to train social workers, sociologists and doctors to educate parents regarding health services. Another program trained health department educators to work with para professionals who were recruited as part of a manpower training program. The association appears to have been hoping to develop into an accredited educational institution and was exploring steps necessary to achieve that goal. However, ongoing financial problems, including the termination of funding for CSAA to provide Head Start training, interfered with this goal and helped lead CSAA into a series of mergers that eventually resulted in the parceling out or cessation of all of its programs.

In 1972, CSAA formally dissolved and turned over all of its assets to Wel-Met, Inc. In 1973, CSAA merged with Wel-Met to form Child Study Association of America/Wel-Met. Wel-Met had been founded in 1935 by the Metropolitan League of Jewish Community Associations to operate summer camps for urban children. The new organization ran three camps and provided counseling and referral services. It also planned to provide adult education programs in the "moral, mental and physical training and up-brining of children," which appears to have been CSAA's contribution to the partnership. By 1977, CSAA/Wel-Met was plagued with financial problems, partly due to decreased participation in camping programs. The board decided to terminate operations and was exploring plans for handling the organization's remaining assets, including the formation of a capital preservation corporation. It is not clear what became of the plan or whether CSAA/Wel-Met continued to provide any services or simply existed as a corporate entity. However, CSAA/Wel-Met still existed in 1985, when it merged with Goddard-Riverside Community Center in New York. Goddard-Riverside does not appear to have continued CSAA's parent or professional education efforts, and the merger effectively marked the end of what remained of CSAA as a corporate body and the cessation of any of its original programs.


Collection Scope and Content Note

The Child Study Association of America records consist of: minutes, agenda, correspondence, memorandums, financial records, reports and annual reports, transcripts, photographs, newspaper clippings, articles, invitations, programs, press releases, fliers, form letters, promotional materials, and guest books. A portion of the records consists of microfilm proceedings of parent education conferences that were held during the 1920s and early minutes of CSAA predecessors dating from 1890 to1892 and 1896 to 1900. The records also contain the papers of long-time executive director, Sidonie Matsner Gruenberg, and CSAA staff member, Josette Frank. Concentrations of their papers, which include correspondence, speeches and articles, are found primarily in the Study Department records under Series 3, Departments and Programs. Their personal papers are located in Series 5, Staff.

The CSAA records document the association's efforts to promote understanding of child development, child rearing, and family life by interpreting the findings of psychiatry, psychology, educational philosophy, and sociology for parents and professionals. Small group study and discussion were central to CSAA's educational efforts. The records document the activities of individual chapters as well as the work of the Study Group Department. A significant portion of the records delineates work by CSAA's Program Advisory Service and standing committees to produce lectures, radio broadcasts, courses, conferences, symposia, and published resources on child development topics. These records also document work by various standing committees to study and influence children's media, such as books, radio, and comics. Materials dating from 1955 to 1970 reflect the association's shift toward training social workers, Head Start program staff, nurses, and other professionals to work with parents and children.

In addition to documenting CSAA, the records chronicle its predecessors, the Society for the Study of Child Nature (1888-1908) and the Federation for Child Study (1908-1924). The records also provide information on the two related groups: the Inter-Community Child Study Committee, which was organized in 1929 to address the parent education needs of African American communities, and the National Council of Parent Education, which was founded at a CSAA conference in 1925.

Along with the 17 feet of records described in this finding aid, another 45 feet of unprocessed records dating from 1908-1972 is also available and will be added to the online finding aid at a later date. Contact the archives for additional information.

Related Material

Goddard-Riverside Community Center records, Columbia University Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University, New York, NY. Records from the Child Study Association of America are listed under the Predecessor Organizations series.

Unpublished inventories available for all records. In particular, patrons who need information about the 45 feet of unprocessed records dating from 1908 to 1972, should contact the Archives for information about the unpublished inventory of the files.

Subject Terms
Index Terms
  • This Child Study Association of America records are indexed under the following headings in the catalog of the University of Minnesota Libraries. Researchers desiring materials about related topics, persons or places should search the catalog using these headings.
  • Child Study Association of America
  • Society for the Study of Child Nature
  • Federation for Child Study (U.S.)
  • Gruenberg, Sidonie Matsner, 1881-
  • Frank, Josette, 1893-
  • Parent and child--Study and teaching--United States
  • Child development--Study and teaching--United States
  • Child psychology--Study and teaching--United States
  • Parenting--Study and teaching--United States
  • African American parents--Study and teaching
Detailed Description of the Records
 Location  Title
Box 1
Series 1. Predecessor Organizations, 1896-1925 Box 1, Folder 1-5
Note  Series 1, Predecessor Organizations, includes committee minutes, pamphlets, and study group papers of the two predecessors of CSAA: the Society for the Study of Child Nature (folder 1) and the Federation for Child Study (folders 2-5). The minutes and pamphlets delineate the purposes, services, and history of the Society and the Federation. The study group papers record routine conduct of business.
 
Society for the Study of Child Nature, 1907 Box 1, Folder 1
Note Pamphlet summarizing the work accomplished by Chapter I (of the Society) from 1896-1906. Among the authors discussed by the Society were Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Rousseau, and Felix Adler.
Minutes for the Society (1890-1892) and for its Chapter I (1896-1900) are available on microfilm.
 
Federation for Child Study, Historical Materials, 1913, 1923-1925 Box 1, Folder 2
Note Included are pamphlets delineating the purposes, services, and history of the Federation.
 
Federation for Child Study, Program Committee, 1917 Box 1, Folder 3
Note The minutes of the committee include material suggesting an intensive study of psychoanalysis and references to the advisory board’s desires that the Federation deal "with the child as a social factor rather than dwelling on the personal relationship between parent and child."
 
Federation for Child Study, Study Group Chapter 13, Papers, 1914-1924 Box 1, Folder 4 to 5
Note The folder contains annual reports, correspondence, lecture outlines, membership lists, and minutes of the study group. Also included are reports on adolescence, the designated topic of the study group.
Box 1-2
Series 2. Administrative and Policy-making, 1925-1960 Box 1-2, Folder 6-13
Note  Series 2, Administrative and Policy-making, contains annual reports, board of directors' papers, and financial records. Reports to the board by executive directors, Sidonie M. Gruenberg and Gunnar Dybwad, are also included.
Box 1
Board of Directors, Correspondence and Papers, 1929-1959 Box 1, Folder 6
Note Included are an agenda of a board meeting, a memorandum on policies, sex education material, and the minutes of a joint meeting of the budget committee and the board publications committee. Also included is correspondence re the relocation of CSAA headquarters and a letter re financial matters.
 
Board of Directors, Papers, 1954, 1957 Box 1, Folder 7
Note Material re proposals for a CSAA television committee and a CSAA-sponsored film on reading problems.
 
Annual Reports, Programs, 1925-1934 Box 1, Folder 8 to 9
Note Pamphlets delineating the functions performed by and the services provided by CSAA.
 
Executive Director Reports, Sidonie M. Gruenberg, 1936-1937 Box 1, Folder 10
Note Reports to the board re CSAA programs.
 
Executive Director Reports, Gunnar Dybwad, 1951-1952 Box 1, Folder 11
Note Includes material emphasizing areas of particular concern to the director during his first year in office: the schism between old and new staff members, "the desperate financial situation" of the Association, and the bookkeeping and filing systems.
Box 2
Interim Reports, 1928-1930 Box 2, Folder 12
Note Quarterly reports prepared by the staff for the board of directors and the advisory board. Also included are reports on fiscal year 1928-1929 and on various staff activities.
 
Financial Records, 1929, 1956-1960 Box 2, Folder 13
Note Routine material re financial matters.
Box 2-25
Series 3. Standing Committees, 1924-1965 Box 2-25, Folder 14-252
Note  Series 3, Standing Committees, includes papers of CSAA's committees: art, bibliography, children's book, pamphlet, publications, radio, research, and summer play schools. The Children’s Book Committee and its Comics Subcommittee records reflect the concerted effort to define and promote “good books” for children. The Publications Committee records deal with material published by the Association, including files on individual authors, particularly Sidonie Gruenberg. The Radio Committee records deal with efforts to evaluate and shape socially constructive radio programming for children as well as parent education offerings.
 
Art Committee  
Box 2
Committee records, 1932-1934 Box 2, Folder 14
Note Material re temporary exhibits, a permanent gallery, and a summary of the committee’s activities.
 
Bibliography Committee  
Box 2
Minutes, 1930-1933 Box 2, Folder 15
Note In addition to discussions of books reviewed by committee members for possible inclusion in the CSAA library or on CSAA booklists, there are references to establishing formal guidelines for reviewing books.
 
Notebook, 1924-1944 Box 2, Folder 16
Note Contains booklists indicating the disposition of books reviewed by the committee.
 
Booklists and Book Reviews, 1932-1943 Box 2, Folder 17
Note Includes lists of inexpensive books for children, booklists for parents and teachers, and book reviews by committee members.
 
Book Reviews, 1944-1959 Box 2, Folder 18 to 21
Note Reviews of books for possible inclusion in the CSAA library or on CSAA booklists. Also included are reviews from journals, magazines, and newspapers.
Box 3
Book Reviews, 1944-1959 Box 3, Folder 22 to 29
Note Reviews of books for possible inclusion in the CSAA library or on CSAA booklists. Also included are reviews from journals, magazines, and newspapers.
Box 4
Book Reviews, 1944-1960 Box 4, Folder 30 to 36
Note Reviews of books for possible inclusion in the CSAA library or on CSAA booklists. Also included are reviews from journals, magazines, and newspapers.
Box 5
Book Reviews, 1944-1961 Box 5, Folder 37
Note Reviews of books for possible inclusion in the CSAA library or on CSAA booklists. Also included are reviews from journals, magazines, and newspapers.
 
Children’s Book Committee  
 
Minutes and reports  
Box 5
Minutes, Annual and Interim Reports, 1930-1963 Box 5, Folder 38
Note Committee discussions focus not only upon routine matters such as awards, booklists, and exhibits, but also upon such topics as the purpose of the committee; what constitutes a "good book"; the problem of instilling an interest in "fine things" while allowing for a child’s freedom in reading; and the necessity of enlisting the aid of a psychologist to help committee members better understand the dynamics of child development in relation to a child’s reading needs and interests.
 
Committee Correspondence,  
Box 5
Correspondence, 1933-1955 Box 5, Folder 39 to 46
Note Correspondence re routine committee matters (e.g., awards, book fairs, booklists, child reading problems, and encyclopedias) comprises the major portions of folders 39 to 46. Also includes correspondence re racial and cultural problems, including material from: Eduard C. Lindeman of the Advisory Committee to Intercultural Workshop, Everett Clinchy of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, the Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith, the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, and the Service Bureau for Intercultural Education (folder 40). Other correspondents include educators, libraries, and publishing houses (passim); the American Federation of Teachers and American Sunday School Union (folder 40); Brooks Atkinson, Pearl Buck, and Dorothy Canfield Fisher (folder 41); the Scottish Council for Research in Education (folder 4l); General Board of Education of the Methodist Church (folder 43); Dr. Martha Eliot of the United States Children’s Bureau and the Metropolitan New York Coordinating Council for Educational TV (folder 44).
 
