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Alfred O.C. Nier Papers, 1930-1996

Detailed Description of the Records

 Location  Title
 
Series 1. Biographical and Career Summary Information, 1919-1960. ()  
Note Series 1, Biographical and Career Summary Information, consists of a small set of files that Hoehler and his family maintained, apparently as a summary of his career, in effect an unbound scrapbook. Included are newspaper clippings, photographs, and selected documents that are grouped according to the various phases of his professional career. In each case, the photographs have been moved to separate folders.
Box 94
Education and early career circa 1919-1955 Box 94, Folder 826
Note Alumni documents from Central Manual Training High School (Philadelphia) and from Pennsylvania State University, and a brief article about Hoehler’s appointment at the Berry Schools in Rome, GA.
 
Cincinnati circa 1933-1936 Box 94, Folder 827
Note Correspondence, reports, and newspaper clippings from Hoehler’s tenure as director of the Cincinnati Department of Public Safety
 
Cincinnati - photos  Box 94, Folder 828
 
American Public Welfare Association circa 1936-1942 Box 94, Folder 829
Note Articles, reports, and newspaper clippings from Hoehler’s time as director of the APWA.
 
American Public Welfare Association - photos  Box 94, Folder 830
 
Army-Navy Committee circa 1940-1942 Box 94, Folder 831
Note Itineraries from Hoehler’s term on the Joint Army and Navy Committee on Welfare and Recreation
 
Europe circa 1942-1944 Box 94, Folder 832
Note A few articles and documents from Hoehler’s service with the Office of Foreign Relief and Rehabilitation Operations and the Division of Displaced Persons of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration.
 
Community Fund of Chicago circa 1946-1949 Box 94, Folder 833
Note Newspaper clippings from Hoehler’s term as director of the Community Fund of Chicago.
 
Community Fund of Chicago - photos  Box 94, Folder 834
 
Illinois Department of Public Welfare circa 1949-1953 Box 94, Folder 835
Note Newspaper clippings, awards, press releases, and speeches from Hoehler’s tenure as director of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare under Governor Adlai Stevenson.
 
Illinois Department of Public Welfare - photos  Box 94, Folder 836
 
Chicago circa 1953-1960 Box 94, Folder 837
Note Newspaper clippings, photographs and other documents primarily related to Hoehler’s position as consultant to Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley
 
Chicago - photos  Box 94, Folder 838
 
Series 2. Correspondence and Papers, 1917-1965. (Boxes 1-25, Folders 1-267)  
Note Series 2, Correspondence and Papers, includes some personal correspondence, but is composed largely of professional correspondence. Much of the material is closely related to that in Series 3, Articles, Speeches, and Related Materials.
 
Series 2.1 Chronological Correspondence  
Box 1
General Correspondence and Papers, 1917-1926 Box 1, Folder 1
Note Material stemming from Hoehler’s work with the YMCA and his tenure as a brigade athletic director for the US Army. The Berry Schools are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, 1927-1929 Box 1, Folder 2
Note Bulk of folder consists of congratulatory letters received by Hoehler upon his appointment as director of the Cincinnati and Hamilton County Welfare Department. Some YMCA and Cincinnatus Association business is also dealt with in this folder.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, 1930-1934 Box 1, Folder 3 to 5
Note Folders contain material re Berry Schools, the Cincinnatus Association, college reunions, and the recent economic collapse and continuing depression.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, 1935-1943 Box 1, Folder 6 to 7
Note Army Special Services Division, the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, and a proposed program for the exchange of social workers between Great Britain and the US are discussed. Folders also contain a detailed analysis of the suburban division of the Chicago War Fund Campaign, a funeral oration for Jan Masaryk, a memorial tribute to William Hodson, and Hoehler’s vita. Correspondence re Hoehler’s resignation as executive director of the Joint Army and Navy Committee on Welfare and Recreation, his resignation from the directorship of the American Public Welfare Association, his decoration for service in North Africa, and his desire to be part of the war effort is included as well. Herbert Lehman, Paul Kellogg, Louis Brownlow, and Charles P. Taft are subjects or correspondents.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, 1944 Box 1, Folder 8
Note Material sketches personnel and policy problems as well as the daily routine of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration. Also contained in this folder is a statement by the National Planning Association re social security, an article on the role of social agencies in the postwar period, a detailed description of the past and future projects of the American Film Center, and information re the proposed exchange of social work personnel between England and the US. Correspondents are Gertrude Springer, Loula Dunn, and Thomas Cooley, II (deputy director of UNRRA Division of Displaced Persons); Herbert Lehman is mentioned. Hoehler’s family correspondence is also in this folder.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, 1945 Box 1, Folder 9 to 10
Note Folders contain Hoehler’s letter of resignation from the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration’s Division of Displaced Persons. This and other papers contain discussions of UNRRA—its history, projects, public relations, problems of cooperation with other organizations, and the recruitment of American Field Service personnel. Folders also contain a statement of the American Council of Voluntary Agencies for Foreign Service re rights of displaced persons and a description of a new organization, American Youth for Europe, which began as an auxiliary of the Unitarian Service Committee. The preceding is accompanied by a letter from James Reston and information re Polish displaced persons, the effects of World War II on racial prejudice, the objectives and the programs of the American Council on Race Relations, the exchange between the US and the USSR of information re social services, and Hoehler’s biography. Letters from Mrs. Hoehler are included.
Box 2
General Correspondence and Papers, January, 1946 Box 2, Folder 11 to 12
Note Letters from Paul Kellogg, Lea Taylor, and others commend Hoehler for his work with the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and welcome him to the Chicago Community Fund. Papers also deal with UNRRA problems (particularly the plight of displaced Jewish and Polish people and the conditions in southeast Asia) and the American Film Center’s cooperation with the National Planning Association. The history of concern about juvenile and adolescent delinquency is also briefly described.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, February, 1946 Box 2, Folder 13
Note Letters of welcome and congratulations contain information re the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, the United Nations Organization, and the rice economy in Asia. Material about the children’s Crusade, an organization collecting food, toys, and money for war victims, is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, March, 1946 Box 2, Folder 14 to 15
Note A letter to Eleanor Roosevelt thanking her for her support of "non-repatriable" displaced persons is found with material re the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (displaced Europeans in China and the rice famine in Asia are mentioned), the American Social Hygiene Association’s interest in being included in Community Fund campaigns, the American Film Center’s activities, and the American Council on Race Relations proposal for employment and upgrading of minority workers. Trygive Lie, Paul Kellogg, and John Winant are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April, 1946 Box 2, Folder 16
Note Material re the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, the American Social Hygiene Association’s request to be included in Community Fund appeals, and the American Council on Race Relations budget. Mention of Eleanor Roosevelt, John Winant, Herbert Lehman, and Saul Alinsky is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, May, 1946 Box 2, Folder 17 to 18
Note Folders hold papers discussing aid to postwar Europe and Asia, international relations, the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, the UN, and efforts to collect and make clothing for Europe­ans. Herbert Hoover, Harry Truman, and Saul Alinsky are mentioned. A commencement address by Clemens J. France and a paper entitle "The Future of Private Child Caring Agencies" are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, June, 1946 Box 2, Folder 19
Note Material re the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and postwar problems accompany mention of the International Conference of Social Work and other routine correspondence. A description of the YMCA’s European situation is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, July, 1946 Box 2, Folder 20 to 21
Note Papers re the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration’s problems, particularly the organization’s impending termination and the situation in Hungary and China, accompany material re the formation of the International Refugee Organization. Comments about the Chicago Goodwill Industries’ relation to the Community Fund, a paper re the Illinois State Commission on Care of Chronically Ill Persons, and mention of Marshall Field, John Winant, and Helen Gahagan Douglas are also included in the folders.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, August, 1946 Box 2, Folder 22
Note Information re the exclusion of foreign relief agencies from the Community Fund appeal, a personal depiction of European postwar problems, a discussion of cooperation between public and private welfare agencies, a brief description of the American Council on Race Relations’ program, and letter to Saul Alinsky. Paul Lazarsfeld, John Winant, and Loula Dunn are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, September, 1946 Box 2, Folder 23 to 24
Note Papers describe postwar conditions in Hungary, the YMCA, problems within the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, and the difficulties of displaced persons management as the termination of UNRRA approached. A fact sheet on the American Council on Race Relations, material re the International Union of Local Authorities, a letter from Hoehler to Frances Perkins, and mention of LaGuardia, John Winant, and Henry Wallace are also contained in these folders.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, October, 1946 Box 2, Folder 25 to 26
Note Problems surrounding displaced persons management and work on the International Refugee Organization constitution are discussed in detail; international relations receive special emphasis in the discussions. Also included is correspondence about US policy re refugees in the US, an article re the UN, and a letter from Hoehler to President Truman. LaGuardia and Tom Clark, US Attorney General, are mentioned; Francis Perkins is a correspondent.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November, 1946 Box 2, Folder 27
Note Folder contains material re the YMCA in Poland, a research and education program about adolescent delinquency, Estonian refugees in the US, management consultant work, student leadership on campuses, the promotion of international and race relations, the future of Chicago and the need for good public personnel, and the history and problems of the American Film Center. Correspondence includes Hoehler’s statements in support of Emily Taft Douglas* candidacy for Congress as well as the use of unfilled immigration quotas for admitting refugees to the US. Helen Gahagan Douglas, Tom Clark, A. J. ("Dad") Elliott, and Loula Dunn are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, December, 1946 Box 2, Folder 28
Note The organization of the International Refugee Organization, the problems of Jewish refugees, and the situation in the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration as it approached termination are described; international relations are of especial note. A description of a proposed "organization audit" designed to evaluate the nonfinancial facets of not-for-profit corporations and Hoehler’s comments to Charles P. Taft, president of the Federal Council of Churches, about problems encountered in cooperative planning among civic and religious welfare groups are accompanied in this folder by mention of President Truman, Marshall Field, Loula Dunn, and Ralph Blanchard.
Box 3
General Correspondence and Papers, January, 1947 Box 3, Folder 29 to 30
Note Additional information re the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and the organization of the International Refugee Organization; material deals with diplomatic relations, especially British resistence to sending Jews to Palestine. The activities of the US Committee for the Care of European Children, the Menninger Foundation, increased expenditure in public welfare departments, and Hoehler’s support of the relocated Mirrer Yeshiva Central Institute are discussed. A short exchange of letters between Gertrude Springer and Hoehler and mention of Marshall Field, Ralph Blanchard, and Ogden Reid are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, February, 1947 Box 3, Folder 31
Note Problems re the organization of the International Refugee Organization, relations between the IRQ and the United National Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, and the possibilities for student aid to postwar Europe are described. Charles Taft, Adlai Stevenson, the League of Nations, and CARE are mentioned. A letter to Gertrude Springer and correspondence sent to Illinois Governor Green re a unified public welfare system are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, March, 1947 Box 3, Folder 32
Note Information re Congressional budget cuts, the US Employment Service activities, and the UN staff. Correspondence from Lea Taylor mentions the American Jewish Congress, anti-Semitism, and racism. Herbert Hoover, Eleanor Roosevelt, Marshall Field, UNESCO, and the Atomic Energy Commission are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April, 1947 Box 3, Folder 33
Note Further information re the US Employment Service activities and Congressional budget cuts accompanies mention of the role of social scientists in combating prejudice, a conference of local government personnel, Herbert Hoover, the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, and Chicago Mayor Kennelly.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, May, 1947 Box 3, Folder 34
Note Folder contains an informative letter from a UN official re the displaced persons problem; special emphasis is given to the disadvantages and merits of repatriation. Continued discussion of the organization of the International Refugee Organization and its relation to the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, a letter to Paul Kellogg, and mention of Charles Taft, Eleanor Roosevelt, Helen Gahagan Douglas are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, June, 1947 Box 3, Folder 35
Note Hoehler’s reply to the UN official’s comments on displaced persons and repatriation, his brief remarks re the relation of public and private agencies in community planning, a report re the US Committee for the Care of European Children fund raising campaign, information about the International Refugee Organization, and a report re the American Medical Association’s failure to implement its adopted program. Paul Kellogg and Eric Severeid are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, July-August, 1947  Box 3, Folder 36
Note Routine correspondence includes an exchange with Saul Alinsky re Community Fund allotments and directors. The United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration is mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, September-October, 1947 Box 3, Folder 37
Note Folder contains a history of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration written by Hoehler in which he outlines an alternative organization of UNRRA he had advocated during the formative stages of UNRRA. A detailed discussion of postwar Berlin and American aid to Germany by George McKibbon and an extended discussion of social security, particularly the potential for political manipulation within a totalitarian government, are included. A letter from Saul Alinsky after the death of his wife, Helene, and a letter to Senator Robert A. Taft discussing social security and aid to postwar Europe are also in this folder. Loula Dunn and the Chicago Film Council are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November, 1947 Box 3, Folder 38
Note A newsletter from George McKibbon, a US official in Berlin, discusses America’s role in postwar Europe, mentions the common fear of USSR domination of Europe upon US withdrawal, and describes the economic and social conditions in Germany. The postwar situation in Hungary and the National Municipal League are also discussed.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, December, 1947 Box 3, Folder 39
Note Displaced persons, the International Refugee Organization, the possibility of a council of social agencies in Washington, D.C., political maneuvering in the New York state welfare department, reviewing committees for public agencies, the National Municipal League, and the possibility of a merger of the American Association of Social Workers and the National Conference of Social Work are discussed. A detailed memorandum describing emergency relief in the 1930’s and plans for handling relief in the future, letters to Paul Douglas and Gertrude Springer, and mention of Loula Dunn, the Marshall Plan, Charles P. Taft, and Lyman Ford are also found in this folder.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, January, 1948 Box 3, Folder 40
Note A newsletter from George McKibbon, a US official in Berlin, describes the dire European economic situation, the Cold War, and education in postwar Germany. Folder also contains information re the National Municipal League and the relations between community funds and agencies funded by them; a discussion by A. J. Altmeyer on various forms of federal relief and public misinterpretation of such measures is also included. The preceding material is accompanied by a letter to Katharine Lenroot, a letter from Paul Douglas, and mention of Loula Dunn and the Chicago Film Council.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, February, 1948 Box 3, Folder 41
Note A brief discussion of public payment for services in private agencies accompanies routine correspondence which mentions a new organization, Friends of Democracy, and requests Hoehler to assist in the selection of a Public Welfare director for Milwaukee. The International Refugee Organization, the Marshall Plan, the US Committee of the Inter­national Conference of Social Work, and Charles P. Taft are mentioned.
Box 4
General Correspondence and Papers, March, 1948 Box 4, Folder 42
Note A letter from Mary Van Kleeck relates the interest and plans of some members of the National Conference of Social Work in issuing a public statement calling for international peace. Included with the letter is a statement, "Social Workers’ Challenge to Politics in 1948." Correspondence also contains Hoehler’s comments on the postwar European situation, the International Refugee Organization, and the Marshall Plan. Information re the National Municipal League and mention of the US Committee of the International Conference of Social Work are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April, 1948 Box 4, Folder 43
Note Additional news about European politics from George McKibbon, a US official in Germany. Information re the National Municipal League, the International Refugee Organization, and the International Conference of Social Work and a letter from Ralph Blanchard congratulating Hoehler on his planning for a National Conference of Social Work are also included in this folder.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, May, 1948 Box 4, Folder 44
Note Routine correspondence is accompanied by a telegram from Saul Alinsky re a packing house strike and information re the National Municipal League.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, June, 1948 Box 4, Folder 45
Note A note from Saul Alinsky, a letter to Frances Perkins on the occasion of a testimonial dinner in her honor, and correspondence with Herbert H. Lehman and Marshall Field. Correspondence with Field discusses his financial support of the Florence Crittenton Anchorage in Chicago. Information re the Boys Club of America, mention of the National Municipal League and a memorandum re the current status of the Citizens’ Civil Service Association of Illinois are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, July, 1948 Box 4, Folder 46
Note Folder includes discussion of the reorganization of the Federal Security Agency, fund raising for Mirrer Yeshiva Institute, and a community theater in a small Kansas town. Material from the Citizen’s Civil Service Association of Illinois is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, August-September, 1948 Box 4, Folder 47
Note The International Refugee Organization, Arab refugees in the Middle East, Ambassadors of Friend­ship, and Hoehler’s approval of an NBC program, "Marriage in Distress," are discussed. Folder includes a letter to Edith Abbott re the death of Sophonisba Breckinridge, a letter from the International Association of Chiefs of Police re the proper recognition of city police, and a letter to William Draper (Under Secretary of the Army) in which Hoehler offers his services for civil defense work. Material also contains criticisms of the Illinois governor’s administration.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, October-November, 1948 Box 4, Folder 48 to 49
Note Further information on the Arab refugee situation in the Middle East (Friends Service Committee, the Red Cross, and the Rockefellers are mentioned), the political situation of postwar Europe, the National Municipal League, and the Mirrer Yeshiva Institute. A letter from Jessie Binford in support of the current directors of Illinois correctional institutions, preliminary plans for a Latin American social work conference, memoranda from the Citizens’ Civil Service Association of Illinois, and correspondence with Ralph Blanchard and Paul Douglas are also included. James M. Yard, director of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, and the American Council on Race Relations are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, December, 1948 Box 4, Folder 50
Note Correspondence re hospital care (costs of and federal funding for) and Hoehler’s support of the Mirrer Yeshiva Institute. Folder also contains a speech about a probation service for children, material from the Illinois Society for Mental Hygiene re the mental health needs of children, a letter to Governor-elect Stevenson re staff appointments in the boys and girls reformatories, and letters to Senator-elect Paul Douglas and Congresswoman Helen Gahagan Douglas. Chicago Mayor Kennelly is mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, January, 1949 Box 4, Folder 51 to 52
Note The Arab refugee situation, American Public Welfare Association leadership problems, health insurance and hospital costs, the Chicago and National Urban League’s tax status, and the need within the International Conference of Social Work for South American participation are briefly discussed. Folders also contain considerable information about the Chicago Area Project’s work toward the prevention of juvenile delinquency and Chicago Community Fund matters viz. contributions, administrative budget, relations between donors and funded agencies, etc. Also included is mention of, or correspondence with, Saul Alinsky, Helen Gahagan Douglas, Paul Douglas, Adlai Stevenson, Loula Dunn, Charles P. Taft, Milton Eisenhower, Ralph Blanchard, and Katharine Lenroot.
Box 5
General Correspondence and Papers, February, 1949 Box 5, Folder 53
Note Bulk of folder is comprised of correspondence surrounding Hoehler’s leave of absence from the Chicago Community Fund in order to assume the directorship of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare. American Public Welfare Association problems, plans for the approaching National Conference of Social Work, Chicago Community Fund business and policies, and Hoehler’s ideas for the reorganization of Survey Associates are also described. Letters from Adlai Stevenson, Katharine Lenroot, and George McKibbin and letters to Paul Douglas and Paul Kellogg are included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, March, 1949 Box 5, Folder 54
Note Enclosed material includes Hoehler’s comments on patronage and civil service as well as an outline for a plan to conduct a management audit of mental hospitals. Saul Alinsky, Paul Kellogg, Eric Biddle, and Arthur Altmeyer are correspondents; Loula Dunn, Charles P. Taft, Edith Abbott, displaced persons, programs for juvenile delinquents, Encampment for Citizenship, and Ambassadors of Friendship are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April, 1949 Box 5, Folder 55
Note Routine correspondence is accompanied by a letter from Loula Dunn re Gertrude Springer’s birthday and exchanges re Illinois Department of Public Welfare matters.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, May, 1949 Box 5, Folder 56
Note Folder contains a statement of Hoehler’s support of the Chicago Council Against Racial and Religious Discrimination, information re the Ambassadors of Friendship (a private group giving aid to Europe), and letters from Gertrude Springer and Charles P. Taft. Marshall Field and Edith Abbott are men­tioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, June-August, 1949 Box 5, Folder 57
Note Statements of Hoehler’s support for the Chicago Council Against Racial and Religious Discrimination and the community organization department of the Chicago Urban League. Other material includes discussions of or information re the Illinois Department of Public Welfare (particularly the need for delinquency prevention programs), the YMCA World Service Campaign, the International Refugee Organization, and the Mirrer Yeshiva Central Institute. Correspondence from George Haynes is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, September-October, 1949 Box 5, Folder 58
Note An exchange between Hoehler and Senator Paul Douglas on several matters, but particularly re the proposed construction of a mental hospital. Displaced persons, the charging of patients for state hospital care in Illinois, Adlai Stevenson, Ralph Blanchard, and the American Public Welfare Association are mentioned. The preceding is accompanied by a letter from Loula Dunn and a letter to Michael M. Davis on his 70th birthday.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November-December, 1949 Box 5, Folder 59 to 60
Note Correspondence with Ralph Blanchard, Marshall Field re health insurance, and Herbert H. Lehman upon his election to the US Senate. Folders also contain comments re the changing role of public schools and a statement re welfare services to children and youth. Special attention in the latter is given to the relationship between public and private agencies. Displaced persons, the Illinois Department of Public Welfare, and Hoehler’s early interest in public service are mentioned. A newsletter from the Citizens Com­mittee on Displaced Persons is included as well.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, January, 1950 Box 5, Folder 61
Note Folder contains discussions of the Christian Rural Overseas Program, European refugees, government price supports for food commodities and increasing poverty, possible government reorganization in Greece, and publicity for the Illinois Department of Public Welfare. The National Citizens Commission for the Public Schools is mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, February-March, 1950 Box 5, Folder 62 to 63
Note Remarks and information re the American Public Welfare Association, the changing role of public schools, the Foreign Policy Association, and displaced persons legislation in the US. Also included are a memorandum from Leo Szilard re the development of an organization to study the international control of atomic energy, an invitation to Hoehler to serve on the White House Conference on Children and Youth, letters from Fred Hoehler, Jr., re political activities, and exchanges between Hoehler and both Richard J. Daley and Chicago Mayor Martin H. Kennelly. Loula Dunn is mentioned and a Citizens Committee on Displaced Persons newsletter is included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April-May, 1950 Box 5, Folder 64
Note Folders contain memoranda and correspondence circulated among the Emergency Committee of Atomic Scientists re a citizens inquiry into the conditions of peace; Leo Szilard is a correspondent, A detailed account of the US Senate debate on displaced persons legislation and brief discussions of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, the Mirrer Yeshiva Central Institute’s financial problems, Jewish people’s situation in the Middle East, and Marshall Field’s financial aid to the Chicago Florence Crittenton Anchorage are also included. Helen Gahagan Douglas and Loula Dunn are mentioned.
Box 6
General Correspondence and Papers, April-May, 1950 Box 6, Folder 65
Note (Continued from previous folder.)
 