Correspondence, 1956-1961 Box 5, Folder 47-56
Note Folders 47 to 56 contain not only routine correspondence but also letters from or pertaining to the following individuals, organization or subjects: Downtown Community School (folders 47-48); CSAA’s Latin American booklist, International Reading Association, National Safety Council, and the National Social Welfare Assembly (folder 49); Association for Family Living, Bureau of Applied Social Research of Columbia University, and Alice Pollitzer of the Encampment for Citizenship (folder 50); National Conference of Christians and Jews and the World Federation for Mental Health (folder 51).
Box 6
Correspondence, 1956-1961 Box 6, Folder 48 to 55
Note Folders 47 to 56 contain not only routine correspondence but also letters from or pertaining to the following individuals, organization or subjects: Downtown Community School (folders 47-48); CSAA’s Latin American booklist, International Reading Association, National Safety Council, and the National Social Welfare Assembly (folder 49); Association for Family Living, Bureau of Applied Social Research of Columbia University, and Alice Pollitzer of the Encampment for Citizenship (folder 50); National Conference of Christians and Jews and the World Federation for Mental Health (folder 51).
Box 7
Correspondence, 1956-1961 Box 7, Folder 56
Note Folders 47 to 56 contain not only routine correspondence but also letters from or pertaining to the following individuals, organization or subjects: Downtown Community School (folders 47-48); CSAA’s Latin American booklist, International Reading Association, National Safety Council, and the National Social Welfare Assembly (folder 49); Association for Family Living, Bureau of Applied Social Research of Columbia University, and Alice Pollitzer of the Encampment for Citizenship (folder 50); National Conference of Christians and Jews and the World Federation for Mental Health (folder 51).
 
Crowell Anthology  
Box 7
First Crowell Anthology, 1945-1947, 1955 Box 7, Folder 57 to 60
Note Material generated by the anthologizing of the Read-to-Me-Storybook , a collection of preschool stories. In addition to correspondence between the committee and its publisher, Thomas Y. Crowell, Company, the folder contains correspondence with authors and publishing companies re reprint permission rights, compilations of prospective titles for the anthology, Sidonie Gruenberg’s forward for the collection, and the manuscripts for the anthology.
 
Correspondence and Papers, Second Crowell Anthology, 1948-1949 Box 7, Folder 61 to 62
Note Material re the Read-Me-Another Story anthology includes correspondence with authors, publishers, and the Thomas Y. Crowell, Company. Committee minutes, the introduction, and the manuscripts are included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, Third Crowell Anthology, 1949-1951 Box 7, Folder 63 to 64
Note Correspondence and working papers re the Read-Me-More-Stories anthology. The preface, rejected manuscripts, and the table of contents are among the papers.
 
Correspondence and Papers, Fourth Crowell Anthology, 1948-1954 Box 7, Folder 65 to 66
Note Routine material re the Holiday Storybook for ages 6 to 8 includes correspondence with authors, illustrators, and publishing companies; lists of possible titles; the forward; and the manuscripts. Also included is an invitation to Pearl Buck to submit an Armistice Day story, an idea she rejected.
Box 8
Correspondence and Papers, Fourth Crowell Anthology, 1948-1954 Box 8, Folder 67
Note Continued from previous folder
 
Correspondence and Papers, Fifth Crowell Anthology, 1954-1955 Box 8, Folder 68 to 69
Note In addition to routine material stemming from the anthologizing of the Read-to-Yourself Storybook for ages 7 to 9, there is correspondence re the advisability of substituting African American characters for white ones in some of the stories.
 
Correspondence and Papers, Sixth Crowell Anthology, 1954-1956 Box 8, Folder 70 to 71
Note Papers related to the collecting of manuscripts for the More-Read-to-Yourself Stories for ages 7 to 10, an anthology on fun and magic.
 
Correspondence and Papers, Seventh Crowell Anthology, 1957-1958 Box 8, Folder 72 to 73
Note Material stemming from the anthologizing of the Fairy Tale Anthology for ages 8 to 11, including correspondence, the introduction, and rejected manuscripts.
 
Correspondence and Papers, Eighth Crowell Anthology, 1959-1966 Box 8, Folder 74 to 75
Note Material generated by the anthologizing of the Read-to-Me-Again collection for preschool children.
 
Correspondence and Papers, Ninth Crowell Anthology, 1962-1964 Box 8, Folder 76 to 77
Note Includes papers related to the anthologizing of the Now You Can Read to Yourself Storybook for ages 6 to 7.
Box 9
Correspondence and Papers, Tenth Crowell Anthology, 1963-1964 Box 9, Folder 78 to 79
Note Material regarding the unpublished tenth anthology, including manuscripts on famous Americans such as Nellie Bly, Benjamin Franklin, Albert Michelson, F. W. Woolworth, and Peter Zenger.
 
Correspondence and Papers, Eleventh Crowell Anthology, 1965 Box 9, Folder 80 to 81
Note Includes material generated by the anthologizing of the City Reading Book .
 
Miscellaneous Correspondence and Papers, Crowell, 1950-1960 Box 9, Folder 82
Note Folder includes an analysis of anthology sales through 1960, rejected manuscripts, and committee advice to Crowell on non-CSAA material.
 
Whitman Anthology  
Box 9
Correspondence and Papers, First Whitman Anthology, 1945-1947 Box 9, Folder 83 to 84
Note In addition to routine material ensuing from the anthologizing of Children's Anthology for ages 5 to 8, there is a request for stories involving African American children and references to the desirability of seeking chain store circulation.
 
Correspondence and Papers, Second Whitman Anthology, 1945-1950 Box 9, Folder 85 to 87
Note Material relating to the anthologizing of Best Loved Stories for ages 4 to 8 includes lists of prospective stories, table of contents, and manuscripts. Also included is correspondence re the delay of publication because of the short supply of paper.
Box 10
Correspondence and Papers, Second Whitman Anthology, 1945-1950 Box 10, Folder 88
Note Material relating to the anthologizing of Best Loved Stories for ages 4 to 8 includes lists of prospective stories, table of contents, and manuscripts. Also included is correspondence re the delay of publication because of the short supply of paper.
 
Correspondence and Papers, Third Whitman Anthology, 1945-1947, 1954 1965 Box 10, Folder 89 to 91
Note Folders include correspondence and papers stemming from the anthologizing of Whitman’s Christmas Anthology . In addition to correspondence with Mildred Howells, the daughter of William Dean Howells, the folders contain letters re the possible consequences of using a children’s story which depicts a "good time" in Russia and correspondence re attracting a new children’s market through chain store outlets.
 
Correspondence and Papers, Fourth Whitman Anthology, 1947-1948 Box 10, Folder 92
Note Material generated by the anthologizing of the Dog Anthology for ages range 7 to 10.
 
Committee Papers,  
Box 10
Papers, 1927-1935 Box 10, Folder 93
Note In addition to articles on children’s reading and on the encyclopedia "racket," there are reports on the objectives of the committee in relation to the listing of books, definition of what constitutes a "good" book, permanent values of fairy tales, and criteria for the selection of children’s books.
 
Papers, 1941-1945 Box 10, Folder 94
Note Attendance lists, committee membership roster, press releases, and a summary of a panel discussion on the future of children’s books. Also included are the minutes of a meeting re the formation of a juvenile books committee of the Writers’ War Board. Among the organizations represented were CSAA, Bureau for Intercultural Education, National Council of Women, and the Writers’ War Board.
 
Papers, "Children of Norway,’ 1945-1947 Box 10, Folder 95
Note Material re a CSAA-sponsored project for a "Little Library About the U.S.A. for the Children of Norway." This project was part of a comprehensive campaign (organized by the Women’s Council for Post-War Europe) to rebuild destroyed libraries.
 
Papers, 1946-1949 Box 10, Folder 96
Note Includes memoranda from the board of directors re the use of the CSAA name in endorsements, material re the review of children’s films, transcript of a discussion on the values and dangers of fairy tales, and a discussion re a booklist about America for war refugee children.
 
Papers, 1950-1951 Box 10, Folder 97
Note In addition to advertising material, newspaper clippings and a chart comparing encyclopedia sets, the folder contains a transcript of a panel discussion on the reluctant reader and a proposal for wider distribution of CSAA booklists.
 
Papers, 1952-1953 Box 10, Folder 98
Note Articles on children’s reading, clippings, material from other organizations (e.g., Association for Childhood Education International, Children’s Book Council, and the National Citizens Committee for Educational .Television), list of recipients of the committee award, and a list of Child Study articles on children’s books from 1946 to 1953. Also included are memoranda between Josette Frank and Gunnar Dybwad re the mechanics of publishing a booklist and CSAA’s isolationist reputation.
 
Papers, 1954 Box 10, Folder 99
Note Folder includes brochures, circulars, clippings, memoranda, reprint articles on educational television, and a committee proposal for a paperback book entitled Basic List of Children’s Books .
Box 11
Papers, 1955 Box 11, Folder 100
Note Material re Child Study articles written by committee members, memorandum re Whitman anthologies, minutes of a meeting on public relations, newspaper clippings, and a program from a Progressive Education Association conference on international education.
 
Papers, 1956-1963 Box 11, Folder 101
Note In addition to circulars and newsletters, the folder contains the finished proposal for a Basic List of Children’s Books , a list of articles written by committee members from 1924 to 1956, and material re the transfer of the CSAA Children’s Book Collection to the Pratt Institute Library.
 
Papers, undated Box 11, Folder 102
Note Routine material includes clippings, list of committee members, lists of outstanding books, memoranda, press releases, and form letters to new members. Also included are forwards and introductions to books edited by the committee and notes pertaining to the wider distribution of committee material.
 
Articles on Reading, 1927-1951 Box 11, Folder 103
Note Resource materials selected from the following sources: Association for Arts in Childhood, Bank Street Schools, Louise Seaman Bechtel, University of Chicago Library, Child Study , and the International Council for the Improvement of Reading Instruction.
 
Annual Book Awards  
Box 11
Book Awards, 1942-1947 Box 11, Folder 104
Note Material arising from the presentation of an annual award for books dealing with "the realities of contemporary life," e.g., anti-semitism, the problems of Japanese-Americans during World War II, racial attitudes, etc. Correspondents include major publishing houses, newspapers, Eduard Lindeman, Eleanor Roosevelt, National Conference of Christians and Jews, and the Writers’ War Board.
 
Book Awards, 1948-1963 Box 11, Folder 105 to 107
Note Correspondence and papers generated by the presentation of the annual book award includes a list of award winners from 1943 to 1958 and a description of the criteria used and the selection process. Other than publishing houses and newspapers, correspondents include Pearl Buck (1948) and Eleanor Roosevelt (1950), both of whom were recipients of the award.
 