General Correspondence and Papers, June-July, 1950 Box 6, Folder 66 to 67
Note Folders include Hoehler’s undated resignation to Governor Stevenson, information and questions re the Save the Children Federation’s clothing program, material re the US visit of German administrators, information re the Illinois Department of Public Welfare’s budgetary and merchandizing problems, and a detailed memorandum of the Emergency Committee of Atomic Scientists. Correspondence prior to Hoehler’s attendance of the International Conference of Social Work reflect his interest in displaced persons, mental hygiene, and the elderly. The American Public Welfare Association, Loula Dunn, and civil service are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, August-September, 1950 Box 6, Folder 68
Note Routine correspondence is accompanied by material re medical research, the extreme political pressures encountered in the administration of state mental institutions, political donations from Illinois Department of Public Welfare employees, the non-white population of Illinois state institutions, racial discrimination, and the plans for German officials’ Chicago visit. Biographical information re Dorothy C. Kahn is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, October-November, 1950 Box 6, Folder 69
Note Folder contains a speech Hoehler delivered at the Missouri Conference on Social Welfare on the past and future trends in social welfare. Correspondence between Hoehler and his son re a proposed television project is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November-December, 1950 Box 6, Folder 70
Note Folder contains an outline for a proposed international study of juvenile delinquency, Hoehler’s review of a report on Minnesota’s public welfare department, a follow-up report on Hoehler’s complaint re racial discrimination in an Illinois restaurant, and correspondence from Richard J. Daley. Loula Dunn and Hoehler’s election to the American Public Welfare Association presidency are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, January-February, 1951 Box 6, Folder 71
Note Information re public welfare in Greece, the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, and displaced persons, and Social Work Today in relation to questions of national loyalty. Mary Van Kleeck, Ralph Blanchard, and the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, March-April, 1951 Box 6, Folder 72
Note Material includes Hoehler’s comments and description re relations between the American. Public Welfare Association and the National Social Welfare Assembly (particularly the dissatisfaction of some APWA members with the Assembly), the civil defense work of Chicago and APWA, racial integration in state institution, staffs, the collection and payment plan for state hospital patients, and the "political" nature of public welfare departments. Joe Hoffer, Paul Kellogg, Loula Dunn, Sargent Shriver, Sherwood Eddy, World War II refugees, and America’s role in international affairs are mentioned. Folder also contains a letter to President Truman, the American Legion "Americanism Commission Report," and considerable miscellaneous correspondence re the physical, policy, and personnel problems of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, May-June, 1951 Box 6, Folder 73 to 74
Note Routine correspondence provides details of Illinois Department of Public Welfare problems and concern, e.g. personnel problems, a new payment plan for state hospital patients, chronic under staffing, and low salary ceilings. Folders also contain information re American Public Welfare Association fund raising and APWA disaffiliation from the National Social Welfare Assembly are especially emphasized. Included as well are a telegram ex­pressing Hoehler’s concerns re public inspection of public assistance records, a letter to Helen Keller upon her receipt of the Shotwell Memorial Award, an exchange with Elizabeth Wickenden re the aged, and information re community chests and the International Conference of Social Work. Hoehler’s letter congratulating President Truman for the removal of General MacArthur, a letter from Senator Paul Douglas re MacArthur, correspondence from Helen Gahagan Douglas, biographical information re Jane Hoey, and mention of James Brindle and civil defense work are also in these folders.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, July, 1951 Box 6, Folder 75
Note Illinois welfare department correspondence includes routine requests for special attention re individual state hospital patients, staff personnel problems, etc. Hoehler’s evaluation of the Illinois legislative sessions, information re aid to the disabled, and correspondence to Governor Stevenson are also included.
Box 7
General Correspondence and Papers, August, 1951 Box 7, Folder 76
Note Routine Illinois Department of Public Welfare correspondence is accompanied by Hoehler’s remarks re Louis Bronlow’s professional activities and Bishop Shell, information re the Library of International Relations and Illinois research re the treatment of mentally ill, and letters to Katharine Lenroot upon her retirement. Joe Hoffer is mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, September-October, 1951 Box 7, Folder 77
Note Folder contains information re Illinois’ establishment of separate state facilities for psychotic children, Chicago’s plans for civil defense, the International Film Bureau, public assistance, patients’ parents’ interest in the state mental institutions, a visit of Japanese officials to observe American public welfare departments, US foreign policy, and the National Midcentury Committee on Children and Youth. Also included is correspondence with Katharine Lenroot and Gertrude Springer, Hoehler’s reply to the charge that he had "sold out" to politicians as state welfare director, and mention of Leonard Mayo, Joe Hoffer, Roy E. Larsen, and Grace Abbott.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November, 1951 Box 7, Folder 78
Note Routine Illinois Department of Public Welfare correspondence is accompanied by discussion of insurance plans for state employees, a television broadcase by Governor Stevenson, the employment of conscientious objectors in state institutions, a Mew York Times series on public welfare, and a study of the needs of the elderly. Elizabeth Wickenden, Jane Hoey, Richard J. Daley, displaced persons, and the White House Conference for Children and Youth are mentioned. American Public Welfare Association matters are also discussed.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, December, 1951 Box 7, Folder 79
Note Rather detailed descriptions of the origins of the International Conference of Social Work and the publicity, personnel, and funding problems surrounding the administration of Illinois state hospitals. Adlai Stevenson, Loula Dunn, Herbert Emmerich, Karl Menninger, the Chicago Community Fund, and the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools are mentioned. A letter in which Fred Hoehler, Jr. outlines his opposition to proposed legislation that would make the names of public relief clients public is also contained in this folder.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, January, 1952 Box 7, Folder 80
Note Folder contains information re the formation of the Commission on Financing of Hospital Care (prospectus included), the organization of the Governor’s Committee on Problems of Aging, Illinois state hospitals’ work with the aged and mental illnesses, the Illinois Social Welfare Foundation, and the possible collaboration of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare and the International Film Bureau. Adlai Stevenson, Loula Dunn, Jane Hoey, Katharine Lenroot, the American Public Welfare Association, and ADC programs are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, February, 1952 Box 7, Folder 81
Note Routine Illinois Department of Public Welfare correspondence is accompanied by a progress report from the Commission on the Financing of Hospital Care and discussions of civil defense planning, housing for the aged, the American Public Welfare Association’s disaffiliation from the National Social Welfare Assembly, and the relations between the US Committee of the International Conference of Social Work and the NSWA. Hoehler’s response to the accusation of corruption in the Illinois state government is included. Ellen Winston is mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, March, 1952 Box 7, Folder 82
Note Routine Illinois Department of Public Welfare correspondence reflects the varied, problems facing the department, e.g., personnel questions, financial problems, and special requests on behalf of patients. Also included is information re the Commission on the Financing of Hospital Care, the administrative role of the Community Chest executive, civil defense, the American Public Welfare Association’s disaffiliation from the National Social Welfare Assembly, and the financing of the International Conference of Social Work. The increasing pressure on Adlai Stevenson to become a presidential candidate is reported.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April, 1952 Box 7, Folder 83
Note Material re the Illinois Social Welfare Foundation national civil defense planning, a US State Department conference on foreign affairs, and the Illinois Committee on Aging accompanies routine Illinois Department of Public Welfare correspondence. A report on volunteer services in the state psychiatric hospitals of Illinois is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, May, 1952 Box 7, Folder 84
Note Routine Illinois Department of Public Welfare correspondence contains information re the International Conference of Social Work, American Public Welfare Association activities, the Commission on the Financing of Hospital Care, and Hoehler’s position re the confidentiality of public assistance records. Louis Wirth and Adlai Stevenson are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, June, 1952 Box 7, Folder 85
Note Local and national civil defense planning, confidentiality of public welfare records, funding of the International Conference of Social Work, special Illinois facilities for psychotic children, and problems surrounding the directorship of the Illinois welfare department are discussed. Karl Wenninger, Albert Deutsch, Chester Bowles, and Adlai Stevenson’s possible presidential candidacy are mentioned.
Box 8
General Correspondence and Papers, July, 1952 Box 8, Folder 86
Note The wide variety of Illinois Department of Public Welfare problems, the funding of the International Conference of Social Work, the major areas of interest of the Commission on the Financing of Hospital Care, Adlai Stevenson’s nomination for the presidency, and Hoehler’s possible nomination for Illinois governorship are discussed. Notes from Lucy P. Garner, Helen Fuller, and Albert Deutsch are included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, August, 1952 Box 8, Folder 87
Note Bulk of folder is comprised of material generated as a result of Adlai StevensonTs nomination for the presidency. The national political situation and Hoehler’s possible candidacy for Illinois governorship are discussed. Folder contains as well cor­respondence from Arthur Altmeyer re various aspects of social security and a letter from Gertrude Springer commenting on the death of Ann Brenner and mentioning Helen Hall and Paul Kellogg. Information re the Commission on the Financing of Hospital Care, American Public Welfare Association matters, and the US Committee for the International Conference of Social Work is also included. Correspondence with Eric Severeid and Estes Kefauver and mention of Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., and displaced persons are also found in this folder.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, September, 1952 Box 8, Folder 88 to 89
Note Papers focus primarily on routine Illinois Department of Public Welfare problems and Stevenson’s presidential campaign; material re Stevenson’s presidential campaign includes comments on the national political situation and information re the accusation that Hoehler accepted illegal salary supplements while director of the welfare department. Displaced persons, the International Conference of Social Work, Hoehler1s position re unemployment insurance, Illinois juvenile detention homes, and the Illinois Social Welfare Foundation are also discussed. Ann Brenner, Gertrude Springer, and Eric Severeid are mentioned. A memorandum entitled "Some Comments on Health and Social Security in Relation to Political Policy" by Harry Becker is also included in these folders.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, October, 1952 Box 8, Folder 90 to 91
Note Material and information re Adlai Stevenson’s presidential campaign, Illinois Department of Public Welfare staff and administrative problems, the membership of the Commission on the Financing of Hospital Care, the Community Chest president’s proposal for a citizens’ conference on community planning, the nation’s health problems, and the Point Four program. A letter from Albert Deutsch is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November, 1952 Box 8, Folder 92
Note Folder contains Hoehler’s and others’ responses to Adlai Stevenson’s defeat as well as Hoehler’s candid remarks about the future of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare under the Republican governor-elect. Discussions re the staff and work of the Commission on Financing of Hospital Care, the future of the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools, and Karl Menninger’s possible work in behalf of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare; Hoehler’s response to the accusation that he violated the Hatch Act; and a letter from Charles H. Alspach re his dismissal from the UN because of his alleged questionable national loyalty are also included. Charles P. Taft and Marshall Field are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, December, 1952 Box 8, Folder 93
Note Material re Adlai Stevenson’s defeat in the presidential election, the lack of cooperation between the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools and the AFL, the financial support of the American Public Welfare Association, and the American Psychiatric Association’s proposal to urge state governors to concern their administrations with providing good care for the mentally ill. A progress report from the Commission on the Financing of Hospital Care and a letter to Karl Menninger are also included.
Box 9
General Correspondence and Papers, January, 1953 Box 9, Folder 94
Note Folder is comprised primarily of correspondence generated by Hoehler’s resignation from the Illinois Department of Public Welfare and his appointment as director of the Citizens of Greater Chicago. Herbert H. Lehman, Loula Dunn, Karl Menninger, Lucy P. Garner, and Charles P. Taft are mentioned or correspondents. A memorandum entitled "Why Negroes Should Vote the Democratic Ticket" is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, February, 1953 Box 9, Folder 95
Note Routine correspondence includes responses re the upcoming testimonial dinner in honor of Hoehler and Adlai Stevenson. A memorandum re citizen participation and political organization is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, March, 1953 Box 9, Folder 96
Note Comments re developments in the Illinois Department of Public Welfare under the Republican state administration that succeeded Adlai Stevenson’s. Folder also contains a copy of Briefing (a newsletter about UN activities) and information re corruption in the New York Democratic party, public relief records, and the Hew Republic. Elizabeth Wickenden discusses policital hostility threatening social security programs and suggests a supporting role for labor unions. A speech en­titled "Good Public Relations: An Aid to Good Government" by Joseph Clark, Jr., mayor of Philadelphia, is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April-May, 1953 Box 9, Folder 97
Note Folder contains information re Illinois mental health programs, Hoehler’s receipt of the University of Chicago Rosenberger Medal, political corruption in Chicago, the establishment of a Louis Wirth fellowship, and UNICEF activities in Illinois. Routine correspondence includes letters from Albert Deutsch and to Gertrude Springer, Russell P. Drake, Arthur Altmeyer, and James Reston. Bishop Bernard Sheil and Eduard Lindeman are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, June, 1953 Box 9, Folder 98
Note Discussion of mental health programs, Hoehler’s concern re alleged misuse of Illinois public welfare funds, Hoehler’s receipt of the University of Chicago Rosenberger Medal, and the anticipated deletion of the social welfare attache program from the US Foreign Service.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, July, 1953 Box 9, Folder 99
Note Routine correspondence includes a request from William Menninger for Hoehler to speak at the Menninger Foundation annual meeting, Hoehler’s comments re foreign aid and communism, a brief description of Illinois’ provisions for juvenile delinquents, and remarks re the American political situation. Adlai Stevenson is mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, August, 1953 Box 9, Folder 100
Note Brief remarks re Robert A. Taft’s death and Adlai Stevenson’s position on the Middle East and correspondence re Hoehler’s speech at the Menninger Foundation annual meeting. Correspondents include Charles P. Taft and Mrs. Edison Dick.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, September, 1953 Box 9, Folder 101
Note Material reflects Hoehler’s interest and work in mental health. Information re Citizens of Greater Chicago, an audit of the Menninger Foundation, and mention of Charles P. Taft, Adlai Stevenson, and Harold Stassen are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, October, 1953 Box 9, Folder 102 to 103
Note Responses to Hoehler’s written tribute to Gertrude Springer accompany material re child welfare and youth services legislation and the future of social security. Material from the Menninger Foundation annual meeting, including a comprehensive 10-year plan, is also contained in these folders. Arthur Schlesinger, Adlai Stevenson, Elizabeth Wickenden, and the New Republic are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November-December, 1953 Box 9, Folder 104 to 105
Note A letter to the Life editor re the judicial elections in Chicago and mention of Citizens of Greater Chicago, Harold Stassen, and Elizabeth Wickenden.
Box 10
General Correspondence and Papers, January, 1954 Box 10, Folder 106
Note National Planning Association, National Citizens Commission for the Public Schools, Clark Kerr, Edward R. Murrow, and Eric Severeid are mentioned,
 