Children's Book Exhibits  
Box 11
Book Exhibits, 1953-1957 Box 11, Folder 108
Note Correspondence and guest lists re school exhibits and parties are included.
 
Book Exhibits, 1957-1963 Box 11, Folder 109
Note Correspondence, minutes, and questionnaires re a mobile children’s book exhibit.
 
CSAA Booklists  
Box 12
Booklists, 1929-1937 Box 12, Folder 110
Note Booklists re art, books of the year for children, children in foreign lands, inexpensive books, informational books for a boy of ten, nature study, New York City, Scandanavia, and summer play school.
 
Booklists, 1942-1946 Box 12, Folder 111
Note In addition to material re CSAA booklists, the folder contains booklists published by the American Library Association, Association of the Junior Leagues of America, Cleveland Public Library, and the New York City Public Library.
 
Booklists, 1946-1960 Box 12, Folder 112
Note Material generated by the compilation of CSAA booklists on the following topics: books for babies, children’s emotional adjustments, intergroup relations, Jewish cultural books, and lists for the Play Schools Association.
 
Booklists: "The American Scene, Past and Present, In Books for Young People," 1947 Box 12, Folder 113
Note Correspondence and papers relating to the compilation of the booklist including a memo re the structure of, need for, and aims of the project. Other material relates to the search for funds from both foundations and commercial institutions.
 
Booklists: "Bible Stories and Books About Religion for Children," 1948-1956 Box 12, Folder 114
Note In addition to copies of the CSAA booklist and similar non-CSAA lists, there is correspondence with religious institutions re books intended for inclusion on the booklist. Also included is correspondence re the value of the list, criticism of its content, and material re an exhibit of Biblical and religious books
 
Booklists: Encyclopedias, 1950-1957 Box 12, Folder 115
Note Material re encyclopedias and book sets for children.
 
Booklists: "Latin America in Books for Boys and Girls" 1954-1957 Box 12, Folder 116 to 117
Note Correspondence arising from the compilation of a children’s booklist about Latin America. Organizations and individuals include the American Red Cross, Bureau of Inter-American Affairs of the U.S. Department of State, Organization of American States, Pan American Union, Puerto Rican Office of Education, and Nelson Rockefeller. Also included is correspondence re the publishing of the booklist in a Pan American Union periodical.
 
Booklists: "Latin America in Books for Boys and Girls" 1957 Box 12, Folder 118
Note Correspondence re celebration of publication of the booklist.
 
Booklists: "Latin America in Books for Boys and Girls," Reviews, 1952-1957 Box 12, Folder 119
Note Committee members’ reviews of books suggested for possible inclusion on the booklist.
Box 13
Booklists: "Latin America in Books for Boys and Girls" 1953-1955 Box 13, Folder 120
Note In addition to the CSAA booklist, the folder contains CSAA publicity for the booklist and English and Spanish language newspaper clippings.
 
Booklists: "Latin America in Books for Boys and Girls" 1956-1957 Box 13, Folder 121-122
Note Materials relating to the CSAA project include bulletins, and pamphlets from the New York City Board of Education Committee on Inter-American Cooperation, Organization of American States, and the Pan American Union. Also included is material re Pan American Day.
 
Booklists: "Let Them Face It: Today’s World in Books for Boys and Girls," 1944-1948 Box 13, Folder 123
Note Material generated by compilation of a list of books which dealt with the problems of assimilation of foreigners into the American culture, race prejudice, social and economic differences, and "the translation of democratic ideals into everyday terms."
 
Booklists: Two to Six , Correspondence and Papers, 1946-1947 Box 13, Folder 124
Note Booklists for a magazine for parents of young children.
 
Consultants  
Box 13
Association Press, 1960-1964 Box 13, Folder 125-127
Note Material generated by CSAA’s cooperation with the Association Press of the YMCA in conjunction with the publication of six children’s books.
 
Thomas Alva Edison Foundation, 1955 Box 13, Folder 128
Note In addition to correspondence re a Foundation-sponsored conference on youth, the folder contains programs, transcripts of speeches, and material re the Edison Foundation Awards in Mass Media. Also included is material re the committee’s participation in recommending awards for children’s books. Charles Edison is among the correspondents.
Box 14
Thomas Alva Edison Foundation, 1956-1964 Box 14, Folder 129-131
Note Material re the Edison Foundation’s children’s book award. Charles Edison is among the correspondents.
 
Committee Scrapbook  
Box 14
Scrapbook, 1928-1933 Box 14, Folder 132
Note Articles re children’s reading; booklists on the Bible, nature, New York City, science, and travel; and information re children’s magazines.
 
Scrapbook, 1933-1950 Box 14, Folder 133
Note The folder contains booklists, Child Study articles, a Dorothy Canfield Fisher speech, press releases, and a summary of a panel discussion on the future of children’s books. Also included are transcripts of speeches from a committee conference on "America in Books for Young People."
 
Scrapbook, 1940-1945 Box 14, Folder 134-135
Note CSAA annual reports, booklists, clippings re committee activities, press releases, and a survey on comics are included. An article by Josette Frank entitled "The People in the Comics" is also included.
 
Scrapbook, 1951-1958 Box 14, Folder 136
Note Includes CSAA booklists and pamphlets, criteria for selection of books for CSAA lists, encyclopedia information, exhibit photographs, newspaper clippings, press releases, and reviews.
Box 15
Scrapbook, 1951-1958 Box 15, Folder 137
Note Continued from previous folder.
 
Comics Subcommittee  
Box 15
Subcommittee on Comics, Correspondence, 1941-1947 Box 15, Folder 138
Note In addition to material re the formation of the subcommittee, the folder contains correspondence with comic publishers, Chautauqua, Clifton Fadiman of the Writers’ War Board, National Society for the Prevention of Blindness, and the Parents’ Institute. Also included is material stemming from Josette Frank’s survey of comics and her subsequent justification and defense of her survey.
 
Subcommittee on Comics, Correspondence, 1948-1949 Box 15, Folder 139
Note Included are exchanges of letters between Josette Frank and the Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith, Edwin Lukas of the Society for the Prevention of Crime, State Charities Aid Association, and Dr. Frederick Wertham. Material re a panel discussion on "Comics, Radio, Movies and Children" is also included.
 
Subcommittee on Comics, Correspondence, 1950-1959 Box 15, Folder 140
Note Material re the appearance of CSAA executive director, Gunnar Dybwad, before the U.S. Senate Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency. Correspondents include Bertram Beck, Board of Education of the Methodist Church, Church Peace Union, U.S. Representative Carl Elliot, Dorothy Kilgallen, National Association for Better Radio and Television, New York State Youth Commission, and the Religious Education Association.
 
Subcommittee on Comics, Papers, 1942-1948 Box 15, Folder 141
Note Includes articles by Josette Frank, lists of comic publishers, review forms for Frank's survey of comics, subcommittee membership list, and a bibliography committee report on comics.
 
Subcommittee on Comics, Papers, 1949-1956 Box 15, Folder 142
Note Material arising from a CSAA panel discussion ("What About the Comics"), including the speaker list and the transcript of the meeting. Also included is material pertaining to the appearance of Gunnar Dybwad before the U.S. Senate Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency.
 
Subcommittee on Comics, Resource File, 1941-1950 Box 15, Folder 143
Note Articles, pamphlets, and reports from sources such as the Association of Comics Magazine Publishers, Chicago Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women, National Social Welfare Assembly, and the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness.
Box 16
Subcommittee on Comics, Resource File, 1954-1960 Box 16, Folder 144
Note Articles, pamphlets, and reports from sources such as the American Civil Liberties Union, Comics Magazine Association, Thomas Alva Edison Foundation, Institute of Child Study, and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
 
Subcommittee on Comics, Clippings, 1948-1955 Box 16, Folder 145 to 147
Note Articles and comics from newspapers, magazines, and journals.
 
Subcommittee on [Phonograph] Records, 1946-1959 Box 16, Folder 148
Note The folder contains requests for a list of recommended records for children, material re a committee luncheon, and memoranda re a joint project with the Columbia Record Company.
 
Pamphlet Committee  
Box 16
Pamphlet Committee, 1957-1963 Box 16, Folder 149
Note Minutes and memoranda re changes in the publication policies of CSAA.
 
Publications Committee  
Box 16
Minutes, 1954-1962 Box 16, Folder 159
Note Included are discussion re a CSAA pamphlet on sex education, the combining of the Publications Committee with the Public Relations committee, the possibility of reorganizing or discontinuing Child Study , Russell Sage grant to CSAA, and the rejection of an idea for a pamphlet on teenage drug addiction.
Box 17
Budgets, 1953-1961 Box 17, Folder 151 to 152
Note Routine budget material for both the committee and the Association. Also included is a proposed budget re the management of CSAA publications by the Mental Health Materials Center.
 
Papers, 1957-1962 Box 17, Folder 153
Note Includes material re publication projects, the Mental Health Materials Center, reports to the board publications committee, and the reactivation of the Pamphlet Committee.
 
Authors  
Box 17
Prospective Authors, 1953-1960 Box 17, Folder 154
Note Letters from authors offering manuscripts, editorial services, etc. for CSAA publications.
 
Aline B. Auerbach, 1959-1963 Box 17, Folder 155
Note Articles, pamphlets, and speeches prepared by the director of parent group education of CSAA. Among the topics discussed are discipline, parent education, and the training of professionals for work in family life education.
 
Dr. Philip Barba, 1959-1960 Box 17, Folder 156
Note Material re the pediatrician’s role in the family.
 
Barbara Biber, 1954-1963 Box 17, Folder 157 to 159
Note Includes transcripts of speeches and material re a pamphlet on the middle years of childhood.
 
Frank H. Bowles, 1958-1959 Box 17, Folder 160
Note An article re college admission submitted by the president of the College Entrance Examination Board.
Box 18
Orville Brim, 1956, 1959 Box 18, Folder 161
Note Includes a brief historical sketch re the changes in child-rearing advice given to American parents. Also included is an article re the relation of values and social structures to life planning.
 
A. D. Buchmueller, 1955, 1960 Box 18, Folder 162
Note An article by the CSAA executive director re the place of values in parent education.
 
Dorothy Cohen, 1959-1961 Box 18, Folder 163
Note Material re children and school.
 
Karl Deutsch, 1959 Box 18, Folder 164
Note Transcript of a speech by Deutsch, a professor of political science at Yale, on the nature of growth.
 
Edmond F. Erwin, 1958-1959 Box 18, Folder 165
Note An article by a medical psychologist re homework and the parent.
 
Feldman,, undated Box 18, Folder 166
Note Material re the sexual behavior of adolescents.
 
Selma Fraiberg, 1957-1962 Box 18, Folder 167
Note Included is an article entitled "Mass Media--A New Kind of Schoolhouse for Our Children."
 