General Correspondence and Papers, February, 1954 Box 10, Folder 107
Note Hoehler analyzes the requisite qualifications for a metropolitan mayor. National loyalty, Clark Kerr, and Loula Dunn are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, March, 1954 Box 10, Folder 108
Note Routine correspondence includes brief mention of the value of mental health programs and a letter from Albert Deutsch.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April, 1954 Box 10, Folder 109
Note Routine correspondence includes limited material re mental health and a detailed discussion of problems in Citizens of Greater Chicago.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, May, 1954 Box 10, Folder 110 to 111
Note Information re International Social Service activities, Citizens of Greater Chicago (particularly re the budget), the Corporate Foundation for Research and Training in Psychiatry, and the Powell Amendment. Material re the reorganization of the National Citizens Commission for the Public Schools as well as the Commission’s position on federal aid to schools is also included in these folders.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, June, 1954 Box 10, Folder 112 t0 113
Note Material re the National Citizens Commission for the Public Schools, fund raising for Citizens of Greater Chicago, and financing of UNICEF. Information re Illinois state mental institutions, a note from Charles P. Taft, and Hoehler’s letter accepting the job as consultant to the New World Foundation are also included in these folders.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, July, 1954 Box 10, Folder 114 to 115
Note Folders contain National Citizens Commission for Public Schools correspondence and information re Citizens of Greater Chicago and the Illinois Public Welfare Department’s management of state institutions. The New World Foundation, adult education, Elizabeth Wickenden, Adlal Stevenson, and Jane Hoey are subjects or correspondents.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, August, 1954 Box 10, Folder 116 to 117
Note Information re the Illinois Department of Public Welfare, international relations, Citizens of Greater Chicago, the New World Foundation, and Hoehler’s resignation from Citizens of Greater Chicago. Joe Hoffer, Karl Menninger, Adlai Stevenson, and the US Committee of the International Conference of Social Work are subjects and correspondents. A reprint re business management is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, September, 1954 Box 10, Folder 118 to 121
Note Folders are comprised primarily of material related to Hoehler’s resignation from Citizens of Greater Chicago and his association with the New World Foundation. Included are letters of congratulations, a description of the foundation, and Hoehler’s solicitation of advice re foundations. Comments re Illinois Public Welfare Department, Citizens of Greater Chicago, National Citizens Commission for Public Schools business, the financing of the International Conference of Social Work, and unemployment compensation are also contained in these folders. Lea D. Taylor and Karl Menninger are correspondents; Bishop Bernard J. Sheil and Louis Brownlow are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, October, 1954 Box 10, Folder 122
Note Material re Citizens of Greater Chicago, the National Municipal League, Illinois Voluntary Registration of Social Workers, the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools, the financing of UNICEF, and project proposals submitted to the New World Foundation. Also included are Hoehler’s rating of candidates for the California state director of social welfare. Sargent Shriver, Charles P. Taft, and Adlai Stevenson are mentioned. Letters from William Menninger and to Lucy P. Garner, Herbert H. Lehman, Lea D. Taylor, Richard J. Daley, and Karl Menninger are also included.
Box 11
General Correspondence and Papers, October, 1954 Box 11, Folder 123 to 124
Note (continued from previous folder.)
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November, 1954 Box 11, Folder 125 to 129
Note Material from Saul Alinsky re a broadcasting foundation and educational television, considerable information re Chicago activities during National Retarded Children’s Week, Hoehler’s suggestions to the Democratic National Committee re state welfare programs for possible use by Democratic governors, an article by Hoehler about mental health work in Illinois (prepared for the Research Council for Economic Security), and a letter in which Hoehler tenders his resignation from the US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Employment Security Federal Advisory Council. Also included are comments re the New World Foundation, the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools, Adlai Stevenson, and the Middle East. Correspondents include Herbert H. Lehman, Paul H. Douglas, and Lea D. Taylor; leters to Elizabeth Wickenden and Karl Menninger are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, December, 1954 Box 11, Folder 130
Note Folder is comprised primarily of material related to the New World Foundation, viz. descriptions of Hoehler’s advisory work, inquiries from parties interested in securing grants, and Hoehler’s replies to the same. Correspondence also contains Hoehler’s agreement to continue as a member of the US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Employment Security Federal Advisory Council and mentions Milton Eisenhower’s tenure at Pennsylvania State University. Also included are letters to Frank Stanton (commenting on CBS educational grants), Sherwood Eddy, and Adlai Stevenson; and a note from Otto Kerner is also in the folder.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, January, 1955 Box 11, Folder 131
Note Material re New World Foundation business, a National Planning Association project, the International Association of Personnel in Employment Security, Time_ magazine’s grants to educational institutions, the organization of a Chicago chapter of the American Society for Public Administration, and the National Municipal League. Folder also contains correspondence in which Hoehler urges Illinois Governor William Stratton to develop supportive programs for the White House Conference on Education, speculates on developing programs with industries’ "vice presidents for civic affairs," commends Edward R. Murrow on a recent broadcast, and discusses cooperation with Democratic governors with Karl Menninger. Candid remards re Saul Alinsky’s work and mention of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration are included. William Menninger is a correspondent.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, February, 1955 Box 11, Folder 132
Note The New World Foundation, the need for mental health programs (suggestions for state programs included), Saul Alinsky’s work, the establishment of the Citizen Information Service of Chicago, the American Society for Public Administration, the International Association of Personnel in Employ­ment Security, and the International Conference of Social Work are discussed. Illinois Governor William Stratton, Sherwood Eddy, and Milton Eisenhower are subjects or correspondents. A list of goals for the volunteers for Richard J. Daley’s mayoralty compaign is included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, March, 1955 Box 11, Folder 133
Note New World Foundation material (Hoehler’s correspondence with the board of directors, letters of inquiry re grants, and Hoehler’s replies to the latter), information re research into neuropsychiatric disorders of children, a proposal for a psychiatric clinic, a solicitation of Hoehler’s advice re foundation funding for the provisional organization of the National Assembly of Social Work, and discussion of the 1955 Chicago mayoralty race. Folders also include material from the international Association of Personnel in Employ­ment Security, the Illinois Voluntary Registration of Social Workers, and the Illinois Commission on Children and Youth; summaries of school adminis­tration studies; International Council on Personnel Development in Employment Security material; and a brief description of legislation re juvenile delinquency are also included. US Secretary of Labor James P. Mitchell, Sherwood Eddy, Walter White, Ralph Blanchard, and the CIO’s Community Service Committee are subjects or correspondents. Folders also contain Hoehler’s offer of assistance to Richard J. Daley in the 1955 mayoralty race.
Box 12
General Correspondence and Papers, March, 1955 Box 12, Folder 134
Note (continued from previous folder.)
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April, 1955 Box 12, Folder 135 to 136
Note Bulk of folder is comprised of New World Foundation material—correspondence with board of dir­ectors, summary descriptions of proposed projects, and Hoehler’s replies to applicants. Also included are Hoehler’s detailed suggestions to Mayor Daley re special civic committees and staff organization, correspondence with Karl Menninger re the possibility of Menninger writing a column for the New York Herald Tribune, an American Society for Public Administration report on budget office functions, and two articles by Elizabeth Wickenden re social service and defense mobilization and the role of voluntary agencies in community development. Sherwood Eddy, the National Municipal League, the US role in the International Conference of Social Work, the World Council of Churches, and the US Department of Labor Bureau of Employment Security Federal Advisory Council, and the US Committee for the World Federation for Mental Health are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, May, 1955 Box 12, Folder 137 to 138
Note Folders contain material re the New World Foundation, the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools, the National Citizens Committee for the World Health Organization, the Citizen Information Service of Metropolitan Chicago, public health concepts as taught at Harvard, Illinois Voluntary Registration of Social Workers, and Hoehler’s opposition to the institution of a state loyalty oath. A grant proposal from the Puerto Rico Institute of Family Relations and continued correspondence with Mayor Richard J. Daley are also included. Sherwood Eddy, Elizabeth Wickenden, Joe Hoffer, and Marshall Field are subjects or correspondents.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, June, 1955 Box 12, Folder 139 to 140
Note Primarily New World Foundation material, viz. Hoehler’s reports to the board of directors re proposed projects and replies to requests for funds. Also included are discussions of the Illinois Voluntary Registration of Social Workers, the Joint Negro Appeal, social security, and voluntary financial appeals for health programs. Hoehler’s correspondence with and suggested statements for Mayor Daley and a Council Against Racial and Religious Discrimination newsletter are also found in these folders.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, July, 1955 Box 12, Folder 141
Note New World Foundation business and continued advisory correspondence with Daley; the latter deals particularly with programs for alcoholics and derelicts, recreation programs, and the Mayor’s Committee on the UN. Correspondence with Adlai Stevenson reflects Hoehler’s continued interest in politics. The National Citizens Commission for Public Schools, and the Veterans Administration are mentioned.
Box 13
General Correspondence and Papers, August, 1955 Box 13, Folder 142
Note Material re the New World Foundation (including Hoehler’s comments on his impending departure) and Hoehler’s voluntary assistance to Mayor Daley. Charles P. Taft, Loula Dunn, the Joint Negro Appeal, an International Conference of Social Work project, and the national political situation are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, September, 1955 Box 13, Folder 143
Note Hoehler’s appointment as special consultant to Mayor Daley and his work with the mayor’s special civic committees are described. Folder also includes material re the New World Foundation and comments re the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools and federal aid to education. A letter to Frances Perkins and a speech, "The Impact of International Tensions on People," by Ed Corsi are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, October, 1955 Box 13, Folder 144
Note Folder contains material re New World Foundation business and Hoehler’s consultant work for Mayor Daley; the latter deals particularly with the Mayor’s Committee on the United Nations. A detailed description of a counselling program for potential high school dropouts and comments re the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools and federal aid to education, the Urban League, and the American Society for Public Administration’s need for an executive director are included as well. Letters to Charles Percy and Marshall Field and correspondence from William Menninger are also in this folder. George McKibbin is mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November, 1955 Box 13, Folder 145 to 146
Note Material stemming from Hoehler’s consultant work for the New World Foundation and Mayor Daley dominate the folder; the Mayor’s Committee on the United Nations and the possibility of a committee on juvenile delinquency receive special emphasis in the papers re Hoehler’s work for Daley. Folders also contain material re the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools, educational television (particularly in New York City), the career motivations of public school teachers, Community Fund budgeting procedures, the Cooperative League, increased expenditures in mental health institutions, and Illinois mental health institutions. Russell P. Drake, Sargent Shriver, William Menninger, and Bernice T. Van der Vries are correspondents; letters to Karl Menninger, Joe Hoffer, and Adlai Stevenson are included. Charles P. Taft and Roy Larsen are mentioned. Correspondence also contains Hoehler’s comments re federal aid to public schools, the White House Conference on Education, and the McCarran-Walter Immigration Law.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, December, 1955 Box 13, Folder 147 to 148
Note Folders contain material stemming from Hoehler’s consultant work for the New World Foundation and Mayor Daley; Hoehler’s work with the Chicago Civil Service Commission dominates the material re Hoehler’s work for Daley. The reorganization of the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools, Hoehler’s suggestions of persons for membership on a proposed women’s advisory committee for Stevenson, the Chicago police depart­ment, the Adult Education Council, and the Middle East and Foster Dulles are discussed. Marshall Field, Agnes Meyer, and Charles P. Taft are correspondents. A statement on human rights, an address by the Sears and Roebuck board of directors chairman re the national economic situation and slum prevention and clearance, a report re welfare and education programs in civil defense plans, and detailed material on financing schools and health services are also included.
Box 14
General Correspondence and Papers, January, 1956 Box 14, Folder 149 to 150
Note Material arising from Hoehler’s consultant work for the New World Foundation and Mayor Daley dominates the folders. Included as well is information re the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools (which became the National Citizens Council for Better Schools during January, 1956), civil service legislation, the Illinois Society for Mental Health, the history of the International Conference of Social Work, and the necessity and importance of minority employment. A questionnaire from the Institute for Religious and Social Studies re equality; tributes to Bernice T. Van der Vries, Roy Larsen, and Edward Ryerson; and a letter to George Gallup are included in these folders. Melvyn Douglas, Frank Stanton, and Russell P. Drake are correspondents. Adlai Stevenson is mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, February, 1956 Box 14, Folder 151
Note Material stemming from Hoehler’s consultant work for the New World Foundation and Mayor Daley dominates the folder. Work with Daley is reflected in correspondence re the Chicago Civil Service Commission, Chicago police department personnel policies, juvenile delinquency, the Committee on the Rehabilitation of Man, and newspaper publicity. Folder also contains comments and information re terms such as "public administration" and "welfare administration," Jerry Voorhis and the Cooperative League, the National Citizens Council for Better Schools, fluoridation, the Middle East, Russia, and CARE. Hoehler’s reply to the Institute for Religious and Social Studies questionnaire re equality and correspondence with Adlai Stevenson and Russell P. Drake are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, March, 1956 Box 14, Folder 152
Note Material re Hoehler’s consultant work for the New World Foundation and Mayor Daley dominates the folder. A financial report from the National Retarded Children’s Week campaign and information re the National Citizens Council for Better Schools, the National Municipal League, and civil service court cases are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April, 1956 Box 14, Folder 153 to 154
Note Folders contain papers re New World Foundation concerns and material arising from Hoehlerrs consultant work with Daley, e.g., detailed recommendations re the Chicago Civil Service Commission, plans for the Rehabilitation of Man treatment center for alcoholics, and comments re the city cleanup effort. Folders also include Hoehler’s evaluation of and proposals for the US Committee of the International Conference of Social Work; his comments re the National Citizens Commission for Public Schools, Roy Larsen, and the future of the National Citizens Council for Better Schools; minutes of the Illinois legisla­tive commission on mental health; and a statement by Mrs. Edith Sampson, "Is Gradualism the Answer to Integration?". Hoehler’s thoughts re new developments and problems facing contemporary social workers are also included. Adlai Stevenson, the American Society for Public Administration, and the Marion Hathway Memorial are mentioned. Correspondence to Sherwood Eddy, Charles P. Taft, and William Menninger and from Russell P. Drake is also found in these folders.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, May, 1956 Box 14, Folder 155
Note Folder contains papers re New World Foundation concerns and material arising from Hoehler’s consultant work for Mayor Daley; the latter material includes information re Chicago services and accommodations for the elderly. Information re the American Society for Public Administration, the National Municipal League, Illinois state mental institutions, the Chicago Youth Commission, the Chicago cleanup campaign, the Committee on the Rehabilitation of Man alcoholic treatment center, and the national political situation is also included. Martha M. Eliot and Illinois Governor William Stratton are correspondents.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, June, 1956 Box 14, Folder 156
Note Material generated by Hoehler’s consultant work for Mayor Daley, particularly the pertaining to the proposed Mayor’s Committee on Aging. The latter material includes lists of interested groups and suggested committee members, proposed goals, and suggested comments from Daley. Folder also contains material re civil service, the Citizen Information Service of Metropolitan Chicago, metropolitan cooperation in public services, southern migrants, delinquency, and a proposed committee on urban adjustment. New World Foundation material and letters to William Menninger, John Gardner, and Adlai Stevenson are included as well.
Box 15
General Correspondence and Papers, July, 1956 Box 15, Folder 157
Note Material generated by Hoehler’s consultant work for the New World Foundation and Mayor Daley. Folder contains brief description of the several existing and proposed civic committees and commissions, viz. those on aging, juvenile delinquency, urban adjustment, newcomers, and civil service. Hoehler’s resignation from the executive committee of the International Conference of Social Work, comments re the national political campaigns, and a statement in defense of Daley’s administration are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, August, 1956 Box 15, Folder 158
Note Some New World Foundation correspondence, but primarily material stemming from Hoehler’s consultant work for Daley, e.g., material re civil service, the Chicago cleanup campaign, American Indians, the Chicago police, and civic committees on aging and newcomers. Also included is material re current national political campaigns, viz. comments re Adlai Stevenson and alleged bribery in the Republican party and sketches of the national nominating conventions by John Steinbeck. The Chicago League of Women Voters and Jessie Jackson are mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, September, 1956 Box 15, Folder 159
Note Primarily material stemming from Hoehler’s consultant work for Daley, e.g., correspondence about civil service administration, the city cleanup campaign, and civic committees on juvenile delinquency and new residents. Hoehler’s involvement in the Adlai Stevenson campaign is also reflected in these papers; comments re Steinbeick’s political pieces about the national nominating conventions are included. New World Foundation material, correspondence with Herbert H. Lehman about writing a history of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, remarks re the Middle East political situation, Hoehler’s testimony to Loula Dunn’s work, his comments re citizen participation in the formation of school policy, a speech by John Nuveen re the failure of Eisenhower’s foreign policy, and letters to George Haynes and John Steinbeck are included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, October, 1956 Box 15, Folder 160 to 161
Note Material arising from Hoehler’s consultant work for the New World Foundation and Mayor Daley. Folder contents also reflect Hoehler’s involvement in the Adlai Stevenson campaign. Included are suggestions and resource material for Stevenson and a substantial letter from John Steinbeck re the necessity of speaking to voters1 emotions rather than their reason in political campaign speeches. Folders contain as well information re mental health care in Illinois, the Chicago Public Administration Clearing House, CARE, and the South Chicago Community Center. Correspondence to Charles P. Taft and a letter tendering Hoehler’s resignation from the Library of Inter­national Relations are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November, 1956 Box 15, Folder 162 to 163
Note Material stemming from Hoehler’s consultant work for the New World Foundation and Mayor Daley. Also included are comments re President Eisen­hower, Adlai Stevenson’s defeat, the Middle East, federal aid to public schools, Hungarian refugees, the Menninger clinic, and the use of social workers in schools. A letter to Marshall Field upon his father’s death, a letter to John Steinbeck re the recent presidential election and Steinbeck’s earlier suggestions re the Stevenson campaign, and a magazine article re the successful discharge of mental patients are also present in the folders.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, December, 1956 Box 15, Folder 164
Note Material generated by Hoehler’s consultant work with the New World Foundation and Mayor Daley. The Chicago Hungarian Relief Fund, southern migrants to Chicago, a proposed alcoholic treatment center, civil service, the Middle East, the National Conference on Exchange of Persons, and the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration are discussed. Herbert H. Lehman and Frank Stanton of CBS are correspondents. Letters to Joe Hoffer and Karl Menninger are also included.
Box 16
General Correspondence and Papers, January, 1957 Box 16, Folder 165
Note Material generated by Hoehler’s consultant work for Mayor Daley. Folder also contains New World Foundation material, a quarterly report from the Southern Regional Council, material from the Conference on Exchange of Persons, correspondence urging Dwight Eisenhower to appoint Adlai Stevenson to the UN, and a speech entitled "Planning for Corporate Aid to Education." Papers reflect Hoehler’s interest in the Middle East. William Healy is mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, February-March, 1957 Box 16, Folder 166
Note Folder includes an annual report of the UN Relief and Works Agency, a speech by Beardsley Ruml re college finances, a memorandum re the Democratic party’s position on election of judges, a telegram protesting Illinois Governor Stratton’s administration of state mental health funds, material re an institute on alcoholism, a speech by John Nuveen on US foreign policy, and correspondence with Herbert Lehman and Margaret Mead. Hoehler’s comments re the Middle East, the American Society for Public Administration, and UN work in Latin America are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April-May, 1957 Box 16, Folder 167
Note Some material stemming from Hoehler’s consultant work for Mayor Daley, but primarily miscellaneous correspondence. Material from the American Friends Service Committee and the reunion of the Harriman Mission for Economic Affairs, Hoehler’s comments re civil service and Illinois Governor Stratton’s administration of mental health funds, and mention of Loula Dunn and Sherwood Eddy are included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, June-August, 1957 Box 16, Folder 168
Note Folder contains Hoehler’s suggestions for the organization of the Illinois Commission on Children, fund raising information for the Illinois Citizens Committee on Education, a detailed discussion of foreign aid by John Nuveen, National Citizens Council for Better Schools correspondence, and material re a regional Council of State Governments conference on aging. Correspondence from Melvyn Douglas and the League of Women Voters and a telegram from Eunice and Sargent Shriver are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, September-October, 1957 Box 16, Folder 169
Note Routine correspondence includes some material stemming from Hoehler’s consultant work with Mayor Daley, information re UNESCO’s relations with international nongovernment organizations, mention of the Murray Seasongood lecture program on government, and correspondence from Karl Menninger, Sherwood Eddy (upon his retirement at age 85), and John Steinbeck (comments re the contemporary political arena).
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November-December, 1957 Box 16, Folder 170
Note Routine correspondence includes information re community health needs, excerpts from John E. Moss’ speech on freedom of information, correspondence commending Edward R. Murrow’s commentaries, material re the American Fund for Psychiatry, an exchange re the development of an "administration of community affairs’ graduate training program, and a letter to Sargent Shriver re persons interested in and knowledgeable about mental retardation. Minutes of the Inter­national Union of Local Authorities council meeting, an invitation to Hoehler to particpate in a study conducted by the National Manpower Council, material re work of the Governor’s Committee for the Refugee Program, and congratulatory letters for Hoehler’s selection as one of the 100 outstanding Chicagoans chosen by the Jesuit Centennial Citation Jury are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, January, 1958 Box 16, Folder 171
Note National Citizen Council for Better Schools correspondence re the Better Schools campaign, information re the Citizens Public Personnel Association Good Government Award, Hoehler’s comments re the merging of Cook County and Chicago welfare departments, and a letter to Adlai Stevenson re Martha Eliot’s efforts to establish a Marshall Field chair at Harvard University.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, , February-March, 1958 Box 16, Folder 172
Note Folder includes letters to Charles P. Taft, Eric Severeid, and Adlai Stevenson and correspondence from Martha Eliot and William Menninger. Mention of Anglo-American relations, mental health care, and the League of Women Voters is also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April, 1958 Box 16, Folder 173
Note Routine correspondence is accompanied by a letter to William Menninger re an upcoming visit, a letter from the South Chicago Community Center re Trumbull Park disturbances, a draft of a university curriculum for community affairs (Hoehler’s response included), material about the Menninger Foundation, an acknowledgment from the American Friends Service Committee for Hoehler’s signing of a letter protesting nuclear testing, and Hoehler’s review of Louis Brownlow’s A Passion for Anonymity.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, May, 1958 Box 16, Folder 174
Note Routine correspondence is accompanied by an analysis of the Japanese involvement in World War II, a summary report of a National Conference on Social Welfare session on coordination of physical and social planning in metropolitan areas, comments re international relations (John Nuveen on the Middle East and Southeast Asia), material re the Cooperative League, and additional information re the developing University of Pittsburgh course on community affairs. Hoehler’s work with the Immigrants’ Protective League is reflected, Adlai Stevenson is mentioned, and a letter from James B. Conant is included.
Box 17
General Correspondence and Papers, June, 1958 Box 17, Folder 175
Note Folder includes comments re World Mental Health Year, similarities between current civil defense work and the World War II experience with displaced persons, and the Cooperative Foundation. Cooperative Foundation material deals particularly with the establish­ment of a university professorship in the field of cooperatives. Hoehlerfs resignation from the Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago is also contained in the folder.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, August, 1958 Box 17, Folder 176
Note Material re the Republican administration of the Illinois welfare department, the Cooperative League’s proposed programs, the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration, the Adult Education Council, the International Film Bureau, and the need for continued education for administrators. Also included are mention of the League of Women Voters, a letter requesting Hoehler to ask Adlai Stevenson to serve on the US Committee for the International Conference of Social Work, and the Committee on Illinois Government report on mental health care.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, September, 1958 Box 17, Folder 177
Note Routine correspondence is accompanied by a letter to Adlai Stevenson re the US Committee of the International Conference of Social Work, a grant proposal from the National Conference on Social Welfare for a study of the function of conferences, correspondence re fund raising for the Council on Foreign Relations, and information re a national institute of labor education.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, October, 1958 Box 17, Folder 178
Note An extended paper entitled "Philosophy and the Public Interest" and correspondence re the Murray Seasongood lecture series on government.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November-December, 1958 Box 17, Folder 179
Note Folder contains Hoehler’s resignation from, his position of acting president of the Mental Health Society of Greater Chicago, a letter to Frances Perkins which mentions New Deal programs, correspondence with Helen Hall upon Paul Kellogg’s death, and exchanges re the Murray Seasongood lecture series on government. Also included are Hoehler’s comments on a paper entitled "Philosophy and the Public Interest," information re the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration, and material re a candidate for the Good Government Award presented by the Citizens Public Personnel Association. Save the Children Federation is mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, January-March, 1959 Box 17, Folder 180 to 181
Note Folders contain information re the Charles E. Merriam Fellowship, a copy of the Minneapolis Fair Employment Practice Commission Report, a paper on administrative problems of the Chicago public schools, Hoehler’s review of Louis Brownlow’s A Passion for Anonymity, and correspondence with Gertrude Sturges. Folder contents also reflect Hoehler’s cooperation with the US Committee of the World Federation for Mental Health.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April-June, 1959 Box 17, Folder 182
Note Routine correspondence is accompanied by a discussion of policies re licensing of homes for the aged, minutes from an Illinois Association for Mental Health meeting, financial statements and a budget from the International Union of Local Authorities, a program from a conference on aging, and a letter to Adlai Stevenson re human relations and government. Folder also contains references to Hoehler’s work at the House of Correction, material re the Citizens Public Personnel Association of Illinois, and Congressional testimony on problems of aging.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, July-December, 1959 Box 17, Folder 183
Note Brief references to Hoehler’s work at the House of Correction and the dissolution of the National Citizens Council for Better Schools, material re the US Committee of the World Federation for Mental Health, remarks to Gertrude Sturges re qualifications of public welfare directors and advisory boards, and a letter to George Stevenson on his retirement from the National Association for Mental Health. Notes to Charles P. Taft and Margaret Mead are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, January-February, 1960 Box 17, Folder 184
Note Primarily routine correspondence stemming from Hoehler’s civic committee work for Mayor Daley. Mention of Adlai Stevenson and the demise of the National Citizens Council for Better Schools, an article re the role of administrators, and an analysis and evaluation of the National Conference on Social Welfare are also included.
Box 18
General Correspondence and Papers, March-May, 1960 Box 18, Folder 185
Note Primarily material related to Hoehler’s civic committee work for Mayor Daley. Folder also contains information about and mention of the reorganization of the Chicago police department, Adlai Stevenson as a presidential candidate, the Middle East, the death of Beardsley Ruml, and the International Union of Local Authorities.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, June-July, 1960 Box 18, Folder 186
Note Bulk of material stems from Hoehler’s work for Mayor Daley, particularly from his work with the Commission on Senior Citizens and the House of Correction. Comments re the Middle East and Adlai Stevenson and financial reports from the International Union of Local Authorities are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, August-October, 1960 Box 18, Folder 187
Note Material arising from Hoehler’s work for Mayor Daley. Comments re penology and the House of Correction are included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, November-December, 1960 Box 18, Folder 188
Note Routine correspondence includes material re the Mayor’s Commission on Senior Citizens, a letter to Archibald MacLeish re his participation in the Jane Addams’ centenary, and material from an institute on social security.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, January-March, 1961 Box 18, Folder 189
Note Routine correspondence re the upcoming Chicago exposition for senior citizens. Folder also contains Hoehler’s comments re the Illinois public welfare department and the efficiency and alleged mistreatment of inmates at the House of Correction. A memorandum on the Middle East economic situation, several letters to Sargent Shriver, and mention of the American Society for Public Administration are included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April-June, 1961 Box 18, Folder 190
Note Routine correspondence stemming from Hoehler’s consultant work for Mayor Daley, particularly from his work with the Mayor’s Commission on Senior Citizens, Reports re the identification, treatment, and reha­bilitation of drug addicts and material on govern­mental health insurance are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, July-December, 1961 Box 18, Folder 191 to 192
Note Routine correspondence arising from Hoehler’s consultant work for Mayor Daley includes an Illinois report on drugs and several reports re the aged and illness, the aged and community services, etc. Folders also contain material from a White House Conference on Aging and a speech on human relations.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, January-March, 1962 Box 18, Folder 193
Note Routine material stemming from Hoehler’s consultant work for Daley, particularly from his work with the Mayor’s Commission on Senior Citizens. Letters of resignation from his position as secretary of the Chicago police board and from membership in the Washington, DC, Metropolitan Club are included; Hoehler resigned from the Metropolitan Club in protest of its policies of racial discrimination. Folder also contains Hoehler’s testimony to Daley’s accomplishments as mayor and material re Cook County procedures for commitment of the mentally ill.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, April-August, 1962  Box 18, Folder 194
Note Primarily material pertaining to the Chicago "Adventures in Living" exposition which was held as part of Senior Citizens Week.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, September-December, 1962  Box 18, Folder 195
Note Material re a television series on retirement and the Chicago "Adventures in Living" exposition held to celebrate Senior Citizens Week. Adlai Stevenson and Eleanor Roosevelt are mentioned. Hoehler’s response to the idea of a domestic peace corps and his comments on his own retirement are included.
Box 19
General Correspondence and Papers, January-April, 1963  Box 19, Folder 196
Note Folder contains evaluations of past "Adventures in Living" expositions and plans for the next Senior Citizen Week. Information re the Robert A. Taft Institute on Government and Hoehler’s testimony to Mayor Daley’s accomplishments as mayor are also included.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, May, 1963-August, 1964 Box 19, Folder 197
Note Material re the Mayor’s Commission on Senior Citizens with which Hoehler continued to work in his semi-retirement and Hoehler’s letter of retirement from the Illinois Association for the United Nations. Lea D. Taylor is mentioned.
 