Josette Frank, 1932-1957 Box 18, Folder 168
Note Material for CSAA pamphlets, Child Study . Federal Probation , McCall’s , Progressive Education , and Woman’s Home Companion . Topics discussed include children’s reading, comics, radio, and television. Also included is a CSAA pamphlet re Native American girls (heritage, needs, and opportunities) prepared at the request of the Commissioner of American Indians.
 
E. Z. Friedenberg, 1960 Box 18, Folder 169
Note Transcript of a speech on the effect of the mass media on adolescence.
 
Maurice Friend, 1960 Box 18, Folder 170
Note The folder includes a lecture bearing upon parents’ contributions to a child’s struggle for independence.
 
Roma Gans, 1962 Box 18, Folder 171
Note Material re a child’s home library.
 
Irving Gitlin, 1960 Box 18, Folder 172
Note Material re television and children.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: Children and Money, 1929-1935 Box 18, Folder 173
Note Includes articles published in Child Study , Delineator , and the New Era . Also included are articles written in collaboration with Benjamin G. Gruenberg.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: Comics, 1948 Box 18, Folder 174
Note Articles re comics published in the Journal of Educational Sociology and Woman’s Day .
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: Parent Education, 1926-1940 Box 18, Folder 175 to 177
Note Topics considered include child welfare, study groups, and the objectives of parent education.
Box 19
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: Parent Education, 1926-1940 Box 19, Folder 178 to 180
Note Continued from previous folder
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: Radio, 1934 Box 19, Folder 181
Note Material centering on radio and children. Included is Gruenberg’s pamphlet for the Radio Institute of the Audible Arts.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: Redbook Magazine , 1942-1943 Box 19, Folder 182
Note Material re articles Gruenberg desired to publish.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: School and Home, 1934-1945 Box 19, Folder 183
Note Articles re the importance of continuity between the school and home in a child’s education.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: Sex Education, 1925-1943 Box 19, Folder 184
Note Material re the publication of articles on sex education in periodicals such as the Journal of Educational Sociology and New Era .
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: Sons and Daughters , 1929-1950 Box 19, Folder 185 to 187
Note Material re a book on intra-familial relationships. Included are manuscripts of chapters.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: True Confessions , 1943-1945 Box 19, Folder 188
Note Material relating to Gruenberg’s magazine column ("Calling All Mothers") which was based on questions from readers.
Box 20
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: "Truth and Falsehood," 1925-1932 Box 20, Folder 189
Note Material relating to a pamphlet in CSAA’s "Studies in Child Training" series.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: Woman’s Day , 1946-1948 Box 20, Folder 190 to 191
Note In addition to material relating to articles written for the magazine, the folder includes correspondence re Gruenberg’s role as consultant on family relations.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg: Miscellaneous Topics, 1932-1933, 1955 Box 20, Folder 192
Note Material re articles on discipline, group prejudice, hobbies, ideals, spontaneity, the challenge that movies and radio present for traditional values, and the shift of influence (upon a child) from parents to friends.
 
Henry Haskell, 1959-1960 Box 20, Folder 193
Note Includes material for a Child Study article on independence in children.
 
Publication Committee, Abraham Heschel, 1960 Box 20, Folder 194
Note The folder contains material re an article on youth and the need for a radical revision of values.
 
Robert D. Hess, 1959 Box 20, Folder 195
Note Includes an article on the problems of interactions between parents and teenagers.
 
Dr. Laurence E. Hinkle, Jr., 1959 Box 20, Folder 196
Note Includes an article entitled "Physical Health, Mental Health, and the Social Environment: Some Characteristics of Healthy and Unhealthy People."
 
Mary Hoover, 1958-1959  Box 20, Folder 197
Note A CSAA pamphlet entitled When Children Need Special Help with Emotional Problems is included.
 
Eric Johnson, 1959-1960 Box 20, Folder 198
Note Includes correspondence re a article on children and education.
 
Wendell Johnson, 1959 Box 20, Folder 199
Note Material re an article on stuttering.
 
Dr. John Mote, 1954-1960 Box 20, Folder 200
Note Material relating to the collaboration of CSAA and Medical Counselors, Inc. in the writing of pamphlets about health problems.
 
Ralph H. Ojeman, 1959-1960 Box 20, Folder 201
Note Material relating to a book review prepared for Child Study .
 
Otto Pollak, 1960-1961 Box 20, Folder 202
Note Included is a topical outline for a pamphlet on sibling relationships and a memorandum re the reorganization of the Publications Department.
 
F. B. Rainsberry, 1960 Box 20, Folder 203
Note Material re an article on social responsibility and the use of television for children.
 
Judith Recht, 1957-1962 Box 20, Folder 204
Note Included is correspondence re a CSAA pamphlet on twins.
 
Marcus Riske, 1960 Box 20, Folder 205
Note Material re the White House Conference on Children and Youth.
 
Annemarie Roeper, 1958-1959 Box 20, Folder 206
Note Material re nursery schools.
Box 21
Dr. Milton Senn, 1957-1961 Box 21, Folder 207
Note Material generated during a visit to the U.S.S.R. by Yale University’s Child Study Center director. Included is a lecture re trends in child development research in Russia and their influence on American research and practice.
 
Dr. Martin Stein, 1956-1960 Box 21, Folder 208
Note In addition to articles and speeches re latency in teenagers, the folder includes a draft of a CSSA pamphlet on adolescence.
 
Lorene Stringer, 1958-1959 Box 21, Folder 209
Note An article for Child Study entitled "The Left-Behind Child" is included.
 
Violet Weingarten, 1961 Box 21, Folder 210
Note Includes an article on the working mother.
 
Miscellaneous "A," 1944, 1960-1963 Box 21, Folder 211
Note Includes a CSAA pamphlet entitled "When a Parent is Mentally Ill."
 
Miscellaneous "C-D-E-F,’ 1957-1963 Box 21, Folder 212
Note Articles re color blindness in children, a cross-cultural examination of child-rearing practices in France and the U.S., and an article entitled "Why Do Foreign Observers Call Our Girls Soft?" Also included is correspondence with Anna Freud and a summary of her lecture on the psychoanalytic study of children.
 
Miscellaneous "G-H-I,’ 1955-1963 Box 21, Folder 213
Note In addition to correspondence with contributors to Child Study , the folder contains an article on the use of films in human relations, family life, and mental health; a CSAA pamphlet re how to organize a parent education program; and an interpretative report on the annual conference proceedings.
 
Miscellaneous "J-K-L,’ 1957-1963 Box 21, Folder 214
Note In addition to routine correspondence with Child Study contributors, the folder contains articles entitled "Group Therapy with Fathers," and "Is the Large Family Coming Back?" Among the correspondents is Florence Kluckhohn.
 
Miscellaneous "M-N-O,’ 1952-1963 Box 21, Folder 215
Note Includes an article on cultural values and child training, and correspondence with Karl Menninger and Child Study contributors. Also included is a letter explaining the nature of the Publications Committee.
Box 22
Miscellaneous "M-N-O,’ 1952-1963 Box 22, Folder 216
Note Includes an article on cultural values and child training, and correspondence with Karl Menninger and Child Study contributors. Also included is a letter explaining the nature of the Publications Committee.
 
Miscellaneous "P-Q-R,’ 1955-1963 Box 22, Folder 217
Note In addition to correspondence with potential contributors to Child Study , the folder contains correspondence with Eleanor Roosevelt.
 
Miscellaneous "S-T-U-V,’ 1955-1963 Box 22, Folder 218
Note In addition to correspondence with Benjamin Spock, Adlai Stevenson, and Diana Trilling, the folder contains articles on the following subjects: casework concepts in educational counseling; child-rearing in Barbados; and the status of the Japanese in Hawaiian culture.
 
Miscellaneous "W-X-Y-Z,’ 1944, 1953-1961 Box 22, Folder 219
Note Includes correspondence with prospective contributors to Child Study . Also included is material re disagreements between parents and children and the first eighteen months of a child’s life.
 
Publications and Publishers  
Box 22
Basic Books, 1957-1960 Box 22, Folder 220
Note Material re reprint permission rights for Child Study .
 
Better Homes and Gardens , undated Box 22, Folder 221
Note Articles and questionnaires
 
Carteret School, 1956-1960 Box 22, Folder 222
Note A request for permission to reprint a Child Study article is included.
 
Crayon, Watercolor and Craft Institute, 1959-1960 Box 22, Folder 223
Note Material re the possible collaboration on a pamphlet about the value of an active art experience for children. Also included are notes from a meeting of CSAA’s Active Parents Program on art and children.
 
Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1951-1962 Box 22, Folder 224
Note Material re royalties and correspondence concerning a proposed CSAA parent’s handbook.
 
Doubleday and Co., 1950-1956 Box 22, Folder 225
Note In addition to a statement re CSAA cooperation with commercial organizations, the folder includes correspondence re Doubleday’s Parents’ Encyclopedia , which was edited by Sidonie Gruenberg.
 
Miscellaneous Publishers, 1957-1961 Box 22, Folder 226
Note Routine correspondence with major publishing houses.
 
Miscellaneous Articles, 1951-1960 Box 22, Folder 227
Note Included are articles on foot care, science and human values, and sexual behavior of adolescents.
 
Miscellaneous Staff Papers, 1946-1961 Box 22, Folder 228
Note In addition to correspondence and memoranda re royalties, the folder includes material re children and moving and sex education.
Box 23
Miscellaneous Staff Papers, 1946-1961 Box 23, Folder 229
 
Child Study , 1933-1936 Box 23, Folder 230 to 231
Note The folders contain correspondence, questionnaires, and reports re a study on radio programming for children.
 
Exhibits, 1960-1963 Box 23, Folder 232
Note Includes material re requests to participate in exhibits sponsored by organizations such as the International Conference of Social Work and the National Council on Family Relations.
 
Scrapbook, 1952-1953 Box 23, Folder 233
Note  Child Study articles, newspaper clippings, press releases, promotional material, and articles from other organizations and individuals.
 
Radio Committee  
Box 23
Correspondence and Papers, 1935-1938 Box 23, Folder 234
Note In addition to articles and pamphlets re radio programs for children and radio programs concerning parent education, the folder contains correspondence with or about organizations such as the National Advisory Council on Radio in Education and the Women’s National Radio Committee. Also included are committee minutes, a list of committee members, and a list of criteria developed by the committee to facilitate the evaluation of children’s radio programs.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1940-1944 Box 23, Folder 235
Note Articles re children’s radio programs, information re the origins of the Radio Committee, and minutes of meetings. Among the correspondents are Lyman Bryson, Institute for Education by Radio, and the Radio Council on Children’s Programs. Social attitudes in radio serials and the use of radio during World War II are among the topics discussed.
Box 24
Correspondence and Papers, 1945-1947 Box 24, Folder 236
Note In addition to material re a CSAA radio meeting on intercultural education for youth, the folder contains correspondence with or about the Bureau for Intercultural Education, Citizens’ Radio Committee, Institute for Democratic Education, William Heard Kilpatrick, Margaret Mead, and Robert Thorndike.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1948-1959 Box 24, Folder 237
Note Material re children’s radio programs and an article about violence in children’s stories.
 