General Correspondence and Papers, undated Box 19, Folder 198 to 199
Note Folders contain miscellaneous material re hospital management training, a proposed institute on industrial civilization, and Chicago Boys Clubs. Proposed legislation by Hoehler re legal means for compelling hus­bands to support wives and dependent relatives, a letter from Sargent Shriver, and mention of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (especially in China) are also included.
 
Series 2.2 Correspondence, Alphabetical by Correspondent  
Box 19
Sherwood Eddy, 1954-1957 Box 19, Folder 200
Note Much of the material pertains to Eddy’s interest in the New World Foundation. Folder also contains a chapter from Eddy’s forthcoming book, How to Live; Eddy thought the chapter might be developed into an book-length attack on capitalism. Articles by Eddy re Israel and communications from another world received in a sitting with Arthur Ford, are included as well.
 
Frank Galeana, 1947-1948 Box 19, Folder 201
Note Letters re a bad check issued to Hoehler by Galeana.
 
David Hunter, 1946-1952 Box 19, Folder 202
Note Correspondence related to Hunter’s work in postwar Germany and with UNICEF. Documents on public welfare in postwar Germany and UNICEF plans in Latin America are included. Adlai Stevenson’s presiden­tial candidacy and election defeat are mentioned.
 
Joel Hunter, 1945-1949, 1955 Box 19, Folder 203
Note Primarily material re the delay and final refusal (on the grounds of loyalty questions) of Hunter’s application to work in Germany as a consultant. Hunter was the past secretary of the United Charities of Chicago. William Healy, the Menninger Foundation, psychical research are mentioned. and
 
Karl and William Menninger, 1953-1963 Box 19, Folder 204 to 205
Note Material contains reference to the Menninger’s consultant work for the Illinois Department of Public Welfare and Democratic governors. Comments and discussion re the idea of a "temple of faith, philosophy, and beauty"; Karl Menninger’s writing of a column about mental health for the New York. Herald-Tribune; the New World Foundation; and the death of Charles Menninger are included. Charles P. Taft, Bishop Bernard Sheil, and Adlai Stevenson are mentioned and Karl Menninger’s "Reading Notes" are contained in these folders.
 
George Soloveytchik, 1946-1964 Box 19, Folder 206 to 207
Note A Russian-born British author, journalist, and lecturer, Soloveytchik consulted Hoehler re his repeated lecture tours in the United States. Routine correspondence re tour dates and accomodations contains mention of Paul U. Kellogg, Jan Masaryk, and Adlai Stevenson.
Box 20
Adlai Stevenson, 1946-1949 Box 20, Folder 208 to 209
Note Primarily material stemming from Hoehler’s close association with Stevenson during his gubernatorial campaign and administration. Much of the material deals with Illinois Department of Public Welfare matters, especially personnel problems and developing program plans (a proposal for a children’s treatment center is included). Also included are Hoehler’s suggestions to Stevenson for speeches re mental health, displaced persons, civil service, etc. a discussion contrasting voluntary agencies and public administration; Stevenson speeches re state government and organized labor; reports on the legislative session and development during Stevenson1s first year in office; and mention of the need for change in the Illinois Department of Public Safety.
 
Adlai Stevenson, 1950 Box 20, Folder 210
Note Primarily exchanges with Stevenson re Illinois Department of Public Welfare administrative and personnel problems and proposed programs. A detailed discussion about the location of responsibility for public mental health programs (i.e., with the welfare department of the health department), an extensive memorandum re the needs of the elderly in Illinois, Hoehler’s undated resignation from the directorship of the welfare department, and newspaper clippings are included. A yearly report re Stevenson’s administration is also in this folder.
 
Adlai Stevenson, 1951 Box 20, Folder 211
Note Folder contains discussions of confidentiality of public assistance records, salary ceilings for state government department directors, and the miscellaneous problems and programs of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare. Clippings, Stevenson speeches before the American Public Welfare Association and the National Association of Mental Health, and a public report on Stevenson’s first two years as governor are also included.
 
Adlai Stevenson, January-August,952 Box 20, Folder 212
Note Exchanges with Stevenson and other reflect the growing support for Stevenson’s presidential candidacy leading to his nomination by the Democratic party. Such issues as eligibility for social security benefits and the confidentiality of public assistance records are discussed in speeches and letters. Letters to Helen fuller of the New Republic and from Karl Menninger and Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. are included. Stevenson’s presidential nomination acceptance speech, a progress report on the Illinois Department of Public Welfare, and Hoehler’s suggestions to Stevenson of Senator William Fullbright as a running mate are also included.
 
Adlai Stevenson, September, 1952 Box 20, Folder 213
Note Primarily correspondence with persons involved or interested in Stevenson’s presidential campaign. Clippings, plans and suggestions and several Steven­son campaign speeches are contained in the folder. Mention of a fund controversy and material re mental health in Illinois are also included.
 
Adlai Stevenson, October-December, 1952 Box 20, Folder 214
Note Correspondence with persons interested and involved in Stevenson’s presidential campaign. Material contains suggestions re the campaign (including Lester B. Granger’s recommendation that Stevenson take a more definite stand on civil rights), an analysis of audience reaction to a Stevenson speech, testi­monies in support of Stevenson, and ideas re the reorganization of the Democratic party. Mention of Senator Joseph McCarthy, comments re Stevenson’s election defeat, and the accusation that Hoehler violated the Hatch Act are also included.
 
Adlai Stevenson, 1953 Box 20, Folder 215
Note Material includes Hoehler’s comments re his four year association with Stevenson, the problems of the Illinois Democratic party, and the possibility of Stevenson’s touring the United States to ascer­tain and analyze national problems. Folder also contains numerous invitations for Stevenson to talk, remarks re the Middle East, and Stevenson articles (including a series written after his world tour).
 
Adlai Stevenson, 1954-1955 Box 20, Folder 216
Note Folder reflects Stevenson’s and Hoehler’s interim work in the area of social welfare for the Democratic party and includes a Stevenson speech on McCarthyism, Hoehler’s suggestions re issues in Stevenson’s accomplishments in social welfare as governor of Illinois.
Box 21
Adlai Stevenson 1956 Box 21, Folder 217
Note Bulk of material stems from Stevenson’s presidential campaign. Background material on the Middle East, old age assistance, federal reserve policy, disability insurance, and education and Hoehler’s suggestions re issues and resource people are included. Folder also contains Hoehler’s comments re Stevenson’s election defeat.
 
Adlai Stevenson, 1957-1963 Box 21, Folder 218
Note Old acquaintances and the New World Foundation are mentioned. A speech re the necessity of foreign aid is included.
 
Adlai Stevenson, undated Box 21, Folder 219
Note Folder contains Hoehler’s notes on mental health, a discussion of aid to cities, and a campaign speech dictated by Helen Gahagan Douglas for Stevenson to use when talking to women’s groups.
 
Newspaper Clippings, Adlai Stevenson, 1952, 1960-1961, 1965 Box 21, Folder 220
 
US Congressmen, 1949-1952 Box 21, Folder 221
Note Primarily exchanges with Senators Paul H. Douglas and Scott W. Lucas re such matters as social security, a coal shortage, the McCarran Immigration Bill, special building programs, and the tendency of lower level governments to direct problems to higher levels of government.
 
Series 2.3 Correspondence, Alphabetical by Topic  
Box 21
Alden, Michigan, 1950-1961 Box 21, Folder 222
Note Primarily material re the upkeep of the Hoehler’s summer cabin in Alden, Michigan.
 
American Voluntary Foreign Relief, 1946-1948 Box 21, Folder 223
Note Limited correspondence re the activities and projects of several American organizations involved in voluntary foreign relief after World War II. The Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid, War Relief Services of the National Catholic Welfare Conference, American Overseas Aid, Inc., and the American Council of Voluntary Agencies for Foreign Service, Inc. are mentioned.
 
Berry Schools, 1946-1956, 1965 Box 21, Folder 224
Note Correspondence urging Hoehler, a former staff member of Berry Schools, to return to the staff, speak at several occasions, and help the school’s fund raising efforts.
 
Birthday Party, 1961-1962 Box 21, Folder 225
Note Letters of congratulations and thanks arising from a surprise birthday party given Hoehler in June, 1961. Material re the establishment of a Fred Hoehler fund is also included.
 
Chicago Department of Buildings, 1953-1955 Box 21, Folder 226
Note Material includes information re in-service training and the programs and activities of the department.
 
Chicago Housing Authority, 1957 Box 21, Folder 227
Note Letters and clippings re the controversy surrounding the Chicago Housing Authority’s board personnel and the director’s resignation. Hoehler was interested in the directorhsip when it was apparently to become vacant.
 
Chicago Human Relations Commission: Thomas and Eleanor Wright Memorial Award, 1961 Box 21, Folder 228
Note Material re Hoehlerfs receipt of the award from the Human Relations Commission in recognition of his outstanding professional work in human relations in Chicago.
Box 22
Chicago Police Department, 1948 Box 22, Folder 229
Note Miscellaneous material re the reorganization of the police department, alleged inefficient administration, and a social education program for policemen.
 
Cincinnati Welfare Activities, 1937 Box 22, Folder 230
Note Correspondence contains material detailing some of the projects and developments in welfare services in Cincinnati while Hoehler was director of the city’s welfare and safety departments. Included are minutes of the Permanent Committee on Stabilizing Employment(1928-1929) and a summary history of organizational and program changes in the Cincinnati and Hamilton County welfare department.
 
Committee for a National Trade Council, 1956-1963 Box 22, Folder 231
Note Because of his well known interest in international affairs, Hoehler received material re proposed legislation on international trade policy.
 
Congratulatory Letters, October, 1933 Box 22, Folder 232
Note Letters received upon Hoehler’s appointment as director of the Department of Public Safety for Cincinnati.
 
Congratulatory Letters, November, 1933 Box 22, Folder 233
Note Letters received upon Hoehler’s appointment as director of the Department of Public Safety for Cincinnati. Folder also includes Hoehler1s acknowledgements of the many letters.
 
Congratulatory Letters, 1935 Box 22, Folder 234
Note Letters received upon Hoehler’s acceptance of the directorship of the American Public Welfare Association. Folder also includes Hoehler’s resignation letter from the directorship of public safety in Cincinnati and city manager Dykstra’s acceptance of the resignation.
 
Congratulatory Letters, 1949 Box 22, Folder 235
Note Letters received upon Hoehler’s acceptance of the directorship of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare.
 
Congratulatory Letters, 1953-1955 Box 22, Folder 236
Note Letters of appreciation re Hoehler’s past work and congratulations upon his association with Citizens of Greater Chicago and Mayor Daley’s administration.
 
Dixon-for-Governor Committee, 1952 Box 22, Folder 237
Note Material reflects Hoehler’s support for Dixon; folder also includes plans for a broadcast on welfare and Dixon’s itinerary.
 
Employment for the Elderly, 1957-1958 Box 22, Folder 238
Note Memoranda re services and policies of the Illinois State Employment Service and a report on a vocational program for the aged conducted by the Jewish Vocational Service.
 
Employment Inquiries and Referrals, 1946-1962 Box 22, Folder 239
Note Inquiries re employment opportunities directed to Hoehler.
Box 23
Employment Inquiries and Referrals, 1946-1962 Box 23, Folder 240 to 243
Note (continued from previous folder.)
 
Foundations, 1950-1964 Box 23, Folder 244
Note Miscellaneous lists of foundations.
 
Health Insurance Plan for Greater Chicago, 1953-1954 Box 23, Folder 245
Note Material reflects preliminary work done by an ad hoc group on behalf of a health insurance plan for Chicago. Reports and an outline of the proposed services are included.
 
(Joel) Hunter’s Occasional Group, 1947, 1951 Box 23, Folder 246
Note Primarily material re the arrangement of a dinner honoring Hunter, the "dean" of Chicago social workers, upon his retirement.
 
Immigrant Service League: Esther Kohn Award, 1961 Box 23, Folder 247
Note Folder contains material re Hoehler’s receipt of the Esther Kohn Award; the award was given by the Immigrant Service League in recognition of Hoehler’s outstanding contributions to service for immigrants.
 
Immigration, 1953-1957 Box 23, Folder 248
Note Miscellaneous correspondence includes material from several committees on immigration and citizenship and newspaper clippings re increasing the US immigration quota.
Box 24
International Association of Personnel in Employment Security, 1954-1955 Box 24, Folder 249
Note Material re a proposed project for professional development and training of personnel in the field of employment security.
 
Meetings, 1949-1954 Box 24, Folder 250 to 255
Note Invitations to public and formal meetings from a wide variety of organizations.
 
Metropolitan Government, 1958 Box 24, Folder 256
Note Miscellaneous material includes an invitation to participate in a conference, a report by the City Club of Chicago on penal facilities, and a publication re the Metropolitan Regional Council of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut.
 
Municipal Manpower Commission, 1961 Box 24, Folder 257
Note Material about the commissions’ research and projections re future municipal personnel needs. Folder contains a request for Hoehler1s advice and the urban personnel survey conducted for the commission by the American Society for Public Administration.
 
New Jersey Public Health and Welfare, 1954-1956 Box 24, Folder 258
Note After advising the New Jersey governor and appropriate officials re candidates for health and welfare jobs in New Jersey, Hoehler continued his interest in the governor’s plans for mental health programs and facilities.
 
New York City Welfare and Health Council, 1949, 1953, 1956 Box 24, Folder 259
Note Bulk of material stems from the offer of employment extended to Hoehler by the council. Information re the council’s budget and personnel practices and the Illinois Youth Commission is included.
Box 25
Nursing Study, 1945-1946 Box 25, Folder 260
Note Prospectus for a study of the structure, financing, etc. of six national nursing organizations.
 
Pennsylvania State College, 1948-1958 Box 25, Folder 261
Note Folder contains material re alumni reunions, an advisory group for the Pennsylvania State Institute of Local Government, the establishment of a graduate program in public administration, and speaking invitations.
 
Political Campaigns, 1954-1960 Box 25, Folder 262
Note Letters and clippings re several Illinois campaigns, although some material about Adlai Stevenson’s presidential campaign and John F. Kennedy is also included. Papers contain Hoehler’s comments and advice to mayoralty candidate Richard J. Daley and speeches on his behalf.
 
Public Administration Education, 1954 Box 25, Folder 263
Note An advocate of continuing education for public administrators, Hoehler was interested in a proposal for a center for training and research in government and administration. The proposal is included in the folder.
 
Reorganization of Illinois State Welfare Services, 1948-1949 Box 25, Folder 264
Note Folder contains minutes and reports of a citizens group concerned with the reorganization of Illinois state welfare services. Proposed plans for reorganization, Hoehler’s suggestions to Adlai Stevenson for speeches and personnel, and memoranda on mental health are also included.
 
Roosevelt University, 1953-1956 Box 25, Folder 265
Note Folder contents reflect Hoehler’s interest in and support of the school. Material re fund raising, a fellowship for an African Rhodesian, the university’s accreditation, and an advisory committee for a graduate program in public administration is included.
 
United Nations, 1946-1952 Box 25, Folder 266
Note Interested in international affairs, Hoehler requested information from the UN. Folder also contains correspondence from the American Association for the UN.
 
White House Conference on Education, 1955 Box 25, Folder 267
Note Because of his demonstrated interest in public education, Hoehler received material pertaining to the upcoming conference.
 
Series 3. Articles, Speeches, and Related Materials, 1922-1965 (Boxes 25-34, Folders 268-335.)  
Note Series 3, Articles, Speeches, and Related Materials, contains articles and speeches written by Hoehler as well as pertinent correspondence and resource material collected and used by him.
Box 25
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, 1922-1933 Box 25, Folder 268 to 269
Note Bulk of folder contents deal with the Great Depression. Material deals with the mental effects resulting from unemployment, provisions for transient men, the outlook for and policy re relief (the need for public funds is discussed), child welfare during the depression, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, etc. Other papers re municipal public welfare programs, the Cincinnati schools, and the commendable work of the Cincinnati Red Cross and the Junior League are also contained in these folders. Background material re policy and juvenile courts is also included.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, 1934 Box 25, Folder 270
Note Bulk of the material deals with the Great Depression. Papers discuss the need for job security, the responsibility of the federal government for providing employment, the crime prevention work of municipal public welfare in Cincinnati, traffic problems in Cincinnati, changing goals of the YMCA, and the requirements of a good police depart­ment. Among the resource material is an article by Homer Folks entitle "Making Relief Work."
Box 26
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, 1934 Box 26, Folder 271
Note (continued from previous folder.)
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, 1935 Box 26, Folder 272
Note Civic responsibility, the Federal Security Act, fire prevention, the YMCA, delinquency and crime, the Great Depression (especially funding of relief), and the concept of safe communities are topics covered in these papers. Folder also includes a Hamilton County public welfare report, articles by Alfred E. Smith on probation and by Thomas D. Eliot on the functions of the juvenile court, and a bulletin, Public Management.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, 1936-1939 Box 26, Folder 273 to 274
Note Material re the Great Depression, relief, and social security includes discussion of the effect of social security upon welfare administration, state citizens committees studying public welfare, and the sound administration of relief. Medical care problems and social work education history, trends, and needs are also dealt with in these papers. A detailed correspondence course in local welfare administration is included as well.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, 1940-1942 Box 26, Folder 275 to 276
Note Much of the material is related to World War II; articles re welfare services during wartime, social services for the armed forces, and problems of local government in camp areas are included. Articles re hospital administration, economic security, and the history and trends of social work; reports re the "Children in a Democracy" conference and a conference on relief and resident laws; Hoehler’s National Conference of Social Work presidential statement; and a Cincinnati employment census are also included.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, 1943-July, 1945 Box 26, Folder 277
Note Bulk of folder is about the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration—its foundation, purposes, funding, and activities. The role of voluntary agencies in UNRRA’s work is also dis­cussed. Other subjects related to World War II are covered as well, viz. the treatment of defeated Japan, developments in the city of Coventry, and British-American relations. Correspondence re Hoehler’s writing of a booklet on displaced persons for the Foreign Policy Association is included.
Box 27
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, August-December, 1945 Box 27, Folder 278 to 279
Note Extensive detailed material on the origin and activities of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation. Included with this material is information re displaced persons, displaced persons camps, problems of relief and rehabilitation delivery in Europe (comments by Margaret Mead are included), and UNRRA1s work in Africa. Correspondence surrounding Hoehler’s writing and publications of Europe’s Homeless Millions for the Foreign Policy Association is also included.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-April, 1946 Box 27, Folder 280
Note Additional material about the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation and postwar conditions in Europe includes a discussion of the role of social service agencies in recovery plans. Folder also contains mention of developments in Iran, a critical response to Hoehler’s Europe’s Homeless Millions from a Lithuanian official, and speeches re the international aspects of social work and recent trends in social work. Resource material includes a report on atomic energy.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, May-August, 1946 Box 27, Folder 281 to 282
Note Information re postwar conditions in both Europe and the United States is accompanied by material on the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Admin­istration. Correspondence and papers surrounding a controversial radio debate on the future of UNRRA are also included. Resource material contains an issue of the Foreign Policy Bulletin. A letter from Harriet Vittum, head resident of the Northwestern University Settlement, is also included.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, September-December, 1946 Box 27, Folder 283 to 285
Note Bulk of material deals with displaced persons and the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration. The history, purposes, and accomplishments of UNRRA as well as the problems and current situations of displaced persons in Europe, Africa, and Asia are discussed. Postwar conditions in Europe and postwar tensions in the United States (e.g., racial prejudice) are also described. Papers contain material on the problems of international social work and the Chicago Community Fund as a planning agency. Resource material includes an article by John J. Corson entitled "The Outlook for Peace."
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-March, 1947  Box 27, Folder 286
Note The UN’s accomplishments and the prospects for peace, the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and displaced persons, social planning and community chests and councils of social agencies, and the scope and protection of human rights are discussed. Resource material includes comments by John Nuveen on the unionization of a Chicago YMCA.
Box 28
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, April-May, 1947 Box 28, Folder 287
Note Material re the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, displaced persons, social planning, and public relations of social welfare agencies. Resource material includes a platform for public welfare services in Virginia and an article on community chests.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, June-November, 1947 Box 28, Folder 288
Note Considerable information re the history of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and its current work with displaced persons. Folder contents also contain a discussion of conditions in postwar Europe, a detailed explication of the Chicago Community Fund budget, and a Chicago Community Fund review of public family and children’s welfare agencies. Resource material includes material on community trusts and public and private responsibility in social planning.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, December, 1947 Box 28, Folder 289
Note Resource articles re soil conservation and John Peter Altgeld (the latter by Justice William 0. Douglas) accompanies material re the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and displaced persons.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-February, 1948 Box 28, Folder 290
Note Papers reflect Hoehler’s thoughts on the relation between public and private agencies in social work and planning and the responsibilities of board members of private agencies. Resource material includes information on American Red Cross overseas relief work; a report on the cost of serving persons "unhoused" because of eviction, fire, and lockouts; and articles re the redevelopment of Chicago (by Harriet Vittum), the future developments in social work (by Hertha Kraus), community chest campaigns, state-wide community chests, and relations between professionals and laymen and between local and federal government in social welfare.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, March-August, 1948 Box 28, Folder 291 to 292
Note Community organization work (especially in regard to community welfare councils), the current plight of displaced persons, and international social work are discussed. Resource material includes material on the influence of budgeting on the development of social welfare programs, working with a board of directors, the "open door" policy in community chests, Jewish social welfare work, and the US Department of Labor. An Adlai Stevenson speech on immigration is also included.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, September-December, 1948 Box 28, Folder 293
Note Material re Helen Cody Baker, displaced persons, the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, the International Refugee Organization, international social work (description of groups and types of operations involved), citizen participation in social work, and the broad problems of social work. Resource material includes articles on the future of voluntary social welfare organizations and their role in American culture.
Box 29
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-July, 1949 Box 29, Folder 294
Note  The UN’s accomplishments and current situation, the relation between churches and public welfare, local mental health programs, and trends in international social welfare are discussed. Folder consists primarily of correspondence re speaking engagements.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, August-September, 1949 Box 29, Folder 295
Note Limited material on mental illness is accompanied by extensive correspondence re speaking engagements.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, October, 1949 Box 29, Folder 296
Note Several discussions re the operation and problems of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare. Resource material includes the presidential address of the Massachusetts Conference of Social Work.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, November-December, 1949 Box 29, Folder 297
Note Detailed information re displaced persons and the history, organization, and operation of community chests. Folder also contains discussions about the need for cooperation between public and private social welfare agencies and the development through grants-in-aid of programs for the care of children and the aged. Resource material includes a discussion of the social security program and the relation between social welfare programs and the national economy.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-May, 1950 Box 29, Folder 298 to 299
Note Displaced persons, child welfare, mental health programs, the history and developments of health and welfare programs (1900-1950), the history and problems of the YMCA, and youth’s relation to the interest in government are among the issues discussed.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, June-December, 1950 Box 29, Folder 300 to 301
Note Illinois state programs for the mentally ill, causes of mental illness, the history of public welfare in the US, displaced persons, the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, and the International Refugee Organization are discussed. Resource material includes an article by Benjamin E. Youndahl on the functions and financing of state welfare organizations. An itinerary of Hoehler’s speaking engagements and an issue of State Government in which an article by Hoehler on the history of public health and welfare appears are also included.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-June, 1951 Box 29, Folder 302
Note Folders contain material on the Illinois Department of Public Welfare, the various implications of an aging population, social welfare planning, and the outlook in public welfare. Resource material includes articles re refugees and displaced persons, democracy, and public presentations of agency information. Surrounding correspondence includes notes from Edith Abbott re Hoehler’s review of a three-volume history of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Adminis trat ion.
Box 30
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-June, 1951 Box 30, Folder 303
Note (continued from previous folder.)
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, July-December, 1951 Box 30, Folder 304 to 305
Note A speech entitled "Some Aspects of Public Welfare Today and Tomorrow" accompanies material on displaced persons, social security, and Illinois services for the blind, psychotic children, and the mentally ill. Resource material includes a pamphlet on Palestinian refugees and information re the International Refugee Organization.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-May, 1952 Box 30, Folder 306 to 307
Note Articles entitled "Some Aspects of Public Welfare: Today and Tomorrow" and "Important Elements in a Modern Welfare Program" accompany material on mental health, the Illinois Department of Public Welfare, and the need for citizens’ school committees. Resource material deals with mental health and the modernizing of Chicago’s "municipal machinery."
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, June-September, 1952 Box 30, Folder 308
Note Folder contains papers re the Illinois Department of Public Welfare and the sex offender and a speech entitled "Conserving Human Resources" (child welfare and aging are discussed). Resource material includes the transcript of an interview with Ohio Senator Taft, Adlai Stevenson’s midyear governor’s report, Stevenson’s acceptance speech of the Democratic presidential nomination, and information re the McCarran Immigration Bill.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, October-December, 1952 Box 30, Folder 309 to 310
Note Papers about displaced persons and refugees and state mental health programs, material re mental health programs discuss the value of using volunteers, the services provided for children and the aged, and general problems of mental health programs. Articles entitled "Has the Prison a Welfare Function?" and "Conserving Human Resources" are also contained in the folders. Resource material includes a paper re sociological approaches in correctional programs and an International Conference of Social Work newsletter.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-March, 1953 Box 30, Folder 311
Note A speech entitled "Citizen Support of Schools and Good Government" accompanies speeches on the conservation of human resources (child welfare is discussed) and the goals of and challenges facing Citizens of Greater Chicago. Correspondence from Joel Hunter is included.
Box 31
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-March, 1953 Box 31, Folder 312
Note (continued from previous folder.)
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, April-May, 1953 Box 31, Folder 313
Note Folder contains speeches entitled "Good Laws—How to Administer Them," "Who Wants Better Government?", "Churchmen’s Stake in Greater Chicago," and "Suburbanites7 Stake in Modernizing Chicago’s Government." These and accompanying material discuss the League of Women Voters, requirements for improved mental health programs, citizen participation in government, city charter reform, and the goals of and challenges facing Citizens of Greater Chicago. Resource material includes a brochure on refugees and displaced persons.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, June-October, 1953 Box 31, Folder 314 to 315
Note Folders contain speeches entitled "Blueprint for Civic Maturity" and "The Community’s Stake in Mental Health" and a testimony to Gertrude Springer upon her death. Included as well are comments re the defeat of the Chicago charter reform bill and the accomplishments, goals, and problems of Citizens of Greater Chicago,
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, November-December, 1953 Box 31, Folder 316
Note Speeches entitled "The Public Looks at Mental Health" and "Mobilizing for a Greater Chicago’; comments re the Chicago city council, suburbanite responsibility for Chicago government, and the goals of Citizens of Greater Chicago; and resource material that includes a booklet on training and research in state mental health programs and a pamphlet on the national costs of mental illness.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-April, 1954 Box 31, Folder 317
Note Folder contains speeches entitled "The Public Looks at Mental Hospitals," "The Price of Freedom," and "Is Decentralization Hurting Chicago?" The goals of Citizens of Greater Chicago, the political responsibility for slum prevention, the pending investigation of Chicago politicians and organized crime, and the nature of reform are discussed. Resource material includes a paper on freedom and Joseph McCarthy.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, May-December, 1954 Box 31, Folder 318
Note A speech, "The Role of the Federal Advisory Council on Employment Security," is found with other writings on government corruption and citizen responsibility, the city charter reform, and international refugees. The history of public mental health care in Illinois since 1940 is also discussed.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, 1955 Box 31, Folder 319
Note Refugees and displaced persons, the problems and needs of state mental health programs, delinquency in Cook County, city charter reform, the Mayor’s Committee on the UN, social security, history of the American Public Welfare Association, human rights, and problems of city government are covered in these papers.
Box 32
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-October, 1956 Box 32, Folder 320
Note A tribute to Bishop Bernard Shell, a discussion of metropolitan and suburban cooperation in delivery of basic public services, and articles entitled "The Churchman’s Role in Politics," "Community Conservation," "Sane Legislation for Mental Health," and "Whence the Immigrant?" Resource material includes an article on democracy, state governments, and liberal education.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, November-December, 1956 Box 32, Folder 321 to 321
Note Speech notes on aging as well as freedom and democracy, excerpts from Daley’s budget message, and articles on displaced persons. An article entitled "Chicago— Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow" discusses the problems of and proposed civic improvements for Chicago.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-June, 1957 Box 32, Folder 322
Note Folder includes speeches entitled "The Social Agency’s Responsibility in the Field of Alcoholism" and "Demo­cracy for Young and Old." International events and problems of and programs for senior citizens are covered in the material as well.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, July-December, 1957 Box 32, Folder 323
Note An article on refugees and displaced persons and speech notes on schools and the public welfare. Resource material includes an extensive and detailed discussion of social security, a United Nations Relief and Works Agency report, issues of AAUN News and the United States Municipal News, a piece by Edith Sampson on international relations, and material on fund solici­tation.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, 1958 Box 32, Folder 324 to 325
Note Articles, notes, and resource material re refugees and displaced persons are accompanied in these folders by Hoehler’s short speeches of welcome given to various meetings on behalf of Mayor Daley. The latter as well as other material deals briefly with aging, mental health, brotherhood, the National Federation of Settlements and Neighborhood Centers, the National Conference on Social Welfare, the US Department of Labor, and disaster control programs. A progress report of the Daley administration and a detailed account of a meeting on the major economic groups and national policy are also included.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-October, 1959 Box 32, Folder 326
Note Folder contains considerable resource material on Middle East refugees and displaced persons as well as Hoehler’s article on the same. An address entitled "Public Welfare’s Responsibility in a Period of Unemployment" (delivered at the AFL-CIO National Conference on Community Services) is also included. Correspondence about and lectures for the Murray Seasongood lecture series on government are also in this folder.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, November-December, 1959 Box 32, Folder 327
Note Bulk of folder consists of resource material about refugees (particularly in the Middle East), the UN, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency, and the UN World Refugee Year.
Box 33
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, January-September, 1960 Box 33, Folder 328 to 329
Note An article on disaster relief is accompanied by con­siderable resource material on the World Refugee Year and the challenges facing the United Nations Relief and Works Agency. A variety of materials (minutes, reports, etc.) from the US Committee for Refugees and CARE, the annual report of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and correspondence re the Murray Seasongood lecture series on government are also included.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, October-December, 1960 Box 33, Folder 330 to 331
Note Bulk of the folders consist of Hoehler’s articles and collected resource material on refugees and dis­placed persons, disaster relief, and the World Refugee Year. The Murray Seasongood lecture series on government is mentioned.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, 1961-1963 Box 33, Folder 332
Note Articles re the current situations of displaced persons and refugees are accompanied by related correspondence.
 
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, undated Box 33, Folder 333 to 334
Note Notes and drafts deal with American public welfare, youth, the YMCA, volunteers, relief, and citizen responsibility for municipal welfare. Speeches include "The Human Side of Government," "Conserving Human Resources," "Medical Needs from the Standpoint of a Public Welfare Council," and "Business Girl?? and Recent Economic Changes." Resource material re human relations, mental health in Illinois, casework and the court, and mental hazards of unemployment is also contained in these folders.
Box 34
Articles, Speeches, and Related Material, undated Box 34, Folder 335
Note (continued from previous folder)
 
Adult Education Association of the United States of America, 1954-1958 Box 34, Folder 336 to 337
Note Folders contain an invitation to Hoehler to join the Adult Education Association’s 1954 national program committee, a membership list of the committee, agendas for the planning meetings, and suggestions for the approaching national convention. Also included are a lengthy memorandum entitled "Direction Finding Processes in the AEA: An Historical Review," suggestions and a final report re a 1957 conference on a "direction-finding project" for the association, a Columbia University research proposal for studying the role of national adult education organizations, and a proposal for the publication of a handbook on adult education.
 
Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago, 1954-August, 1956 Box 34, Folder 338
Note Lists of nominees for and members of the board of directors, board of directors minutes, an executive director’s report, amendments to the council con­stitution and bylaws, and committee assignment lists. Revealing concern for revitalizing the council, the papers include material re proposed future programs and projects, financial goals and plans, and past activities. Membership in the Illinois Adult Education Association is also discussed.
 
Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago, September, 1956-1958 Box 34, Folder 339
Note Board of directors minutes and membership lists, committee assignment lists, executive director’s reports, an audit, and a proposal for a "University of the City" accompany a manual that contains information re the history of adult education in the US and the Chicago council’s history, purpose, past and future activities, budget, and member agencies. A constitution and bylaws are also included in the manual.
 
Advisory Committee on Public Employment and Relief, 1934-1935 Box 34, Folder 340
Note Created by the Committee on Economic Security to assist in dealing with relief and rehabilitation, the committee considered such matters as the establishment of a permanent public welfare department or bureau in the federal government, the development and oper­ation of public employment programs, and the effects of the social security bill on municipalities.
 
AFL Local 25 Board of Arbitration, 1954, 1961 Box 34, Folder 341
Note Folder includes correspondence and reports generated by the board’s arbitration of a wage dispute between the janitors union and the Building Managers Asso­ciation.
 
American Association for the United Nations, Illinois and Greater Chicago Division, 1958-1965 Box 34, Folder 342 to 343
Note Bylaws, board of directors minutes, board membership lists, newsletters, financial reports, and correspon­dence from the national office outline the projects and programs of the two groups. Folders include a speech by Philip M. Kleltznick, a past delegate to the UN Economic and Social Council, and by Adlai Stevenson (the latter was given at the UN’s 20th anniversary celebration). Material re a proposed midwest area association office is included.
Box 35
American Association of Social Workers, Cincinnati Chapter, 1935 Box 35, Folder 344
Note Committee report outlines criticisms of President Roosevelt’s announced plans for public work and relief. Material re a conference on poor law revisions and a panel discussion on interpretation of social work is also included.
 
American Foundation for Creative Research, 1958-1961  Box 35, Folder 345
Note Limited materials include a research proposal re the selection and training of psychiatric residents. The foundation was formerly known as the Illinois Social Welfare Foundation.
 
American Overseas Aid and United Nations Appeal for Children Allocations Committee, 1947-1948 Box 35, Folder 346
Note Limited correspondence re the importance and organ­ization of this fund raising effort.
 
Series 4. Employment and Affiliations, 1931-1964. (Boxes 34-83, Folders 336-786)  
Note Series 4, Employment and Affiliations, is arranged alphabetically by organization and contains correspondence and organizational records stemming from Hoehler's employment and affiliations with professional, government, and civic associations.
 
American Public Welfare Association  
Box 35
Correspondence and Papers, 1945-1948 Box 35, Folder 347
Note Folder contains board minutes and related material, minutes of a planning committee discussing the or­ganization of an integrated county welfare department, and material re the Public Welfare Act of 1946. Cor­respondence between Louis Hosch and Sanford Bates re an APWA editorial decision discusses the guaranteeing of security and welfare in relation to the development of communism. Programs from the APWA annual round table conferences, a 1946 director’s report, a tran­script of APWA testimony on the National Health Act of 1947, and an essay on the role of the APWA in the social security legislation of the 1930’s are also included. George McKibbon and Howard L. Russell are subjects and correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1949-1950 Box 35, Folder 348
Note Correspondence deals with both the selection of a director for APWA and the Association’s financial problems. In the discussion of these problems, Hoehler, Elizabeth Wickenden, and Loula Dunn con­sider future plans for the Association. Folder also contains an editorial by Hoehler, minutes of the board of directors and executive committee, a program and summary of an APWA annual round table conference, and reports to foundations. Ellen Winston, Herbert Emmerich, Robert Lansdale, Charles Merriam, and Harry Page are mentioned.
 
Correspondence and Papers, January-September, 1951 Box 35, Folder 349
Note Extensive material re the relationship between the Washington and Chicago APWA offices is culminated by a final report recommending retaining both offices and the reduction of some APWA activities. Corres­pondence from Henry McCarthy, New York City welfare commissioner, and Raymond Hilliard details their objections to the inclusion of Bertha C. Reynolds on an APWA program because they believed her to be closely associated with the Communist movement. Folder also includes a response to the Saturday Evening Post’s article entitled "The Relief Chiselers are Stealing Us Blind," an article by Hoehler entitled "Social Welfare Planning," and discussions of APWA1s financial situation. Arthur Altmeyer, Joseph Baldwin, Louis Brownlow, Loula Dunn, Robert Lansdale, Harry Page, Patrick Tompkins, Charlotte Whitton, Ellen Winston, and the National Social Welfare Assembly are subjects or correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, October-December, 1951 Box 35, Folder 350
Note Folder contains board of directors minutes, a dir­ector’s report, and discussions of proposed bylaw revisions, confidentiality of public assistance records, the Jenner amendment, the National Social Welfare Assembly, the American Association of Social Workers, and undergraduate training for public assistance work. Loula Dunn, Donald S. Howard, Elizabeth Wickenden, and Robert Wray are subjects or correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1952 Box 35, Folder 351
Note Board of directors and executive committee minutes, an audit, an Inter-Association Committee on Health statement on fluoridation, correspondence with foundation re funding, and material re the Council of Social Work Education, the public assistance worker, and a regional APWA conference. The relationship between the National Social Welfare Assembly and APWA is also discussed. Loula Dunn, Frank Bane, Sanford Bates, Patrick Tompkins, and John Tramburg are subjects or correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, January-July, 1953 Box 35, Folder 352
Note Annual report and audit, board of directors minutes, financial statements, membership statistics, and several reports from the Washington APWA office. Confidentiality of public assistance records, social security, federal and state relations in public welfare, the US Children’s Bureau, old age assistance, and the APWA biennial round table conference are discussed. Arthur Altmeyer, Michael Davis, Marshall Field, Gertrude Springer, Elizabeth Wickenden, and John Winters are subjects or correspondents.
Box 36
Correspondence and Papers, August-December, 1953 Box 36, Folder 353
Note Folder includes an annual report, financial statements (sources of APWA income indicated), membership lists of board of directors and committees, Association membership statistics, report of committee on aging, program of biennial round table conference, and material from a regional conference planning committee. Old age and survivors insurance, grants-in-aid, social security, and federal-state relations in public welfare are covered in memoranda from the Washington APWA representative. A tribute to Gertrude Springer and correspondence with Harold Stassen are also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, January-April, 1954 Box 36, Folder 354
Note Board of directors minutes, quarterly membership and financial reports, and national membership committee minutes. Folder also contains memoranda re social security legislation, grants-in-aid, juvenile delinquency, the APWA Aid to Dependent Children study, and the US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.
 