Correspondence and Papers, undated Box 24, Folder 238
Note Articles re children’s radio programs and the shaping of social attitudes through the radio.
 
Correspondence and Papers, "Superman," 1940-1942 Box 24, Folder 239
Note Material generated by the consultation given to Superman DC Publications and to New York City radio station WOR re the "Superman" radio program.
 
Correspondence and Papers,"Superman," 1943-1948, 1954 Box 24, Folder 240
Note Includes material re the altering of Superman’s characterization from that of a gangster fighter to that of a socially motivated citizen who combats racism, religious intolerance, and juvenile delinquency. Correspondents include the Big Brother movement, Council Against Intolerance in America, National Conference of Christians and Jews, Office of War Information, and the Society to Maintain Public Decency.
 
Articles and Pamphlets, 1933-1941 Box 24, Folder 241
Note Material published by CSAA, Progressive Education Association, and the Radio Institute of the Audible Arts. Sidonie Gruenberg and Lyman Bryson are among the authors.
 
Awards, 1943-1948 Box 24, Folder 242 to 243
Note Includes material re an award for an outstanding script for a children’s program. Pamphlets pertaining to radio programming during World War II are also included. Correspondents include Eleanor Roosevelt.
Box 25
Awards, 1943-1948 Box 25, Folder 244 to 245
 
Conferences, 1941 Box 25, Folder 246 to 247
Note Material stemming from a panel discussion on radio and children includes correspondence and the transcript of the discussion. Correspondents include Lyman Bryson, Benjamin Spock, and Robert Thorndike.
 
Conferences, 1943-1945 Box 25, Folder 248
Note Material arising from a conference re shaping social attitudes (particularly attitudes pertaining to the people of enemy nations) through children’s radio programs. Clifton Fadiman is among the correspondents.
 
Conferences, 1943-1947 Box 25, Folder 249 to 250
Note Included is material generated by a conference sponsored by the Institute for Education by Radio.
 
Research Committee in Educational Experiment and Literature  
Box 25
Research Committee in Educational Experiment and Literature, Annual and Interim Reports, 1929-1930 Box 25, Folder 251
Note In addition to routine committee reports, the folder contains a listing of universities, private and public schools, municipal and state agencies, and other organizations to which the committee sent bibliographies and other information.
 
Summer Play Schools Committee  
Box 25
Annual Report, 1929 Box 25, Folder 252
Note Included is a list of summer play school centers, references to the ethnic backgrounds of the participants (Irish, Italian, Jewish, and African American), and references to the activities of the centers.
Box 25-34
Series 4. Departments and Programs, 1926-1965 Box 25-34, Folder 253-352
Note  Series 4, Departments and Programs, consists primarily of the records of two of CSAA's core programs. The Study Group Department (folders 253-300) documents the chapters, most located in New York City, where groups of parents and professionals met regularly to discuss child rearing and development. The records of individual chapters are arranged by chapter number and include annual reports, correspondence, and minutes of meetings. Records from the study group department staff, including minutes of staff meetings, correspondence, and membership lists, are also filed in this series. The Program Advisory Service, formerly the Speakers' Bureau, records (folders 301-351) include correspondence, abstracts, and transcripts by Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Josette Frank, and other staff members. These materials relate to various lectures, radio addresses, symposia, and university courses in which CSAA staff members participated.
 
Study Group Department  
 
Staff  
Box 25
Minutes, 1935 Box 25, Folder 253
Note Discussions re annual conferences, lecture programs, and the procedures of study groups.
 
Correspondence, 1927-1936 Box 25, Folder 254
Note Material re the solicitation of members for study groups and a special course in personality development.
 
Chapter History, 1926-1928 Box 25, Folder 255
Note Material relating to the history, functions, and purposes of CSAA from 1888 to 1928. Included are a list of chapters, their activities, leaders, location, and status.
 
Chapter Leaders, 1932-1933 Box 25, Folder 256
Note Included are names and addresses of study group leaders.
 
Outlines of Chapter Discussions, 1928-1930 Box 25, Folder 257 to 258
Note Material re discussion of topics such as adolescence, definition of social development, early childhood, progressive methods in education, sex education, and toddlers.
Box 26
Pamphlets, 1928 Box 26, Folder 259
Note Pamphlets re the development, methods, and techniques of child study group discussions.
 
Programs and Questionnaires, 1933-1936 Box 26, Folder 260
Note Includes a list of tentative programs, questionnaires for study groups, reports on parent education, and a study group outline on adolescence.
 
Questionnaires, 1930-1932 Box 26, Folder 261
Note Material re questionnaires on children and money, punishment, and sex education.
 
Teaching Methods in Art Appreciation, 1933-1935 Box 26, Folder 262 to 264
Note Correspondence, outlines, and reports re the teaching of art appreciation to children.
 
White House Conference Report, undated Box 26, Folder 265
Note Tentative report prepared by the Study Group Department for the Conference’s subcommittee on cooperation between home and school.
 
Individual chapters  
Box 26
Chapter 124, 1931-1932 Box 26, Folder 266
Note Description of topics discussed by a Roxbury, Massachusetts, study group.
 
Chapter 128, 1926-1928 Box 26, Folder 267 to 268
Note Includes membership list, minutes, reports, and an article by Sidonie Gruenberg which was based upon the chapter’s group discussions. Also included is a CSAA pamphlet on imagination.
 
Chapter 128, 1929-1940 Box 26, Folder 269
Note In addition to a bibliography on adolescence and a list of chapter members, the folder contains material re the reorganization of the chapter.
 
Chapter 370, 1930-1932 Box 26, Folder 270 to 271
Note Minutes and reports from a chapter studying infancy
 
Chapter 371, 1930-1931 Box 26, Folder 272
Note Minutes from a study group whose topic was the toddler.
 
Chapter 372, 1930-1931 Box 26, Folder 273
Note Material re discussion of early childhood, habit in child training, imagination, jealousy, punishment, Santa Claus, and truth and falsehood.
Box 27
Chapter 372, 1930-1931 Box 27, Folder 274
 
Chapter 373, 1930-1931 Box 27, Folder 275
Note The topic of the group was the child, age 6-10. Included are reports and a questionnaire on rewards and punishments.
 
Chapter 375, 1930-1931 Box 27, Folder 276
Note Includes material re adolescence, the designated topic of the study group.
 
Chapter 376, 1930-1931 Box 27, Folder 277
Note Material re discussion of children’s fears, discipline, sex curiosity, and truth and falsehood. An outline on the fundamentals of child study is also included.
 
Chapter 377, 1930-1931 Box 27, Folder 278
Note Material relating to a group consisting of governesses and mother’s helpers. The purpose of the group was to study the personality of the child.
 
Chapter 378, . 1930-1931 Box 27, Folder 279
Note Discussions re the trends of contemporary education and observations of progressive schools are recorded in the minutes.
 
Chapter 379, 1930-1931 Box 27, Folder 280
Note Topics covered by this sex education study group were breast feeding, homosexuality, masturbation, and sexual mores.
 
Chapter 425, 1931-1932 Box 27, Folder 281 to 282
Note Material re adolescence, the designated subject of the group. Topics discussed were allowances, coeducational schools, religion, sex education, and social privileges.
 
Parent Education Content and Resources  
Box 27
Leadership Education Program, 1927-1931 Box 27, Folder 283
Note Material re the training of leaders for parent education.
 
Leadership Education Program, 1955, 1959 Box 27, Folder 284
Note Material re a change in the Leadership Education Program from selecting leaders from within the established CSAA study group structure, to emphasizing the training of professional people, e.g., public health nurses, religious educators, and social workers.
 
Leadership Education Program, 1964-1965 Box 27, Folder 285 to 286
Note Material re a group leadership training program for family caseworkers. The project was cosponsored by CSAA and Family Service Association of America.
Box 28
Parent Education, Expectant Parents, 1949-1954 Box 28, Folder 287 to 288
Note Includes discussion records of an expectant mothers’ group. The reports were written by leaders-in-training as part of required field work in a CSAA training program.
 
Parent Education, Mentally Ill and Physically Handicapped Children, 1954-1961 Box 28, Folder 289
Note Included are records of groups which discussed the following topics: brain injured children, Cooley’s Anemia, handicapped children, preschool children with cerebral palsy , and children subject to seizures. The reports were written by participants in CSAA’s leadership training program.
 
Parent Education, Miscellaneous Groups, 1957-1961 Box 28, Folder 290 to 291
Note Reports prepared by leaders-in-training focus on groups whose topics were preschool children, elementary school children, and teenagers. Also included is a report of a study group comprised of medical students’ wives.
 
Parent Education, Resource Materials, 1931, 1947-1961 Box 28, Folder 292 to 294
Note Information from organizations such as the American Association for Mental Deficiency, National Association of Social Workers, National Conference of Christians and Jews, National Education Association, and the World Family Congress.
Box 29
Parent Education, Resource Materials, 1931, 1947-1961 Box 29, Folder 295 to 296
Note Continued from previous folder
 
Unit Courses: Introduction to Parenthood, 1935 Box 29, Folder 297
Note Includes outlines of courses which were taught by the CSAA staff.
 
Unit Courses: Sex Education, 1931 Box 29, Folder 298 to 299
Note Included are articles on sex education, attendance lists, and minutes of meetings
 
Unit Courses: Women in Conflict, 1936 Box 29, Folder 300
Note The folder contains notes of the first meeting and a reading list for the course.
 
Program Advisory Service (Speaker’s Bureau)  
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg  
Box 29
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1935 Box 29, Folder 301
Note Includes correspondence generated by speaking engagements with the Illinois League of Nursing Education, National Council of Jewish Women, New Jersey Department of Health, and the National Organization for Public Health Nursing.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1936 Box 29, Folder 302 to 303
Note Correspondence stemming from speaking engagements with organizations such as: American Association of University Women, Health and Parent Education Association, New York Society for the Experimental Study of Education, Nineteenth Century Woman’s Club, and the Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1937 Box 29, Folder 304 to 305
Note Includes material relating to Gruenberg’s Colorado lecture tour, which was sponsored by the Colorado Parent Education Conference.
Box 30
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1938 Box 30, Folder 306 to 307
Note Material generated by Gruenberg’s participation in the Pacific conference of the New Education Fellowship.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1939 Box 30, Folder 308 to 310
Note Correspondence arising from speaking engagements with organizations such as: Family and Children’s Society, Family Relations Center, National Conference of Christians and Jews, New Jersey Child Caring Group, New York City Conference on the Emigre and the Community, Progressive Education Association, and the Society for Ethical Culture. Among the correspondents is Rachel Davis-Dubois of the Service Bureau for Intercultural Education.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1940 Box 30, Folder 311
Note Material stemming from speaking engagements before the American Association for Adult Education, Association for Family Living, Birth Control Federation of America, Child Education Foundation, Henry George School of Social Science, and the Society for Ethical Culture. Also included is correspondence arising from Gruenberg’s western lecture tour.
Box 31
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1940 Box 31, Folder 312 to 313
Note Continued from previous folder
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1941 Box 31, Folder 314 to 315
Note Correspondence re speaking engagements before the American Eugenics Society, Association for Family Living, Child Education Society, Henry George School of Social Science, Jewish Institute on Marriage and the Family, New Education Fellowship, Society for Ethical Culture, and the YMCA.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1942 Box 31, Folder 316 to 317
Note Material stemming from speaking engagements before the American Social Hygiene Association, Association for Childhood Education, Association for Family Living, Maternity Center Association, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Quaker Emergency Service, Society for Ethical Culture, and the United Neighborhood Houses of New York. Among the correspondents is Dr. Martha Eliot.
Box 32
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1942 Box 32, Folder 318
Note Continued from previous folder
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1943 Box 32, Folder 319 to 320
Note Material re speaking engagements before the Association for Early Childhood Education, Children’s Welfare Federation of New York City, National Council of Jewish Women, National Education Association, New York Academy of Medicine, and the Virginia League for Planned Parenthood.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1944 Box 32, Folder 321 to 324
Note Correspondents include the Association for Family Living, Infants Welfare League, National Council of Jewish Women, New York State Conference on Social Work, and the Rochester (New York) Guidance Center.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Correspondence, 1945-1946 Box 32, Folder 325 to 327
Note Included among the correspondents are the Association for Family Living, China Aid Council, Church Committee for Relief in Asia, National Conference of Christians and Jews, National Conference of American-Soviet Friendship, and Teachers’ College. Also included is a Gruenberg speech entitled "How Reconversion Problems Affect the Family."
Box 33
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Lecture Abstracts, 1928-1929 Box 33, Folder 328
Note Includes papers re the parent education movement and religious education.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Lecture Abstracts, 1930-1932 Box 33, Folder 329
Note Lectures re child study groups, parent education movement in the US, sex education, the significance of the home in personality development, techniques of parent education, and the training of leaders for parent education.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Lecture Abstracts, 1933-1939 Box 33, Folder 330
Note Includes papers re intra-familial relationships, money, African American study groups, parent education movement, radio, school and home, sex education, and social forces in a child’s life.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Lecture Abstracts, 1941-1942 Box 33, Folder 331
Note Papers re the family and school, marriage, modern problems of community living, and problems arising from World War II.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Lecture Abstracts, undated Box 33, Folder 332
Note Papers re the basic factors in parent education, child rearing in the present day world, radio and the child, school and home, and sex education.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Lecture Outlines and Topics, 1932-1944 Box 33, Folder 333
Note Bibliographies for lectures, outlines for courses, and suggested lecture topics. Also present are papers re the world conference of the New Education Fellowship.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Lecture Programs, 1933-1943 Box 33, Folder 334
Note Included are programs from conferences, lectures, and symposia in which Gruenberg participated.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, Radio Addresses and Correspondence, 1929-1943  Box 33, Folder 335
Note Material re Gruenberg’s appearances on radio. Topics discussed include children’s play, modern parents, money and children, planned parenthood, progressive education and character training, radio, and World War II.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, University Lecture Courses, 1928-1940 Box 33, Folder 336 to 339
Note Material pertaining to Gruenberg’s courses on the family, parent-child relationships, and parent education at Teachers College and New York University. Included are descriptions of the courses, minutes of class meetings, student reports, and transcripts of lectures. Among the topics discussed are the changing status of women, discipline and authority, habit, leisure time activities, and sex education.
 
Josette Frank  
Box 34
Josette Frank, Correspondence and Papers, 1946 Box 34, Folder 340
Note Material re a conference on radio’s postwar responsibilities. Discussions involve intercultural and inter-faith material on the radio and the importance of local programming.
 
Josette Frank, Correspondence and Papers, 1947-1960 Box 34, Folder 341 to 342
Note Includes material generated by speaking engagements before the Author’s Guild, Baltimore Ethical Society, Camp Fire Girls, Institute for Education by the Radio, National Council of Jewish Women, New Jersey Association of Nursery Education, and the New York Junior League.
 
Josette Frank, Correspondence and Papers, 1964 Box 34, Folder 343
Note Papers pertaining to Frank’s participation in a workshop at a conference of the American Orthopsychiatric Association. The topic discussed was the impact of modern fiction on the young.
 
Josette Frank, Correspondence and Papers, 1965 Box 34, Folder 344
Note Material re an institute sponsored by the Milwaukee Radio and Television Council. Included is Frank’s address on television and the learning process.
 
Josette Frank, Radio Addresses and Correspondence, 1943-1954 Box 34, Folder 345 to 346
Note Clippings, correspondence, and radio scripts are included. Topics discussed include the influences of comics, motion pictures, and radio.
 
Josette Frank, White House Conference on Children and Youth, 1950, 1960 Box 34, Folder 347 to 348
Note Material re Frank’s participation in workshops at the conference. Included are notes, outlines, programs, and workshop recommendations.
 
CSAA Staff Radio Addresses, 1929-1935 Box 34, Folder 349
Note Included are radio addresses re adult attitudes and health education, children’s books, habits, school and home, and socializing the infant.
 
Symposium and Conference, 1933-1936 Box 34, Folder 350
Note Material re a symposium entitled "What Is Ahead for Youth," and a conference entitled "Parents and Children in Changing Society."
 
Symposium and Conference, 1960 Box 34, Folder 351
Note Material re a conference for workers in parent education
 
Family Guidance and Consultation Service  
Box 34
Family Guidance and Consultation Service, 1928-1933, 1943 Box 34, Folder 352
Note Among the papers are the preliminary report, psychiatric history, analysis of progress, and interpretation of a case.
Box 34-35
Series 5. Staff, 1930-1963 Box 34-35, Folder 353-395
Note  Series 5, Staff, includes staff meeting materials plus the personal papers of two key personnel: Sidonie Matsner Gruenberg and Josette Frank. Professional staff meeting minutes, 1947-1963, and non-professional staff meetings, 1958-1963, document office procedures, personnel policies, reporting structure, and routine activities of CSAA. Includes discussion regarding legislation related to CSAA interests as well as the mission, history, and programs of CSAA.
 
Professional and Nonprofessional Staff Papers  
Box 34
Nonprofessional Staff, Minutes, 1958-1963 Box 34, Folder 353
Note Material re lines of authority and responsibility for the nonprofessional staff, office procedures, personnel practices, and discussions of CSAA programs.
 
Professional Staff, Minutes, 1947-1960 Box 34, Folder 354
Note Material re the routine operations of CSAA including conferences, courses, fund-raising, publications standing committee reports, and staff procedures. Also included are discussions of legislative bills related to CSAA interests.
Box 35
Professional Staff, Minutes, 1961-1963 Box 35, Folder 355
Note In addition to discussions re conferences, lecture series, and better utilization of advisory board members, the folder contains a board request for suggestions for a subtitle to follow the Association’s name. Also included is executive director Buchmueller’s announcement that the Association would "be guided by the philosophy and new policy of CSAA’s becoming a training institute."
 
Professional Staff, Correspondence, 1932, 1942-1949 Box 35, Folder 356
Note The folder contains correspondence with Mrs. John D. Rockefeller, III, and others re fund-raising.
 
Professional Staff, Papers, 1930-1938 Box 35, Folder 357
Note Reference material re the history, structure, and purposes of CSAA. Also included is a report re Child Study detailing its functions, history, and editorial processes.
 
Professional Staff, Papers, 1940-1956 Box 35, Folder 358
Note Included are memoranda, press releases, descriptions of program developments, and resource material re the activities, history, and policies of CSAA.
 
Professional Staff, Papers, 1958-1962 Box 35, Folder 359
Note Included are committee minutes, fund-raising materials, and papers re the following projects: a conference on mental health education, training professionals for discussion group leadership, and the promotion of mental health within the Westchester Square Health District in New York City.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg personal papers 1904-1950 
Note The papers of CSAA executive director, Sidonie M. Gruenberg, include articles, correspondence, speeches on various topics, and royalty statements. A portion of Sidonie Gruenberg's papers reflects her involvement in efforts to bring European emigres to the United States prior to and during World War II. The records also relate to family and personal matters and Gruenberg's work at CSAA.
Box 35
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, 1904-1905 Box 35, Folder 360
Note Includes Gruenberg’s Ethical Culture class notebook on kindergarten theory.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, 1913-1929 Box 35, Folder 361
Note Articles, personal correspondence, royalty statements, and schedules.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, 1931-1933 Box 35, Folder 362
Note Papers re assignment of copyright, personal correspondence, and royalty statements. Also included are Benjamin C. Gruenberg’s course outlines for the New Education Fellowship Conference and the New School for Social Research.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, 1934-1935 Box 35, Folder 363
Note In addition to articles, personal correspondence and royalty statements, the folder contains a lecture re children’s radio programs.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, 1936-1937 Box 35, Folder 364
Note Papers re the emigration of Gruenberg’s cousin to America. Among the correspondents is the National Council of Jewish Women.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, 1938 Box 35, Folder 365
Note Income tax return forms, royalty statements, and correspondence re the emigration of Europeans to America. Among the correspondents are the Hebrew Sheltering and Immigrant Aid Society of America, National Council of Jewish Women, Fritz Redl, and the Workers Education Bureau of America.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, 1939-1940 Box 35, Folder 366 to 367
Note Includes affidavits of support for immigrants, itineraries, and royalty statements. Among the correspondents are the Hebrew Sheltering and Immigrant Aid Society of America, National Council of Jewish Women, and the National Resources Planning Board.
Box 36
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, 1941 Box 36, Folder 368
Note Clippings, personal correspondence, and material re immigration papers. The American Association for the Advancement of Science and John Lovejoy Elliott are among the correspondents.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, 1942-1944 Box 36, Folder 369 to 371
Note In addition to personal correspondence re the war effort, the folder contains material from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, New York Federation of Jewish Charities, and the War Manpower Commission.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, 1945 Box 36, Folder 372 to 374
Note Correspondence re Ernest Gruenberg’s escape from a German prisoner of war camp. The folder also contains material from the following correspondents: American Red Cross, Associated Junior Work Camps, Association for Family Living, Walter Damrosch for the Council for Fair Play to Promote Racial Understanding, John Hersey, National Committee for Mental Hygiene, National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, Parents’ Institute, Society for Ethical Culture, United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, and Orson Welles for the American Youth for a Free World.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, 1946-1950 Box 36, Folder 375
Note Includes correspondence from Dorothy Canfield Fisher and a citation from the Victory Center.
 