Correspondence and Papers, May-July, 1954 Box 36, Folder 355
Note Board of directors minutes, the annual report for 1953, a financial statement, membership reports (including list of sustaining and supporting members), and APWA policy statements re citizen boards and advisory committees, child welfare in public agencies, responsibility for treatment of juvenile delinquency, and payment for hospital care. The proposed constitution and bylaws of the National Council of Public Welfare Board members, a report on state associations of local public welfare administrators, and APWA memoranda re the US Children’s Bureau appropriations and social security amendments are also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, August-December, 1954 Box 36, Folder 356
Note Executive committee minutes, financial statements, membership reports (sustaining and supporting members indicated), registration and financial statistics of regional conferences, planning material for regional conferences, and a grant proposal requesting funding of APWA work in the field of medical care for the poor.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1955 Box 36, Folder 357
Note Folder contains board of directors minutes, a member­ship list of board of directors and committees, a financial statement and planning material for the biennial round table conference. The preceding includes a letter from Frances Perkins re attending the biennial round table conference, a tribute to Frank Bane, a history of APWA (including a discussion of APWA’s impact on social security legislation), and correspondence re cooperation with the National Social Welfare Assembly.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1956-1957 Box 36, Folder 358
Note Folder consists primarily of material re the planning and preparation for the biennial national round table conference. Letters to Agens Meyers, Ella Reed, and Elwood Johnson and a ballot for election of APWA officers and board of directors are included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1958-1963 Box 36, Folder 359
Note Congressional testimony by John Tramburg and Ellen Winston (APWA presidents) re unemployment insurance, public assistance, and social security; a grant proposal requesting funds to study aid to dependent children; registration; correspondence re the presentation of the W. S. Terry Award to Hoehler; a ballot for election of APWA officers and board of directors; and a copy of APWA bylaws.
Box 37
Aging Project, 1952 Box 37, Folder 360
Note Correspondence re a proposal, "Toward a More Satisfying Old Age—The Role of the Public Welfare Department," submitted to and approved by the Doris Duke Foundation.
 
Aid to Dependent Children Study, 1951-1952 Box 37, Folder 361
Note Correspondence and papers describe the study ("Future Citizens All") which analyzed the ADC program; particular attention is given to the environment, accomplishments, and problems of the children in families receiving ADC assistance.
 
Civil Defense Committee, 1951-1952 Box 37, Folder 362
Note Folder contains extended comments by James Brindle on the Federal Civil Defense Administration’s "Technical Manual on Registration and Information" and "Emergency Welfare Services Administrative Guide." An APWA bulletin summarizes issues discussed by the Association’s civil defense committee and the FCDA.
 
Committee on Interna­tional Conference of Social Work, 1953-1954 Box 37, Folder 363
Note Correspondence and papers generated in preparation for the 1954 International Conference of Social Work in Toronto. Also contained in the folder is a detailed narrative re the establishment of the US Children’s Bureau; the history was written to illustrate citizen participation in a national social welfare program.
 
Committee on Medical Care, 1950-1953 Box 37, Folder 364
Note Correspondence and grant proposal requesting foundation support of APWA efforts to advance the under­standing and policy formulation of tax-supported medical care for the poor, A joint statement by the American Public Health Association and APWA re tax-supported general medical care for the poor, an annual report of the APWA medical care committee, and minutes from the medical advisory committee of the American Legion are also included. Gertrude Sturges is mentioned.
 
Committees, 1951-1952 Box 37, Folder 365
Note Correspondence re the appointment of committee chairmen, a finance committee report, and membership lists of the 1952 board of directors and APWA committees.
 
Finance Committee, 1949-1950 Box 37, Folder 366
Note Lists of Local Council of Public Welfare Administrators officers and APWA staff, officers, and board members. Folder also includes finance committee minutes, minutes of a meeting with foundation representatives, a chart of APWA income, and correspondence re the Associations financial situation.
 
Committee on Health, 1950-1952 Box 37, Folder 367
Note Minutes, correspondence, and committee statements re maternal and child health, state and local planning, the improvement and better distribution of nursing services, fluoridation of public water, medical care for the poor, payment for hospital care, health care of military dependents, and confidentiality of public assistance records. Folder also includes the administrative rules of the Inter-Association Committee on Health.
 
Committee on Health, 1953-1954 Box 37, Folder 368
Note Minutes, agendas, reports, and correspondence contain material re the need for local health councils. Organization plans for the US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare; the American Medical Association’s refusal to participate in any joint committee statements; and plans for a new committee meeting and working schedule are also discussed. A letter from Harry O. Page is included.
 
Joint Housing Committee, 1953-1954 Box 37, Folder 369
Note Minutes, agenda, and membership list of this committee which was sponsored by the National Association of Housing Officials and APWA. Correspondence and papers deal with urban renewal, housing for the elderly, the relation of housing to social welfare, broader sponsor­ship of the committee, and cooperation with the National Conference of Social Work.
 
National Biennial Round Table Conference, 1961 Box 37, Folder 370
Note Correspondence, speeches, and program re a conference session on public services for released mental patients and persons using psychiatric services in community health centers. Hoehler chaired the session entitled "Who Needs Tranquilizers?". Extensive material re tranquilizers is also included.
 
National Council on Social Work Education, 1951-1952 Box 37, Folder 371
Note Correspondence and memoranda re the establishment of a permanent Council on Social Work Education. The selection of public agency representatives for the council is of primary concern in these papers. Loula Dunn, Jane Hoey, Joseph P. Anderson, Fedele Fauri, and Robert Wray are correspondents or subjects.
 
National Social Welfare Assembly, 1948-1952 Box 37, Folder 372
Note Extensive correspondence surrounding the APWA’s 1951 disaffiliation from NSWA. Papers detail the history of the two organizations’ disagreements, including their differences over civil defense. Robert Bondy, Robert Lansdale, and Loula Dunn are prominent cor­respondents. Hoehler was APWA president when the disaffiliation occured.
Box 38
Policy Committee, 1950-1952 Box 38, Folder 373
Note Charged with revising the APWA platform, this committee produced a statement of principles re public welfare. Correspondence and drafts are included in the folder.
 
Portland, Maine, Study, 1950-1952 Box 38, Folder 374
Note Correspondence re a brief study of welfare agencies in Portland made by Loula Dunn and Hoehler. Folder also contains papers generated in response to their visit, including material re a later, more thorough, study done by Robert Lansdale.
 
Public Welfare, 1952 Box 38, Folder 375
Note January and April issues containing pieces by Hoehler.
 
Raymond Rich Associates, Report, 1950 Box 38, Folder 376
Note Correspondence arranging a study to be conducted by the Raymond Rich Associates of financial resources available to APWA. The final report is included in the folder.
 
Regional Conference Committee, 1950-1952 Box 38, Folder 377
Note Primarily correspondence generated by invitations for Hoehler to speak at the several regional conferences . Programs and conference schedules are included.
 
American Society for Public Administration  
Box 38
Correspondence and Papers, 1950-1953 Box 38, Folder 378
Note Folder contains a copy of the Society’s constitution, minutes of an ASPA council meeting and an annual business meeting, budget sheets, lists of chapter officers, and a compilation of results from an international questionnaire re methods for improvement of organization and management.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1955-1957 Box 38, Folder 379 to 380
Note Folders include an ASPA proposal requesting foundation funding, material re the annual national conference at which Hoehler chaired a panel, a list of chapter officers, and comments re the need for ASPA to take clearly defined positions on issues. Copies of the Public Administration Bulletin and the Public Administration News are also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1958-1959 Box 38, Folder 381
Note An ASPA president’s report; financial reports; a report re problems, prospects, and recommendations for ASPA’s future; material re attracting young people to public service and making ASPA more useful to administrators; a letter nominating Hoehler to the ASPA council; and suggestions for national conference panels.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1960-1961 Box 38, Folder 382
Note Copy of the amended constitution; agenda and minutes of a council meeting; a proposal requesting foundation funding of research and training in comparative public administration; detailed reports re ASPA’s organization, program, and finances; lists of agency affiliates and chapter financial contributions; and suggestions for national conference panels and workshops. Mention of the International Institute of Administrative Sciences and a letter announcing Robert J. M. Matteson’s resignation as executive director are also included in the folder.
Box 39
Correspondence and Papers, 1962-1964 Box 39, Folder 383
Note Folder contains council meeting minutes, reports (in­cluding one on staff compensation and benefits), a proposal for a technical digest in public administra­tion, a list of staff responsibilities, material re ASPA’s financial situation, and correspondence re chapter awards, particularly the Fred K. Hoehler Chapter Award,
 
Chicago Chapter,, 1956-1967 Box 39, Folder 384 to 385
Note Material re the re-establishment of the Chicago chapter. Copies of the chapter constitution, membership lists, and correspondence re recruiting new members, proposed chapter activities, and election of officers are included.
 
National Conference, 1960-1961 Box 39, Folder 386
Note Correspondence arranging a conference panel on social security.
 
National Membership Committee, 1957-1959 Box 39, Folder 387 to 390
Note Correspondence re recruitment of new members is accompanied by monthly membership reports and committee lists and reports.
 
Western Administration Conference, 1957 Box 39, Folder 391
Note Correspondence arranging a panel on freedom of information. A preliminary program, the text of the major presentation, and material from Republican Moss’s House Government Information Subcommittee are also included.
 
CARE  
Box 39
Correspondence and Papers, 1955-1956 Box 39, Folder 392
Note Agendas, memoranda, and correspondence describe CARE’s expansion plan, the 10th anniversary observances, and the 1956 food crusade.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1957 Box 39, Folder 393
Note Folder includes material re the Poland campaign, a financial campaign, Hoehler’s visit to a Panamanian village on behalf of CARE, and a monthly report from the midwest CARE office. Correspondence involving Hoehler, Richard Reuter, and Abraham Becker re Martha David’s resignation from the directorship of the midwest CARE office is also included.
Box 40
Correspondence and Papers, 1958-1959 Box 40, Folder 394
Note Monthly reports, memoranda, speeches, etc. deal with CARE’s food crusade, its Middle East program, the Business Council for International Understanding, fund raising among federal employees, Martha David’s resignation from the midwest CARE office, and the national office’s public relations. Dorothy Aldis, author of children’s books, is mentioned; Richard Reuter is a correspondent.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1960-1965 Box 40, Folder 395
Note Folder contains material re CARE Week in Chicago, a field staff conference, and Dorothy Aldis’ children’s books. Committee membership lists and clippings are also included,
 
Poland Campaign, 1957-1958 Box 40, Folder 396
Note Information re CARE’s agreement with Poland, conditions in Poland, CARE’s first shipment to Poland, and Chicago’s activities in support of the campaign.
 
Chicago, Special Consultant to Mayor Daley  
Box 40
Daley Correspondence , 1953-1954 Box 40, Folder 397
Note Material re the election of judges and Daley’s election to the chairmanship of the Cook County Democratic party.
 
Daley Correspondence, 1955 Box 40, Folder 398
Note Folder contains discussions re the appointment of special civic committees, judicial reform, the House of Correction, the housing commission, the Chicago Urban League, the mayor’s United Nations committee, and a study of civil service in Chicago.
 
Daley Correspondence, 1956 Box 40, Folder 399 to 400
Note Material deals with the activities of several of the mayor’s citizens and advisory committees, but particularly with those of committees on juvenile delinquency, community welfare, newcomers in Chicago (Appalachian Southerners, Negroes, Puerto Ricans, and Indians), senior citizens, and the United Nations. The civil service study, the House of Correction, absenteeism among city employees, the US Senate Disarmament Subcommittee, the merit promotion of police, and the city health department and ambulance program are also discussed.
 
Daley Correspondence, 1957 Box 40, Folder 401 to 402
Note Memoranda and letters reflect Hoehler’s activities as liaison between Daley’s administration and a variety of citizens groups. Race relations, health care, the city’s ambulance program, the city clean­up program, the Mayor’s Commission on Senior Citizens, the Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, the Chicago Civil Service Commission, NAACP complaints and concerns, the United Nations committee, police activities, the Women’s Advertising Club of Chicago, and the merger of Chicago and Cook County welfare services are discussed.
Box 41
Daley Correspondence, 1958 Box 41, Folder 403 to 404
Note Reports on Hoehler’s activities as consultant on health and welfare matters and his liaison work with both individuals and groups. The need for additional facilities for the mentally retarded, the development of a new geriatric and mental health services, civil service, housing programs for the elderly, professional education programs for city employees, unemployment in Illinois, the senior citizen commission, dissatisfaction with the Chicago Commission on Human Relations, race relations (Indians, Mexican Americans, Negroes, and Puerto Ricans are mentioned), the Women’s Adver­tising Club of Chicago’s interest in mental health, an international center for Chicago, a proposal for a disaster control program, horticultural programs for senior citizens, and the United Nations are discussed.
 
Daley Correspondence, 1959 Box 41, Folder 405
Note Material reflects Hoehler’s activities as consultant on health and welfare matters and his liaison work with both individuals and groups. The migration of souther­ners to Chicago, race relations (Spanish-speaking peoples are mentioned), the Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, public and private support for health services, the development of a home care program at Cook County Hospital, plans for a conference on retirement, the provision of services to international seamen, improved recruitment of police personnel, a proposed reception for foreign students, the Meals on Wheels program, and inquiries re the senior citizen commission, housing, and employment are discussed in the correspondence. Folder also includes an article re activities and accomplishments of the Daley admin­istration.
 
Daley Correspondence, 1960 Box 41, Folder 406
Note Material reflects Hoehler’s activities as consultant on health and welfare matters and his liaison work with both individuals and groups. Overcrowding and other problems at the House of Correction, a pro­posed commission for new citizens, financial problems of the aged, needs of the policy board, and the city cleanup program are also discussed.
 
Daley Correspondence, 1961 Box 41, Folder 407
Note Material reflects Hoehler’s activities as consultant on health and welfare matters and his liaison work with both individuals and groups. Folder includes information re the Mayor’s Committee on New Residents (particularly on Cuban immigrants), an exposition for senior citizens, a report by the Chicago Bar Associa­tion on problems attending the use of credit, and a governor’s conference on mental health.
 
Daley Correspondence, 1962-1964 Box 41, Folder 408
Note Material reflects Hoehler’s activities as consultant on health and welfare matters and his liaison work with both individuals and groups. Correspondence also contains Hoehler’s announcement of his retirement and his offer to help Daley occasionally on a volunteer basis. Problems of the aged, a Chicago exposition for the aged, employment of the handi­capped, the annual Chicago United Nations program, the Mayor’s Commission on Senior Citizens, the Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, and Hoehler’s resignation from the police board are discussed. Daley’s 1963 inaugural address is also included.
 
Daley Meetings,, 1957-19xx Box 41, Folder 409 to 410
Note Correspondence inviting Daley to meetings, arranging for Hoehler’s attendance as Daley’s representative, and reporting the highlights of meetings attended by Hoehler.
Box 42
Daley Meetings,, 19xx-1961 Box 42, Folder 411 to 412
Note (continued from previous folder)
 
Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1953-1956 Box 42, Folder 413 to 414
Note Folders include material re housing legislation, a study of Negroes in medicine, international trade fairs, the Chicago public transit system’s financial problems, Chicago park facilities, city government censorship of literature, the possibility of a commission on immigration and citizenship, and a human relations course for Americanization teachers. Also contained is material re the creation of a city planning department, Chicago fire department statistical reports, social services of the Chicago municipal court, Daley’s 5-year plan to improve the city, and the Chicago Human Relations Commission’s interest in hospitals. Daley’s 1956 budget speech and newspaper clippings are included as well.
 
Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1957 Box 42, Folder 415
Note Citizens’ planning committees, a law suit against the Chicago Art Institute, state and federal aid to schools, a "no jury" art show, bond issues, redistricting of political wards, the social services of the municipal courts, the need for expanded Americanization classes for newcomers to Chicago, and labor-management relations in the Chicago Housing Authority are discussed. A speech entitled "I Believe In Chicago’s West Side" is included.
 
Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1958 Box 42, Folder 416
Note Folder contains correspondence and papers re an open occupancy ordinance, housing legislation recommended by the Chicago Federation of Settlements and Neighborhood Centers, coordination of physical and social planning, discrimination in employment on grounds of race and religion, the city’s alcoholic treatment center, problems of the aged, and a request for free bus fare for Visiting Nurses Association nurses.
 
Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1959-1963 Box 42, Folder 417 to 418
Note Employment of the handicapped, Boy Scout work with the physically handicapped and mentally retarded, city services for Spanish-speaking people, and problems of the aged are discussed. A Sunday newspaper supplement on Chicago is also included.
 
Advisory Committee of Chicago’s Our Lady of the Angels Fund, 1958-1964 Box 42, Folder 419
Note Material re the establishment and administration of a fund to aid victims of the 1958 fire which destroyed Our Lady of the Angels School
 
Advisory Committee to Plan for Homeless Men and Their Housing, 1956-1958 Box 42, Folder 420
Note Folder includes the research plans for a study of Chicago’s homeless men and reports entitled "Population and Housing in Chicago’s “Homeless Men1 Areas," "Who Lives on Skid Row and Why?", and "Some Characteristics of Residents on Chicago’s Skid Rows." A proposed questionnaire and a committee membership list is also included.
Box 43
Ambulance Program, 1956-1957 Box 43, Folder 421
Note Material re the division of responsibility among several city departments for the provision of emergency services. A 1954 report to Mayor Kennelly re ambulance services is also included.
 
Books Abroad Campaign, 1959, 1961 Box 43, Folder 422
Note Limited material re Chicago’s efforts to collect books for distribution overseas, a project intended to combat Communism.
 
Chicago and Cook County Welfare Departments, 1956-1962 Box 43, Folder 423 to 426
Note Folders include material describing the organization and history of the Chicago welfare department, a cost analysis of the Chicago welfare department’s con­valescent services, a memorandum re the Chicago board of health’s mental hygiene section, material re the consolidation of the Chicago and Cook County welfare departments, a statistical report on public assistance programs and expenditures, a discussion of the increased number of applications for general assistance funds, and correspondence re the use of city-owned buildings for health and welfare programs. Raymond M. Hilliard and Alvin E. Rose, Chicago welfare commissioner, are involved in a discussion of welfare reform.
 
Chicago Board of Education, 1955-1960 Box 43, Folder 427
Note Primarily material re the Americanization program of the public schools. Helen Lynch and Benjamin C. Willis, Chicago superintendent, are correspondents.
 
Chicago Board of Health, 1948, 1951-1959 Box 43, Folder 428 to 429
Note Correspondence and papers deal with reorganization of the board, the findings and recommendations of a Chicago-Cook County health survey, fluoridation of water supplies, the incidence and treatment of polio and tuberculosis in Chicago, the need for and intro­duction of mental health and geriatric services, membership of the board’s advisory committee, the importance of neighborhood clinics, the heart disease control section of the board, and budgets. Correspondence with the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago includes the council’s recommendation to the board of health re such matters as dental services, health services for preschool children, and public health education.
 
Chicago Civic Committee for the Jane Addams Centennial, 1959-19xx Box 43, Folder 430
Note Correspondence and papers deal with the selection of committee members and officials and the development of commemoration plans. Committee minutes, a publicity kit, a speech by Edith Sampson, a committee membership list, material from the Chicago Federation of Settlements and Neighborhood Centers, and newspaper clippings are contained in the folders. Correspondence with Archibald MacLeish, who delivered the major speech at the commemoration banquet, is also included.
Box 44
Chicago Civic Committee for the Jane Addams Centennial, 19xx-1961 Box 44, Folder 431
Note (continued from previous folder)
 
Chicago Civic Committee for World Refugees, 1959-1961 Box 44, Folder 432
Note Correspondence and papers discuss the committee’s objectives and plans. A membership list, newspaper clippings, and mention of Fridtof Nansen are also included. The US Committee for Refugees is involved in the correspondence.
 
Chicago Commission on Human Relations, 1956-1960, 1964 Box 44, Folder 433
Note Limited material mentions race relations, awards for human relations work, a tutoring program, and selection of an executive director.
 
Chicago Fire Department, 1957-1961 Box 44, Folder 434
Note Limited material discusses the need for in-service training. The department’s ambulance service is also mentioned.
 
Chicago Hungarian Relief Fund Advisory Committee, 1956-1957 Box 44, Folder 435
Note Primarily correspondence re the disbursement of funds gathered in Chicago. Folder contains information re organizations working with Hungarians refugees, viz. the (Illinois) Governor’s Committee for the Refugee Program, World University Service, First Aid for Hungary, and the Church World Service Refugee Committee.
 
Chicago Police Board, 1961-1962 Box 44, Folder 436
Note Board minutes, reports on resignation and discharges from the force, the proposed budget, and information re the reorganization of the police department.
 
Chicago Police Board, Superintendent 0. W. Wilson, 1960 Box 44, Folder 437
Note Material re police board meeting expenses, the selection of Wilson to head the police department, and policies governing the department.
 