Sidonie M. Gruenberg, undated Box 36, Folder 376
Note In addition to personal correspondence, the folder contains articles, itineraries, memoranda, and programs. The White House Conference’s "Children’s Charter" is also included.
 
Josette Frank personal papers 1930-1965 
Note The personal papers of CSAA staff member, Josette Frank, include articles, correspondence, and speeches on various topics. Josette Frank's papers reflect her work in the area of children's literature and literacy programs. The papers also include her radio scripts on child development topics. Other topics include radio and television in relation to child development and Frank's visit to Japan in 1962-1963.
Box 36
Josette Frank, Correspondence and Papers, 1930-1949 Box 36, Folder 377
Note Correspondence with authors of children’s books, the American Unitarian Association, Council on Books in Wartime, National Board of Review of Motion Pictures, and the Office of War Information. Also included is material re the social psychology of education.
Box 37
Josette Frank, Correspondence and Papers, 1951-1953 Box 37, Folder 378
Note Information re educational television, press releases, and a reading guidance index.
 
Josette Frank, Correspondence and Papers, 1954-1955 Box 37, Folder 379
Note Material re the US Senate Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency. Also included are booklists, memoranda, minutes of the children’s book committee, and routine correspondence with educational organizations and publishing companies.
 
Josette Frank, Correspondence and Papers, , April-June,1955 Box 37, Folder 380
Note Includes material re the scope and function of the book review committee and a UNESCO report on film production. Correspondents include Helen Hall, the New York Philanthropic League, and the New York Public Library.
 
Josette Frank, Correspondence and Papers, 1955-1956 Box 37, Folder 381
Note Information re projects in children’s literature is included. Correspondents include the Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith, Norman Cousins, and the National Book Committee as well as several libraries, publishers, schools, and television stations. Also included is a list of Frank’s professional contacts during 1955.
 
Josette Frank, Correspondence and Papers, 1957-1965 Box 37, Folder 382
Note Articles, press releases, and speeches are included. Among the correspondents are the Association Press, Children’s Book Council, Family Service Association, Edwin Gould Foundation for Children, National Association for Better Radio and Television, and the National Conference of Christians and Jews.
 
Josette Frank, American Jewish Committee, 1944-1945 Box 37, Folder 383
Note Material relating to "Parents’ Forum," a radio show sponsored by the American Jewish Committee. Topics discussed scripts by Josette Frank include jealousy, manners, religious education, slang, vacations, and the return of father/soldiers from World War II.
 
Josette Frank, Camp Fire Girls, 1954-1964 Box 37, Folder 384 to 385
Note Includes material generated by Frank’s appointment to the national program committee of the Camp Fire Girls.
 
Josette Frank, Hospitals, 1951 1956 Box 37, Folder 386
Note Correspondence re pamphlets on hospitals.
 
Josette Frank, Japanese Trip, 1962-1963 Box 37, Folder 387
Note Material stemming from Frank’s visit to Japan includes correspondence with several Japanese educators.
 
Josette Frank, Libraries, 1955-1957 Box 37, Folder 388
Note Material relating to the American Library Association’s "Freedom to Read" program. Correspondents include the Association for Childhood Education International and the National Council of Jewish Women.
Box 38
Josette Frank, National Conference of Christians and Jews, 1951-1963 Box 38, Folder 389
Note Includes material pertaining to Frank’s participation on the selection committee for the Books for Brotherhood awards.
 
Josette Frank, Pratt Institute, 1959 Box 38, Folder 390
Note Correspondence re CSAA’s library of children’s books.
 
Josette Frank, Radio, 1945-1954 Box 38, Folder 391
Note Material re Frank’s consultant position for a radio show entitled "Tobe’s Topics." Also included is an outline for a radio series about Superman.
 
Josette Frank, Television, 1950-1956 Box 38, Folder 392
Note Includes articles and correspondence re the use of television in schools. Also included is a proposal for a CSAA television committee
 
Josette Frank, Youth Films Foundation, 1961-1962 Box 38, Folder 393
Note Material re a request for Frank to serve on the Foundation’s Advisory Board.
 
Josette Frank, Scrapbook Material, 1930-1963 Box 38, Folder 394 to 395
Note Includes material pertaining to children’s reading, functions of the Children’s Book Committee, newspaper clippings, and press releases.
Box 38-40
Series 6. Guest books, Notebooks, Photographs, and Scrapbooks, 1903-1954 Box 38-40, Folder 396-414
Note  Series 6, Guest books, Notebooks, Photographs, and Scrapbooks, consists of articles, invitations, programs, fliers, pamphlets, form letters, press releases, and promotional materials housed in scrapbooks and notebooks. The series also includes songs and skits from CSAA parties, programs from conferences that were held between 1935 and 1954, and CSAA guest books from the 1920s and 1930s. Finally, the series contains eight folders of photographs dating from 1930 to 1944. The photographs show CSAA exhibits, offices, and meetings. Images of Eleanor Roosevelt, Felix Adler, Dorothy Canfield Fisher, and Helen Harris are also included.
Box 38
Christmas Parties, 1930-1939 Box 38, Folder 396
Note Invitations, programs, skits, and songs.
 
Guest Book, 1926, 1938 Box 38, Folder 397
Note Includes names of guests who attended receptions.
 
Guest Book, undated Box 38, Folder 398
Note Includes names of individuals who visited CSAA headquarters.
 
Notebook, 1903, 1933, 1944-1950 Box 38, Folder 399
Note Articles, clippings, fliers, invitations, pamphlets, and programs.
Box 39
Notebook, 1945-1946 Box 39, Folder 400
Note Articles, form letters, and promotional material.
 
Notebook, 1948-1957 Box 39, Folder 401
Note Articles, press releases, and promotional material.
 
Photographs, 1930-1944, and undated. Box 39, Folder 402 to 409
Note Included are photographs of the following individuals and settings: Felix Adler, CSAA library, CSAA meetings, display windows, exhibits, Helen Ferris, Dorothy Canfield Fisher, and Eleanor Roosevelt.
 
Programs, 1935-1954 Box 39, Folder 410
Note In addition to programs for symposia and conferences, the folder contains material re the 50th anniversary conference.
 
Scrapbook, 1931-1938 Box 39, Folder 411 to 412
Note Included are clippings, invitations, press releases, promotional material, and a list of Gruenberg’s publications. Also included are articles by Gruenberg on the following topics: her childhood, children’s camps, radio, and the special problems of urban living.
Box 40
Songs, Skit Scripts, 1927-1939 Box 40, Folder 413 to 414
Note Includes material for CSAA parties.
Box 40-45
Series 7. Related Organizations, 1925-1949 Box 40-45
Note  Series 7, Related Organizations, comprises the records of two organizations closely associated with CSAA. The Inter-Community Child Study Committee (folders 415-459) and the National Council of Parent Education (folders 460-486).
 
Inter-Community Child Study Committee  
Note The Inter-Community Child Study Committee (1925-1935) was a semi-autonomous group founded in 1929 to further CSAA's interest in providing parent education in African American communities. The records include executive board minutes, correspondence, reports, and the papers of several local chapters of the committee. These materials detail the formation and work of the Committee, which included child study groups in Brooklyn; Baltimore; Montclair and Englewood, New Jersey; North Harlem; and Washington, D.C.
 
Committee Minutes  
Box 40
Inter-Community Child Study Committee Minutes, 1931 Box 40, Folder 415
Note Includes discussions re the extension of the committee program and a plan to enlist the aid of other organizations.
 
Executive Board, 1932-1935 Box 40, Folder 416
Note In addition to a list of officers and a proposed budget, the minutes contain discussions of the structure and functions of the Committee.
 
Nominating Committee, 1932-1933 Box 40, Folder 417
Note Material re the business and operations of the committee.
 
Committee Correspondence,  
Box 40
Correspondence, 1929 Box 40, Folder 418
Note The folder contains correspondence re the origins of the Inter-Community Child Study Committee. Correspondents include officials of the Brooklyn Urban League Lincoln Settlement, Columbus Hill Neighborhood Center, and the YMCA.
 
Correspondence, 1930 Box 40, Folder 419
Note Includes correspondence between Margaret Quilliard (director of field work) and committee members. Also included is correspondence with the National Urban League’s Opportunity the Association for the Study of Negro Life’s Journal of Negro History , and W. E. B. DuBois of The Crisis .
 
Correspondence, January-April, 1931 Box 40, Folder 420
Note Routine correspondence re committee matters. Correspondents include Bennett College for Women, Harlem Adult Education Committee, and the National Congress of Colored Parents and Teachers.
 
Correspondence, May-December, 1931 Box 40, Folder 421
Note Correspondents include the American Social Hygiene Association, Baptist Educational Center, Bennett College for Women, Johnson C. Smith University, and the National Congress of Colored Parents and Teachers.
 
Correspondence, January-June, 1932 Box 40, Folder 422
Note Correspondents include Council on Adult Education for the Foreign-born, Harlem Adult Education Committee, National Urban League, and the National Congress of Colored Parents and Teachers. Also included is correspondence with Violet Hill Whyte of the National Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, who was also an officer of the Inter-Community Child Study Committee.
 
Correspondence, July-December, 1932 Box 40, Folder 423
Note Material re the committee bulletin and committee conferences. Correspondents include the Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor, Eastchester Neighborhood Association, Social Service Federation of Englewood, and Violet Hill Whyte of the National Woman’s Christian Temperance Union.
 
Correspondence, 1933 Box 40, Folder 424
Note Correspondence re committee conferences, meetings, and new branches. Correspondents include the Harlem Adult Education Committee and the Society of Friends' Institute of Race Relations.
 
Correspondence, 1934 Box 40, Folder 425
Note Routine correspondence re conferences, fund-raising, meetings, and projects. Correspondents include the Boy Scouts of America, Eastchester Neighborhood Association, and the New York Urban League.
 
Correspondence, 1935 Box 40, Folder 426
Note Includes correspondence re Margaret Quilliard’s resignation from CSAA and Inter-Community Child Study Committee.
 
Correspondence, undated Box 40, Folder 427
Note Includes material from the National Congress of Parents and Teachers and the National Congress of Colored Parents and Teachers.
 
Annual Conferences  
Box 40
Annual Conference Programs, 1929-1935. Box 40, Folder 428
 
Second Annual Conference, 1929-1930. Box 40, Folder 429
Note In addition to the conference minutes, the folder contains an address on child study in the school, questionnaires re the value of the conference, and reports on chapter activities.
Box 41
Third Annual Conference, 1931 Box 41, Folder 430
Note In addition to the conference minutes, the folder contains correspondence re the conference, guest lists, programs, and a transcript of an address on the African American family.
 
Fourth Annual Conference, 1932 Box 41, Folder 431
Note Material re the conference includes the minutes, questionnaires re the conference topic, reports from committee branches, and a speech on the needs of the adolescent. Among the correspondents is Oswald Garrison Villard.
 