Chicago Police Department, 1953-1961 Box 44, Folder 438
Note Folder contains correspondence re complaints about police burglary investigation, policies re salary and classification of policemen and members of the Crossing Guard Association (women who supervise school crossings), the departmental budget, the possibility of a police college, and the reorganization of the police force under Superintendent Wilson.
 
Chicago Urban League Citizens Advisory Committee, 1955-1956 Box 44, Folder 439
Note Correspondence and papers deal with the reorganization of the league. Folder contains a study of the Chicago league by the National Urban League office, statements of policy and practices, reports from the Chicago league’s president and new executive director, and a committee membership list.
 
Citizens’ Committee and City Officials’ Committee on Slum Fire, 1955 Box 44, Folder 440
Note Recommendations re prevention of fires in lodging houses.
 
Citizenship Council of Chicago, 1960-1961 Box 44, Folder 441
Note Discussion of the proposal transfer of the council’s program for immigrants from the Chicago board of education to the city government. A council membership list is included.
 
City Training Program, 1956-1958 Box 44, Folder 442
Note Limited correspondence deals with in-service and management training for municipal employees.
 
Civil Defense and Disaster, 1957-1958 Box 44, Folder 443
Note Folder includes proposals for a disaster control program and an outline of a survival plan for Chicago.
 
Civil Service Study, 1952-November, 1955 Box 44, Folder 444
Note One of Hoehler’s first jobs as special consultant to Mayor Daley was to review the several studies previously made of the Chicago civil service and to make recommendations for action to Daley. Folder contains an outline for a comprehensive personnel program for Chicago written by the Citizens’ Civil Service Association of Illinois, a detailed analysis of the history and operation of Chicago’s civil service, a study of salaries of Chicago’s elected officials and department heads, material re a proposed personnel administration code, and suggestions for improvements of police department service and morale. Also included is Hoehler’s report on the Chicago Civil Service Commission.
Box 45
Civil Service Study, December, 1955-June, 1956 Box 45, Folder 445 to 446
Note Correspondence and papers include material re litigation of civil service cases, examination program, sick leave, job classifications, reorganization of the Chicago Civil Service Commission, New York civil service laws, and suggested personnel policies for Chicago. The Chicago Bar Association is mentioned; Kenneth Lingle is a correspondent.
 
Civil Service Study, June 1956-February, 1957 Box 45, Folder 447
Note Folder contains material re litigation of civil service cases, modification of the civil service law, the administration of examinations, and a citizens advisory committee. Also included are a list of Chicago Civil Service Commission employees, a draft of the City Club of Chicago’s statement re principles of public personnel administration, and an issue of Good Government.
 
Civil Service Study, March, 1957-1960 Box 45, Folder 448 to 449
Note A detailed annual report of the Chicago Civil Service Commission is accompanied by correspondence and papers re the reorganization of the commission, a Citizens Public Personnel Association proposal for a study of personnel management, a proposed recruitment and train­ing program, retirement programs, examinations, and judicial review of Commission findings. The state civil service statute and a report re the merit system and personnel administration are also included in the folders.
 
Civil Service Study, Chicago Bar Association, 1956 Box 45, Folder 450
Note Correspondence and papers re the Chicago Bar Association’s study of litigation of civil services cases.
 
Civil Service Study, Examination Announcements, 1956-1962. Box 45, Folder 451
 
Civil Service Study, Newspaper Clippings, 1955-1960. Box 45, Folder 452
 
Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, 1958-1961 Box 45, Folder 453
Note Correspondence discusses the need for a civic committee to support the employment of handicapped persons.
 
Community Conservation Board, 1955-1956 Box 45, Folder 454
Note Folder includes material re the board’s program and budget, a proposed housing code, Sears Roebuck Company’s involvement in urban renewal, the importance of housing inspection, the needs of a good conservation program, and the establishment of a department of city planning in Chicago.
 
Community Fund of Chicago, 1959 Box 45, Folder 455
Note Correspondence and papers re long-range financial planning and cooperation between private welfare agencies and the Chicago municipal government.
Box 46
Foreign Visitors, 1954-1961 Box 46, Folder 456 to 457
Note Primarily correspondence arranging the reception and activities of dignitaries and officials visiting Chicago. A delegation of Russian social work officials was among those visiting Chicago.
 
Hospitals,, 1957-1958 Box 46, Folder 458
Note Correspondence and papers re a proposed central hospital planning body in Chicago, racial segregation in Chicago hospitals, and the establishment of additional hospitals.
 
House of Corrections, 1958-1960 Box 46, Folder 459
Note Brief discussions of health services for inmates.
 
International Center, 1955-1961 Box 46, Folder 460
Note Limited correspondence discusses the need for a building providing facilities and services for those involved in international trade and affairs in Chicago.
 
Mayor Daley’s Citizens Committee for a Cleaner Chicago, 1954-1955 Box 46, Folder 461 to 462
Note Material includes meeting agendas, a progress report, a special report from the committee’s commerce and industry division, and plans for the 1955 and 1956 cleanup campaigns. Correspondence and papers re cleanup activities in the city involve the Mid-South Chicago Council, Hyde Park-Kenwood Community Con­ference, Garfield Park West Community Council, the Chicago park districts, and Citizens of Greater Chicago. A list of community conservation organizations an address given by Daley to school children, and newspaper clippings are also included.
 
Mayor Daley’s Citizens Committee for a Cleaner Chicago, 1956 Box 46, Folder 463 to 464
Note Folders contain committee agenda, a statement of goals and objectives, suggestions for citizen participation, and minutes of meetings re conditions on Archer Street. Correspondence and papers involve the Chicago park districts and fire departments and the Columbus Park Council. Also included in the folders are membership lists from the Garfield Park West Community Council and the Mid-South Chicago Council, a list of community organizations in Chicago, mimeographed publicity sheets and handouts, newspaper clippings, and a cleanup manual for community chairmen.
 
Mayor Daley’s Citizens Committee for a Cleaner Chicago, 1957 Box 46, Folder 465
Note Folder contains a calendar of events, suggestions for committee membership and program, plans and progress report re a membership drive, outline of a community participation program, a membership list of the committee’s planning and policy committee, material re community plans and programs, and newspaper clippings.
Box 47
Mayor Daley’s Citizens Committee for a Cleaner Chicago, 1958 Box 47, Folder 466
Note Monthly progress reports, plans for the annual parade a calendar of events, meeting agenda, and material re a Chicago official’s visit to Paris to discuss the Chicago cleanup program, and local community cleanup activities. Newspaper clippings are included.
 
Mayor Daley’s Citizens Committee for a Cleaner Chicago, 1959-1961 Box 47, Folder 467
Note Monthly progress reports are accompanied by material re the committee’s membership and participation drive, holiday weekend cleanup programs, and plans for the annual parade. Newspaper clippings are included.
 
Mayor Daley’s Citizens Committee for a Cleaner Chicago, 1962-1964 Box 47, Folder 468
Note Folder contains material re the awards luncheon, air pollution, incorporation of safe-driving messages into the cleanup campaign, and parade plans.
 
Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Juvenile Delinquency, 1955-1956 Box 47, Folder 469
Note Folder contains the City Club of Chicago’s proposal for the appointment of an advisory committee on juvenile delinquency and correspondence from Hoehler apprising the mayor of developments within the newly appointed committee. The difference of opinion among the committee members re the committee’s role and the need for staff is especially noted in the latter material. Reference to work done in New York City in the field of juvenile delinquency and a speech, "Is There a Crisis Among Youth Today," are also included.
 
Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Youth Welfare, 1957-July, 1958 Box 47, Folder 470
Note Folder contains reports on youth conferences, including Community Mobilization for Youth; summary of other Chicago Youth Commission projects; a survey of youth opinions re peer groups, adults, curfews, etc.; mention of camps for delinquent youth; discussion of juvenile delinquency; newspaper clippings; and a committee membership list.
 
Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Youth Welfare, July-August, 1958 Box 47, Folder 471
Note Primarily drafts of a comprehensive committee report to the mayor outlining recommendations for a city youth program. The creation of a commission on youth, the expansion of the police juvenile force, expansion of psychiatric facilities in court, etc. are among the recommendations. Folder also contains an outline of the committee’s goals and a membership list.
 
Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Youth Welfare, August, 1958 Box 47, Folder 472
Note The final report of the committee to the mayor outlining recommendations for a city youth program. Discussion deals with such matters as law enforce­ment, schools, churches, health, recreation, correctional institutions, and courts. The creation of a commission on youth welfare is among the specific recommendations made.
 
Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Youth Welfare, September, 1958-1960  Box 47, Folder 473
Note Material primarily re the creation of a Chicago commission on youth and the organization of an advisory committee to serve the commission. A report of the advisory committee executive committee, a proposal for a parent education program and a Chicago Commission on Youth Welfare newsletter are also included.
 
Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Youth Welfare, 1957-1958 Box 47, Folder 474
Note Minutes, statement of objectives, and preliminary report describe problems and make recommendations for improved services. Statements re health ser­vices and juvenile delinquency issued by the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, a report on the Community Mobilization for Youth workshops, a Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago proposal for a community organization project in the area of mental health services, a subcommittee membership list, and a newspaper article by Eleanor Roosevelt on juvenile delinquency are also included. Bruno Bettleheitn is mentioned and James J. Brennan is a correspondent.
Box 48
Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Youth Welfare, Subcommittee on Physical and Mental Health, 1957-1958 Box 48, Folder 475
Note (continued from previous folder)
 
Mayor’s Commission on Rehabilitation to Persons, 1955-1956 Box 48, Folder 476
Note Correspondence and papers generated by a subcommittee of the Mayor’s Committee on Rehabilitation of Man charged with planning a treatment center for alcoholics and other derelicts. Material documents the planning and appointment of the Mayor’s Commission, on the Rehabilitation of Persons to oversee the operation of the treatment center. Folder also includes letters of inquiry to other metropolitan centers inquiring about facilities for the treatment of alcoholics and a letter describing conditions in the Monroe Street Court.
 
Mayor’s Commission on Rehabilitation of Persons, 1957 Box 48, Folder 477 to 478
Note Commission minutes, correspondence, and papers deal with the alcoholic treatment center’s objectives, the establishment of policies and procedures for the center, the relation of the commission to the Mayor’s Committee on the Rehabilitation of Man, and the nature and extent of alcoholism in the United States. Commission membership lists, a speech by Hoehler entitled "Role of the Social Agencies in Helping the Alcoholic," and an issue of World Health containing information re alcoholism are also included in the folder.
 
Mayor’s Commission on Rehabilitation of Persons, 1958 Box 48, Folder 479 to 480
Note Commission minutes, correspondence, and papers con­tain material re the Chicago Alcoholic Treatment Center; information re the budget, staff needs, status of discharged patients, and a proposed pay plan for patients is included. Folder also contain criticism of publicity about the success of the treatment center, plans for an all-Chicago symposium on alcoholism, a report on the Chicago Salvation Army’s work with alcoholics, and material re the establishment of a treatment center for alcoholic women.
 
Mayor’s Commission on Rehabilitation of Persons, 1959-1960  Box 48, Folder 481
Note Commission minutes, correspondence, and papers include the Chicago Alcoholic Treatment Center’s annual report and information re the personnel and budget. Material also includes newspaper clippings and statistics re the incidence of alcoholism in skid rows in the United States.
 
Mayor’s Commission on Rehabilitation of Persons, 1961-1962 Box 48, Folder 482
Note Commission minutes, subcommittee reports, correspondence, and papers deal with patients served by the Chicago Alcoholic Treatment Center, admission policies of the center, teenage drinking problems, increasing crime in Chicago’s skid row, center plans for 1962, outpatient treatment center for alcoholic women, a proposed education program for the commission, and work done by the Salvation Army with Chicago’s skid row alcoholics. Membership lists of the commission’s subcommitees and a proposal for a unified city-county department of corrections are also included.
 
Mayor’s Commission on Rehabilitation of Persons, 1963-1965 Box 48, Folder 483
Note Commission minutes, a report of a review committee studying the commission, correspondence, and papers contain discussions of the commission’s role and objectives, a study of and proposed program for female alcoholics, the Chicago Alcoholic Treatment Center’s funding, the expansion of the center’s facilities, and a proposed seminar about the treat­ment center. A list of Chicago facilities for treatment of alcoholism, an article re the treatment center, and committee reports on skid row, education work, and youth are also included.
Box 49
Mayor’s Commission on Senior Citizens, 1956-September, 1959  Box 49, Folder 484
Note Material re the commission’s budget, suggested projects for the commission, the establishment of a day center and clinic for the elderly, the Forand bill, the need for adult education classes for senior citizens, and a conference on planning for retirement. Folder also contains commission committee minutes, a statement of a union spokes­man, and speeches entitled "Improving Employment Opportunities for Older Workers," "Basic Information on the Aged," "Financing Health Care for the Aged—the Role of Voluntary Health Insurance," and "Recreation and Profit for Senior Citizens." Karl Menninger is a correspondent.
 
Mayor’s Commission on Senior Citizens, October, 1959-1964  Box 49, Folder 485 to 486
Note Commission’s annual report, material from New York City’s advisory committee on the aged re a reading program for senior citizens, a transcript from a radio program ("A Question of Age"), a memorandum re means of improving the economic and social status of older persons, and information re health care for the aged and Chicago’s "Adventures in Living" exposition for the elderly. A citation for excellence from Melville H. Hosch of the US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare is also included.
 
Mayor’s Committee on Community Welfare, 1955-February, 1956 Box 49, Folder 487
Note Formed in response to racial tensions in Trumbell Park homes, the committee concerned itself with racial friction in all of Chicago. Folder contains a report on racial friction in housing projects, a labor union statement on Negroes and minority rights, and minutes and reports from subcommittees on neighborhood education and housing and employment and community services. A rough draft of the final report on employment and community services is included.
 
Mayor’s Committee on Community Welfare, February-October, 1956 Box 49, Folder 488
Note Material includes the employment and community services subcommittee’s report on merit employment in Chicago. Interview results re integration of a Chicago neighborhood and an American Friends Service Committee report on the disturbance at Trumbull Park are also in the folder.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, June-September, 1956 Box 49, Folder 489
Note Folder contains progress reports on the committee’s activities, information elicited by the Immigrants’ Protective League re Chicago agencies’ work with immigrants and newcomers to Chicago, a Chicago Urban League request for official city participa­tion in the league’s "Master Plan for Democratic Living," statistics re Chicago Travelers Aid Society’s service to newcomers, proposals for a city bureau or department of migration services, and proceedings of the Fourth Chicago Conference on Civic Unity (1952). Also included is material re a training program for urban living for American Indians, recreational facilities available to new residents, and plans for a city-sponsored con­ference on race relations.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, September-December, 1956 Box 49, Folder 490
Note Papers include committee minutes, a statement of objectives of the committee, a committee membership list, progress reports on activities of the sub-committees on public and private services, and discussions re the relation of the committee to the Chicago Commission on Human Relations. Material contains as well information re the Chicago Travelers Aid Society’s work with new residents, proposed programs and services for new residents, and the variety of programs (including educational ones) available to newcomers. A draft of a manual re urban living and the Uptown Chicago Commission’s comments on needs of migrants are also found in this folder.
Box 50
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, January-May, 1957 Box 50, Folder 491
Note Papers include summaries re the committee’s activities, minutes of the migration services committee, committee membership lists, and correspondence re the need to re-analyze the nature of new residents’ problems and to redirect efforts intended to aid them. Discussions of the Kenmore-Uptown Center, the role of ministers in work with newcomers, the prevention of polio, and residency requirements for general assistance are also included. "Newcomer Study 1956" by the Travelers Aid Society of Chicago is also found in the folder.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, May-December, 1957 Box 50, Folder 492
Note Correspondence and papers contain a Chicago Urban League memorandum on the in-migrant situation, committee on migration services minutes, minutes from the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago subcommittee on welfare services centers, reports re racial disturbances in Calumet Park, and material indicating NAACP’s concern over such disturbances. Folder also has material, including a substantial letter from Karl Menninger, on American Indians in urban areas. The Chicago Federation of Settlements and Neighborhood Center is mentioned.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, December, 1957 Box 50, Folder 493
Note Material re work of the Chicago Commission on Human Relations, a manual for Puerto Ricans re adjusting to life in Chicago, and a committee membership list.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, 1958 Box 50, Folder 494 to 495
Note Folders contain committee minutes, monthly reports from the migration service department, committee budget material, a proposal for public education re race relations, and a proposal from the Uptown Chicago Commission for an orientation center for new residents. Material also includes information re Hungarian relief, conditions for American Indians in Chicago, an education program for new residents taught by retired teachers, the need for adult education, and the establishment of an advisory com­mittee on Spanish-speaking people for the Mayor’s Committee on New Residents.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, 1959 Box 50, Folder 496
Note Committee minutes are accompanied by material re the mayor’s committee’s advisory committee for Spanish-speaking people, a workshop on Appalachian migrants, a proposal for an adjustment institute for new residents, and program plans of the Chicago Commission on Human Relations.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, 1960 Box 50, Folder 497 to 498
Note Minutes, annual reports, budget information and subcommittee membership lists. Folders also contain material re business practices and credit buying, proposals for credit legislation, YWCA club activities with Southern white newcomers, the Cook County public aid department welfare rehabilitation services, the advisory committee for Spanish-speaking people, a conference on civic unity, and small Chicago churches. A statistical analysis of services given at the information centers for new residents is also found in the folders.
Box 51
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, 1961 Box 51, Folder 499
Note Minutes, correspondence, and papers include detailed descriptions of the neighborhood information and referral centers for new residents (including statistical analyses of services provided), information on Cuban refugees, proposals re credit legis­lation, and reports from Lake View Newcomer Committee which include reports on home visits to Southern white families.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, 1962 Box 51, Folder 500 to 501
Note Minutes, correspondence, and papers include an executive director’s report; analyses of services provided by neighborhood information centers; a detailed narrative report of activities of one neighborhood center; and speeches, reports, and directories entitled "Culture Makes a Difference," "The Growing Negro Middle Class in Chicago," "Directory of Agencies Engaged in Community Pro­grams of Youth Employment and Guidance in Chicago," "The Two Cultures and the Urban Revolution," and "The New Resident—His Educational Horizon." Cuban refugees, consumer problems, American Indians, and adult education are also discussed in these folders.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, 1963-1965 Box 51, Folder 502
Note Minutes, correspondence, and papers deal with consumer legislation, consumer education, credit protection programs, a Chicago television series designed to fight illiteracy, volunteer tutoring programs, and activities of a neighborhood infor­mation center. A committee membership list is also included.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, Subcommittee on Community Services, 1956 Box 51, Folder 503
Note Minutes, correspondence, and papers deal with recruitment of members, the establishment of subcommittee objectives, and the formation of the Chicago Commission on Human Relations. The cooperation of the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago and the Travelers Aid Society in working with new residents is discussed.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, Subcommittee on Private Services, 1956 Box 51, Folder 504
Note Minutes report the subcommittee’s goals and projects. Mention of the Travelers Aid Society’s participation in the work with newcomers and a proposal for the establishment of a neighborhood center to orient new residents to urban life are also included.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, Subcommittee on Public Services, 1955-1957 Box 51, Folder 505
Note Minutes report the subcommittee1s goals and projects. Relations with the Chicago Commission on Human Relations are discussed and a subcommittee membership list is also included.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, Reports, 1957-1958 Box 51, Folder 506
Note Semi-annual reports deal with race discrimination and tensions, a city-wide conference, and education, health and welfare services available to newcomers. Folder includes as well reports entitled "The Uptown Community Area and the Southern White In-Migrant" and "North Kenwood-Oakland Planning Program." A report indicating the educational level, previous residence, family composition, occupation, etc. of new residents is also contained in the folder.
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, Reports, 1959 Box 51, Folder 507
Note Semi-annual reports describe the newcomers’ problems and the projects designed to deal with them. Folder also contains a report on the Southern Appalachian Tour Workshop directed by Berea College, the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago’s recommendations re the Chicago board of health, and a report re work with newcomers in Cincinnati ("Ministry to the Southern Mountaineer").
 
Mayor’s Committee on New Residents, Report, 1960 Box 51, Folder 508
Note Annual report contains information re the racial composition of newcomers, the problems faced by new residents, information centers, and the committee’s membership and interest in credit legislation. A booklet prepared for Puerto Ricans to aid in the adjustment to urban life is also included in the folder.
Box 52
Mayor’s Committee on the United Nations, 1954-September, 1955 Box 52, Folder 509
Note Primarily material re planning for the Chicago commemoration of the UN’s tenth anniversary. Folder also includes correspondence from the US Committee for the United Nations and from the American Association of the UN. The latter material contains information re seminars and the church liaison committee’s plans for a mass meeting.
 
Mayor s Committee on the United Nations, September-December, 1955 Box 52, Folder 510
Note Primarily material re plans for the celebration of UN Week. Adlai Stevenson, Laird Bell, Edith Sampson, Archibald Carey, and Danny Kaye are mentioned. A committee membership list and material from the US Committee for the UN and the American Associa­tion for the UN are also included.
 