Fifth Annual Conference, 1933 Box 41, Folder 432
Note Includes the minutes of the conference planning committee, the executive board, and the conference business meeting. Also included are addresses re boy and girl friendships and conflicting loyalties of children.
 
Sixth Annual Conference, 1934 Box 41, Folder 433
Note Material re the conference includes agendas, attendance lists, newspaper clippings, minutes, and programs. Fritz Wittels (a Viennese psychoanalyst) was the guest speaker and is among the correspondents.
 
Seventh Annual Conference, 1935 Box 41, Folder 434
Note Included are attendance lists, expense lists, and notices re the conference.
 
Committee Records,  
Box 41
Bulletins, 1930-1935 Box 41, Folder 435
Note The folder contains Inter-Community Child Study Committee bulletins 1-7. In addition to information re the history, purposes, and structure of Committee, the bulletins contain reports from the member branches.
 
Miscellaneous Records, 1925-1929 Box 41, Folder 436
Note Included are the committee membership roster, lists of physicians and African American school teachers in Harlem, a memo re the organizational meeting of the Inter-Community Child Study Committee, pamphlets from the National Congress of Colored Parents and Teachers, a policy statement re the development of child study groups in the African American community, statistics re economic status of African Americans, and YMCA materials relating to programs for African American boys and girls. Also included are statements re the purpose of Inter-Community Child Study Committee.
 
Miscellaneous Records, 1930 Box 41, Folder 437
Note Material re the purposes of developing child study groups among African Americans. Also included are attendance records, bulletins, and clippings.
 
Miscellaneous Records, 1931 Box 41, Folder 438
Note The folder contains clippings, form letters re conferences, budgets for the extension of work among African Americans, and statements re presumed characteristics of African Americans as a group. Also included is material from the Interracial News Service.
 
Papers, 1932 Box 41, Folder 439
Note In addition to bulletins, clippings, interim reports from the committee branches, and membership lists, the folder contains a chart delineating the development of ICCSC work in African American communities. Also included are lists of African American churches in Brooklyn and Harlem and a list of Harlem agencies that served the area's African American population.
 
Papers, 1933 Box 41, Folder 440
Note Included are membership lists, a status report on the Inter-Community Child Study Committee, and material re the US Office of Education Conference on Negro Education.
 
Miscellaneous Records, 1934 Box 41, Folder 441
Note Bulletins, committee membership rosters, guest lists, and a list of officers. Also included is information re the US Office of Education Conference on Negro Education.
 
Miscellaneous Records, 1935 Box 41, Folder 442
Note Includes bulletins, mailing lists, and programs for the annual conferences.
 
Miscellaneous Records, n.d. Box 41, Folder 443
Note Material re the functions performed by the CSAA field work department, a pamphlet re the objectives of child study groups, a proposed yearly budget for the extension of work in the African American community, and a report on the status of parent education. Also included are a speech on children’s social attitudes, a copy of the "Negro National Anthem," and statements by African American members re the value of child study groups.
 
Local Branches  
Box 41
Baltimore, Maryland Branch, 1929-1934 Box 41, Folder 444
Note In addition to advisory board minutes, mailing lists, programs from mass meetings, and reports, the folder contains correspondence re the creation of the Baltimore branch. Problems re the intermixing of African American and white study groups in Baltimore are also discussed
Box 42
Brooklyn, New York Branch, 1930-1934 Box 42, Folder 445
Note Attendance lists, minutes, and correspondence re the formation of African American study groups in Brooklyn.
 
Englewood, New Jersey Branch, 1929-1934 Box 42, Folder 446 to 447
Note Includes agenda, attendance records, correspondence re the formation and development of the Englewood branch, membership lists, newspaper clippings, and programs. Material re a branch-sponsored sex education course for local girls is also included. Among the correspondents are the League for Social Service Among Colored People and the Social Service Federation of Englewood.
 
Montclair, New Jersey Branch Minutes, 1930-1933 Box 42, Folder 448
Note Minutes of meetings held at the YMCA include discussions of branch activities, disobedience, family relations, fear, habits, and sex education.
 
Montclair, New Jersey Branch Correspondence, 1929-1935 Box 42, Folder 449 to 450
Note In addition to routine correspondence, the folder contains information re the formation and development of the Montclair branch.
 
Montclair, New Jersey Branch Miscellaneous Records 1930-1933 Box 42, Folder 451
Note Attendance records, bibliographies, membership lists, program suggestions, publicity material, and reports re the value of child study groups.
 
North Harlem, New York Branch Minutes, 1928-1933 Box 42, Folder 452
Note Includes information re the formation and development of the North Harlem branch.
 
North Harlem, New York Branch, Advisory Group Records, 1930 Box 42, Folder 453
Note Minutes of the first meeting are included.
 
North Harlem, New York Branch Correspondence, 1928-1934 Box 42, Folder 454
Note In addition to material re the formation and development of the North Harlem branch, the folder contains membership rosters, lists of proposed projects, and material re funding. Correspondents include the Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor, Henry Street Settlement’s Visiting Nurse Service, Adam Clayton Powell, Sr., Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., the Spelman Fund, Utopia Children’s House, the YMCA, and the YWCA.
 
North Harlem, New York Branch Miscellaneous Records, 1926-1929 Box 42, Folder 455
Note Includes agendas, memoranda, minutes of a African American mass meeting, programs, and publicity and sex education materials. Also included are outlines of addresses delivered to North Harlem groups.
Box 43
North Harlem, New York Branch Miscellaneous Records, 1930-1933 Box 43, Folder 456
Note Advisory group membership list, annual reports, attendance records, financial statements, lists of proposed projects, programs, and publicity materials. Also included are reports from the branch committee on Harlem churches.
 
Tuckahoe, New York Branch, 1931-1934 Box 43, Folder 457
Note Correspondence re the attempts to organize a Tuckahoe branch. Included are attendance records, membership lists, and discussions re financial problems.
 
Washington, D.C. Branch, 1929-1934 Box 43, Folder 458 to 459
Note In addition to attendance records and membership lists, the folder contains minutes of meetings. Topics discussed were authority and freedom, discipline, and sex education
 
National Council of Parent Education  
Note The National Council of Parent Education (1925-1949) was organized in 1925 at a CSAA-sponsored conference of agencies and groups working on problems related to the education of parents. At the close of the six-day conference, the participants decided to organize the Council. Its mission was to collect and disseminate research material for parent educators, form a clearing house for research, and to formulate qualifications of and training procedures for parent education workers. Prominent members of CSAA remained in the governing structure of the Council until its eventual merger with the National Council of Family Relations. The documents include the constitution, board of governors minutes and correspondence, financial records, and conference records.
Box 43
Constitution and Legal Papers, 1934-1947 Box 43, Folder 460
Note Includes certificate of incorporation, revised constitution and bylaws, and the certificate of change of name to the National Committee for Parent Education.
 
Minutes and Papers, 1936-1944 Box 43, Folder 461
Note In addition to minutes of the board and of the executive committee, the folder contains executive director reports re council programs, financial status, proposed budgets, and miscellaneous recommendations. Also included is material re the proposed merger with the Progressive Education Association.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1930-1937 Box 43, Folder 462
Note Includes conference programs, governing board reports, minutes of National Council of Parent Education meetings, press releases, reports to the Spelman Fund, and a pamphlet re the origin, purpose, and functions of Council. Also included are reports on leadership training for parent education groups.
 
Board of Governors, Correspondence and Papers, 1938 Box 43, Folder 463
Note The folder contains material re the proposed reorganization of the council and correspondence re grant proposals with the Whitney Foundation. Also included is a tentative plan for a national association dealing with family life. Among the correspondents is Eduard C. Lindeman.
 
Board of Governors  
Box 43
Correspondence and Papers, January-April, 1939 Box 43, Folder 464
Note Material re board meetings, board of governors elections, conferences, finances, grant proposals, and reorganization of the council.
Box 44
Correspondence and Papers, January-April, 1939 Box 44, Folder 465
Note Continued from previous folder
 
Correspondence and Papers, May-December, 1939 Box 44, Folder 466
Note In addition to correspondence re the dispersal of Council records to a commission of the American Council on Education, the folder contains material about the liquidation of the Council’s New York City office. Also included is material re proposed changes in the constitution.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1940 Box 44, Folder 467
Note Included is correspondence re plans to reorganize through a merger with either the National Conference on Family Relations or the Progressive Education Association. Among the correspondents is Eduard C. Lindeman, who warns of an "increased attack upon progressive education."
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1941 Box 44, Folder 468
Note Material re the proposed reorganization of the Council into a Commission on Family Life and Education within the Progressive Education Association. Correspondents include Rachel Davis-DuBois, F. H. LaGuardia, and Eduard C. Lindeman.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1942 Box 44, Folder 469 to 471
Note Material generated by the proposed merger of the Council with the Progressive Education Association and the subsequent decision to remain an autonomous organization.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1943 Box 44, Folder 472 to 473
Note In addition to correspondence with the committee on the revision of the constitution and bylaws, the folder contains material re the board of governors election, dues notices, meeting notices, and the nominating committee.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1944 Box 44, Folder 474
Note In addition to correspondence re the new executive director (Marian McDowell), the folder contains material re financial problems and a list of Council publications.
Box 45
Correspondence and Papers, 1945-1946 Box 45, Folder 475
Note Material relating to reorganization from a council of organizations to a committee of individuals. Related to this change is correspondence re Eduard C. Lindeman’s resignation from the board of governors. Also included is correspondence with the National Conference on Family Relations.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1947-1949 Box 45, Folder 476
Note Includes material about the Council's objectives, its methods of pursuing those objectives, and financial support. Material re the change of name of the organization is also included. Correspondents include the Association for Family Living, National Conference on Family Life, and the National Information Bureau.
 
Financial Records, 1936-1948 Box 45, Folder 477
Note Annual statements, routine records, and an accountant’s report are included.
 
Conferences, 1925 Box 45, Folder 478
Note Includes information re the origins of National Council of Parent Education.
 
Conferences, 1930 Box 45, Folder 479
Note Included are reports from the first biennial conference.
 
Conferences, 1938 Box 45, Folder 480
Note Material re a conference for professionals in the field of parent education.
 
Conferences, 1945 Box 45, Folder 481
Note Material re a symposium on "The Future of the American Family" and problems in the post=World War II era. Speakers included Eleanor Roosevelt, Lyman Bryson, and Mark McClosky.
 
Papers, 1926, 1934-1935, 1941 Box 45, Folder 482
Note In addition to parent education materials from the US Office of Education, the folder contains membership lists and Council articles re parent education.
 
Papers, 1943-1948 Box 45, Folder 483
Note Includes applications for membership, a list of voting members, and a questionnaire re the content of the National Council of Parent Education newsletter.
 
Papers, Membership, 1938-1948 Box 45, Folder 484 to 486
Note Included are applications for membership, a list of the board of governors, a geographical listing of National Council of Parent Education, and correspondence re dues. Also included is a list of university extension specialists in parent education, child development, and family life.