Mayor’s Committee on the United Nations, 1956-September, 1958 Box 52, Folder 511
Note Primarily material re plans for the celebration of UN Week. A Committee membership list is included. Norman Ross, committee chairman, is a prominent correspondent.
 
Mayor’s Committee on the United Nations, October, 1958-1963 Box 52, Folder 512
Note Primarily material re plans for the celebration of UN Week. Folder also includes a committee membership list, American Association for the UN minutes and budget, a speech by Jacob Blaustein on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and mention of Edith Sampson, Pauline Frederick, and Adlai Stevenson.
 
Merchant Seaman, 1958-1961 Box 52, Folder 513
Note Primarily correspondence re the need to establish community and welfare services for seamen in Chicago. Folder also contains material re a conference on the merchant seamen, and a letter and report from the American Social Health Association re the open­ing of the St. Lawrence Seaway and its impact on Great Lake Port cities. A speech by Leo Perils is included.
 
Metropolitan Fair and Exposition Authority, 1957 Box 52, Folder 514
Note A report re selection of a site for Chicago’s exposition hall and civic center.
 
National Inter-Church Hospital Association, 1956-1957 Box 52, Folder 515
Note Material gathered during an investigation of Reverand Amos H. Carnegie and his fund-raising plans for a Negro hospital.
 
New York Cleanup Program, 1955 Box 52, Folder 516
Note Material re New York City’s anti-litter campaign.
 
Physical and Social Planning, 1958-1964 Box 52, Folder 517
Note Minutes of a discussion group deal with physical and social planning. Folder also includes material re civic museums and encouragement of the arts.
Box 53
Recreation, 1955-1956 Box 53, Folder 518
Note Correspondence re the proposed reorganization of various recreation units in Chicago.
 
Sheriff’s Advisory Committee on Juvenile Delinquency, 1955-1959 Box 53, Folder 519 to 520
Note Primarily copies of papers presented at a committee-sponsored conference, the "Searchlight on Delinquency." A summary of the Chicago Youth Commission’s considerations of juvenile delinquency, material from the Mayor’s Committee on Juvenile Delinquency, and the Sheriff’s public annual report are also included. Eunice Shriver is among the correspondents.
 
Urban Redevelopment, 1956-1960 Box 53, Folder 521
Note Folder contains material re recreation, health, and welfare in Chicago housing projects; an urban renewal clinic; personnel problems in the Chicago Housing Authority; and complaints from a prospective housing project tenant. An annual report of the Chicago Housing Authority and testimony given by Daley re community conservation and urban renewal are also included. Edith Sampson is a correspondent.
 
Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, 1958-1959 Box 53, Folder 522
Note Limited correspondence re city standards for nursery school buildings.
 
World Flower Show, 1958-1960 Box 53, Folder 523
Note Correspondence re plans and arrangements for the World Flower Show.
 
Chicago Board of Health, Advisory Committee to Mental Health Sections, 1960-1961 Box 53, Folder 524
Note Minutes and reports provide brief descriptions of efforts to organize a municipal mental health program in Chicago.
 
Chicago Citizens Committee on Displaced Persons, 1947-1949 Box 53, Folder 525
Note Folder includes correspondence, reports, budgets, and clippings re efforts to secure legislation to allow World War II refugees to immigrate to the US.
 
Chicago Community Inventory Appraisal Committee, 1948-1950 Box 53, Folder 526
Note Correspondence arranging committee meetings is accompanied by material re the history, activities, and finances of the Chicago Community Inventory, an organization doing survey work for social and welfare agencies.
 
Chicago Council on Foreign Relations, 1954-1962 Box 53, Folder 527
Note Board of directors minutes, correspondence, budget reports, audits, nominating committee minutes and a report evaluating the council’s "Great Decisions" program. Lists of the council’s corporate sponsors, the advisory council members, council officers, and nominees for the World Understanding Award are also included.
 
Chicago Urban League, 1946-1949 Box 53, Folder 528
Note Correspondence, reports, and clippings detail the controversy surrounding a study which recommended extensive reorganization of the league (including the resignation of the board and executive director). The Chicago Community Fund, of which Hoehler was executive director, apparently became involved in the situation through its budget allocation.
 
Cincinnati Welfare and Safety Departments  
Box 53
Barter Units and Homesteads, 1933-1935 Box 53, Folder 529 to 530
Note Folders contain material re a proposed subsistence homestead and the operation and liquidation of a shoe factory operated on the barter system with support from the Ohio Federal Relief Administration. A constitution of a Dayton (Ohio) homestead unit, a list of subsistence homestead units operated as part of the federal government relief program, a reorganization plans for the Hamilton County barter units, and minutes of the planning committee for the proposed subsistence farm are also included.
Box 54
Cincinnati Cooperatives, 1935-1948 Box 54, Folder 531 to 534
Note Hoehler served as the trustee for a Federal Emergency Relief Administration grant that was administered as loans to Cincinnati cooperatives. Folders contain correspondence and papers re the organizational and financial affairs of several consumer cooperatives. Mention of the Rochdale plan of organization is included.
 
Disaster Council, 1937 Box 54, Folder 535
Note Minutes and related material generated during the January flood. Matters such as the conservation of water and power, the distribution of food and supplies, the development of recreation programs for flood victims, the operation of shelter units, the cooperation of the Red Cross, and racial discrimination in the recovery planning are discussed. The Cincinnati disaster code is also included.
 
Gifts, 1932-1935 Box 54, Folder 536-538
Note Correspondence re the donation of money to the Cincinnati and Hamilton County public welfare department to be used in local relief efforts.
Box 55
Gifts,  Box 55, Folder 539
Note (Continued from previous folder)
 
Federal Emergency Relief Administration, 1935 Box 55, Folder 540
Note Folder includes correspondence with Aubrey Williams of the FERA re emergency work program. Other material deals primarily with the impending termina­tion of federal funds to the states for direct relief, Ohio’s official resistance to authorizing state funds for direct relief, and the need for federal aid in caring for transients. The WPA is mentioned.
 
Miscellaneous Correspondence and Papers, 1934-1936 Box 55, Folder 541
Note Material includes an announcement of a women’s exposition, suggestions of Cincinnati women for membership on a Jane Addams Memorial Fund committee, a report on crime prevention, and a proposal for "after school education."
 
National Youth Administration, 1935 Box 55, Folder 542
Note Bulk of the folder pertains to the selection and appointment of persons to the Youth Administration in Ohio; Hoehler served on the advisory committee of the NYA for Ohio. Principles of successful use of volunteers and a discussion of programs designed to provide youth with training and experience are included. Aubrey Williams is a correspondent.
 
Relief Efforts, 1928-1931 Box 55, Folder 543
Note Minutes of the Committee to Stabilize Employment reflect efforts to determine the extent of unemployment and to devise means of stabilizing employment. Bulk of folder consists of radio addresses entitled "Employment Agencies and Unemployment Clearance," "What Some Concerns Have Done to Stabilize Employment Means to the Average Man," "The Cincinnati Plan for Unemployment Relief," "The Part Labor Can Play in Preventing Unemployment," and "Handling an Unemployment Emergency." Material also contains annual reports (1928 and 1931) of the Cincinnati Division of Public Welfare, a survey summary re the Industrial status of and opportunities for Negroes in Cincinnati, and accounts of money appropriated to private relief agencies.
 
Relief Efforts, 1931-1932 Box 55, Folder 544
Note A semi-annual report of the Cincinnati welfare department, a Work Relief Bureau report (statement of expenditures, history, and description of activities), a report of the Permanent Committee on Stabilizing Employment re the rapidly increasing relief needs and the inadequate funds available, a community chest report re the numbers of relief cases and the cost and suburban location of relief efforts, the Industrial Relief Fund statement of expenditures, and an account of the number of cases and relief expenditures in Cincinnati and Hamilton County, 1928-1931.
 
Relief Efforts, 1932-1933 Box 55, Folder 545
Note Folder contains a detailed statement of unemployment relief needs for Hamilton County, the Industrial Relief Fund financial report, a report on the Hamilton County relief commissary, a detailed report on the organizational arrangements for relief administration in Hamilton County, statements of appropriations and expenditures for relief in Hamilton County, a statement of purposes and policies of the state relief commission, and correspondence re problems in the distribution of food.
 
Relief Efforts, 1933-1936 Box 55, Folder 546
Note Material includes the public welfare department director’s report, a review of welfare department expenditures (1926-1933), a 1936 annual report of the welfare department, and correspondence re the funding of relief workers.
Box 56
Sheffield Farm, 1933-1937 Box 56, Folder 547 to 551
Note Correspondence and papers (particularly financial records) detail the operation of the farm. Leased by the Hamilton County public welfare department in order to provide work and produce, the farm was converted to a cooperative in May, 1935, when it was no longer supported by county relief funds.
 
State Committee on Relief Planning and Financing, 1935 Box 56, Folder 552
Note Primarily correspondence and papers re the need to provide adequate state funding for relief in Ohio when federal funds for direct relief were stopped. Discussions of the means for raising funds, an estimate of the amount required, analyses of current relief costs, and a plan for liquidation of direct relief in Ohio are included. Marc Grossman, committee chairman, and Ohio Governor Martin L. Davey are subjects and correspondents.
 
Works Progress Administration, 1935 Box 56, Folder 553
Note Correspondence and papers discuss the appointment of a Works Progress Administrator for Hamilton County and proposed WPA projects. A program from a regional conference on WPA is also included. Harry Hopkins is mentioned.
Box 57
Citizen’s Advisory Committee on Point Four, 1955 Box 57, Folder 554
Note Limited correspondence and papers re the establishment of this committee to appraise and influence national policy decisions re foreign economic aid programs.
 
Citizen’s Blue Ballot Information Committee, 1956 Box 57, Folder 555
Note Correspondence and pamphlets re a proposed revenue amendment in Illinois.
 
Citizens of Greater Chicago  
Box 57
Correspondence and Papers, 1952 Box 57, Folder 556
Note Papers describe the events which culminated in the incorporation of Citizens of Greater Chicago. Bylaws, a proposed budget, material re the organization’s purpose and proposed projects, and an article entitled "Modernizing Chicago’s Municipal Machinery" by Herbert Emmerich are included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, January-September, 1953 Box 57, Folder 557
Note Reports, bulletins, material from the annual meeting, the CGC newspaper, and related papers detail CGC’s history, purpose, and activities. Correspondence re the organization’s financial situation and the Chicago Civic Federation’s refusal to join CGC, a list of donations, and a request to CGC from the Chicago Community Inventory for funds are included. Folder also contains correspondence from Jessie Binford inquiring about individual membership in CGC.
 
Correspondence and Papers, October-December, 1953 Box 57, Folder 558
Note Bulletins and executive director’s annual report provide information re CGC’s budget and activities, particularly its efforts to achieve legislative reform. A letter from Adlai Stevenson, a list of CGC officers and board of directors, material re prevention of juvenile delinquency, a speech by Hoehler entitled "A Blueprint for Civic Maturity," and an editorial re the elimination of the ward organization for municipal elections are also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, January-June, 1954 Box 57, Folder 559
Note Bulletins, news releases, budget material, an analysis of Chicago suburbs, a detailed account of building code enforcement in Chicago, a script entitled "Chicago Challenge," and lists of business and industrial representatives to CGC and of suggest­ed members for the advisory board. Folder also contains correspondence with the state’s attorney of Cook County and the president of the Chicago Crime Commission re CGC’s proposal to function as a clearing house for the reporting of law violations.
 
Correspondence and Papers, July-December, 1954-1955, 1959 Box 57, Folder 560
Note Report of annual meeting, board of directors minutes, budget statements, an audit, a summary history of CGC, material re the campaign for the reapportionment amendment, and lists of CGC officers, board of directors, committees, and corporate donations. Folder also includes the final report of CGC’s special committee to study the organization’s structure, program, and financing as well as both HoehlerTs and Robert Farwell’s comments on the report.
 
Foundations (local), 1954-1955 Box 57, Folder 561
Note Correspondence requesting financial support.
 
Foundations (national), 1954 Box 57, Folder 562
Note Correspondence outlines project proposals and requests for financial support.
 
Citizens School Committee, 1949-1963 Box 57, Folder 563
Note Folder contains bylaws, board of directors minutes, financial reports, a list of contributions, and in­formation re this Chicago organization’s efforts to combat political pressure within the Chicago school board and to improve the quality of education. Federal aid to schools is briefly discussed; Henry Toy of the National Citizens Council for Better Schools is a correspondent.
Box 58
City Club of Chicago, 1947-1949, 1953-1954 Box 58, Folder 564
Note Minutes from the club’s board of governors and reports of several of its study committees on such topics as national affairs, Chicago city planning, housing, federal aid to schools, and social welfare (particularly the care of children in Illinois).
 
Commission on the Financing of Hospital Care, 1952-1954 Box 58, Folder 565 to 567
Note Correspondence, executive committee minutes, financial reports, proceedings of commission meetings, committee reports (especially re workshops on nonwage and low wage income groups), suggestions and outlines of proposed study programs for the commission, a statement of the commission’s area of study, and interim and final commission reports. Membership lists of this international commission are included as well.
 
Committee for an Effective Foreign Aid Program, 1956 Box 58, Folder 568
Note Limited material re the committee’s goals and strategy.
 
Committee on a Federal Department of Health, Education, and Security, 1945-1948 Box 58, Folder 569 to 570
Note Jointly sponsored by the American Council on Education and the National Social Welfare Assembly, the committee considered the possible scope, function, and organization of the proposed federal department of health, education, and security. Minutes, working papers, summary conclusions, and final reports detail these considerations. US Senate testimony of Elizabeth Wickenden of the American Public Welfare Associa­tion is also included.
 
Community Fund of Chicago, 1945-1953 Box 58, Folder 571 to 572
Note Annual meeting minutes and reports, board of directors minutes, bylaws, budget material, and lists of officers, board of directors, committee members, campaign leaders, and staff. Folders contain considerable material re annual fund-raising campaigns. The fraudulent International Relief Association, competition for funds from suburbs, and the Back of the Yards Neighborhood Council are mentioned.
Box 59
Cook County Bureau of Public Welfare Advisory Board, 1947-1950 Box 59, Folder 573 to 574
Note Board minutes deal with a variety of subjects including legislation, staff salaries and per­sonnel administration, the operation and adminis­tration of particular institutions, ADC benefits, adoption policies, etc. Board membership lists, a report re the development of a comprehensive child welfare program in Cook County, newsletters from the public assistance division, a report on the bureau’s criminal court service, and cor­respondence with the Illinois Public Aid Commission are also included in the folders.
 
Council of State Governments Technical Advisory Committee on Mental Health, 1949-1950 Box 59, Folder 575
Note The committee designed questionnaires re facilities for the mentally ill for a mental health study conducted by the council. Correspondence, memoranda, and sample questionnaires are included in the folder; Frank Bane is the primary correspondent.
 
Council of State Governments Technical Advisory Committee on Mental Health, 1951-1954, 1958 Box 59, Folder 576
Note Primarily correspondence re the council’s study of research, training, and prevention in the field of mental health. The final report on research and training is included. Frank Bane is a prominent correspondent.
 
Democratic Advisory Council Committee on Social Security, 1960 Box 59, Folder 577
Note Background material, drafts, and final committee report entitled "Democratic Program for Social Security."
 
Economic Club of Chicago, 1947-1949 Box 59, Folder 578
Note Brief correspondence re Hoehler’s membership in the club.
 
Executives Club of Chicago, 1946-1950 Box 59, Folder 579
Note Limited correspondence generated by Hoehler’s work on the club’s speakers table committee.
 
Federal Civil Defense Administration, Advisory Committee on Emergency Welfare Services, 1951-1952 Box 59, Folder 580
Note Primarily correspondence arranging committee meetings. Federal Civil Defense Administration advisory bulletins and policy memorandum (the latter on pre-attack evacuation) and discussion of the Red Cross, cooperation with state governments, and the Federal Security Agency are also included. Folder contains a letter from Martha Eliot.
 
Federal Security Agency, 1950-1952 Box 59, Folder 581
Note Correspondence re 1950 amendments to the Social Security Act as they affected the administration and delivery of children’s health and welfare services. Regional conferences organized by the US Children’s Bureau, standards for the establishment of a state institution for the aged, and possible foreign assignments for Hoehler are also discussed. Mildred Arnold is a correspondent.
Box 60
George Williams College, 1946-1952 Box 60, Folder 582 to 583
Note Bulk of the folders is comprised of fund-raising correspondence. Budgets agenda, and committee minutes are included as well.
 
Hyde Park-Kenwood Community Conference, 1953-1957 Box 60, Folder 584
Note Primarily material generated by the conference’s financial committee and fund-raising efforts. Material about the organization’s history, policy, and programs and a statement re interracial stability as a requisite for effective community action is also included.
 
Illinois Association for Mental Health (formerly Illinois Society for Mental Health)  
Box 60
Correspondence and Papers, 1953-1954 Box 60, Folder 585 to 586
Note Board of directors minutes of the society deal with a variety of topics including salaries for mental health professionals, finances, and the possibility of a separate mental health department in the Illinois government bureaucracy. Folders also contain finance committee minutes; staff reports; a statement concerning the American Psychiatric Association report on Illinois mental hospitals; a detailed account of the society’s purpose, activities, and problems; a report from the society’s education director; and material re affiliation with the National Association for Mental Health, the society’s relation to its Illinois affiliates, and an institute for medical health officers. A list of society board of directors, material from a dinner honoring Hoehler and Adlai Stevenson, and a detailed proposal which suggests that the society conduct a public information campaign re current developments in the state welfare department are included as well.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1955 Box 60, Folder 587 to 588
Note Board of directors minutes reveal the society’s concern about the Illinois public welfare department budget legislation re mental health, the society’s financial situation, and community mental health planning. Folders also contain treasurer’s reports, executive committee minutes, revisions and final copy of an evaluation of the American Psychiatric Association’s report on mental hospitals in Illinois, a recommendation that the society strengthen its relationship with its Illinois affiliates and become a "statewide society in fact as well as name," and material re financial arrangements with the National Association for Mental Health. The William Healy School is mentioned.
Box 61
Correspondence and Papers, 1956 Box 61, Folder 589 to 590
Note Board of directors minutes and committee reports reflect the society’s interest in community mental health, children’s facilities in Minnesota, and reorganization of the society and the establishment of a separate Chicago chapter. Society treasurer’s reports, a board of directors membership list, bylaws of the National Association for Mental Health, and a paper entitled "Evaluating Mental Health Programs" are also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1957 Box 61, Folder 591 to 593
Note An annual report, board of directors minutes, executive committee minutes, steering committee on reorganization minutes, treasurer’s reports, and correspondence and related papers reflect the reorgani­zation, of the society, a process resulting in the establishment of a separate mental health society of Chicago and the enlargement of the statewide functions of the Illinois Society for Mental Health. Material re the Chicago Community Fund, the Federal Service Campaign, halfway houses, the organization of local mental health community groups, a concentrated fund-raising campaign for the National Association for Mental Health and the Illinois Society for Mental Health, a proposed educational project re the psychological or psychiatric aspects of racial relations, cooperation with the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, and the purpose, function, and organization, of the Mental Health Society of Greater Chicago is also contained in these folders. Included as well are National Association for Mental Health bylaws, a list of Illinois mental health associations, and Illinois Society for Mental Health committee membership lists.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1958-1965 Box 61, Folder 594 5o 595
Note Board of directors minutes reflect the continuing process of reorganization of the Illinois Society for Mental Health resulting in the establishment of the Mental Health Society of Greater Chicago and the change of name in the state organization from the Illinois Society for Mental Health to the Illinois Association for Mental Health. Minutes and papers of the Chicago society describe its budget, organization, and program. Folders also contain bylaws of the IAMH, an executive director’s report, progress reports on the IAMH legislative program and other activities, treasurer’s reports, and lists of IAMH officers, board members, and committees. Material from the National Association for Mental Health outlining programs and principles re childhood mental illness, com­munity mental health services, and mental hospitals is included. A fact sheet re mental health problems in Illinois, a statement of the director of the Illinois Department of Mental Health re services for children and their families and mention of the Federal Services Campaign are also found in the folders.
 
Illinois Citizens Education Council, 1956-1965 Box 61, Folder 596
Note Primarily an organization of laymen, the council was originally named the Illinois Citizens Education Committee. Correspondence, minutes of general meetings and executive board meetings, the constitution and bylaws, and membership and committee lists reflect the council’s interest in citizen participation, the development of a training course for school board members, junior colleges, etc. James B. Conant and the National Citizens Council for Better Schools are mentioned.
Box 62
Illinois Citizens Education Council,  Box 62, Folder 597
Note (Continued from previous folder)
 
Illinois Department of Public Welfare  
Box 62
Correspondence and Papers, 1948-1952 Box 62, Folder 598-600
Note Folders contain material re the budget, administration organization, and legislative program of the department. Folders also contain material re functions of mental health centers, deporting mental patients, the laws and practices pertaining to the administration of state psychiatric services, the budget needs of Cook County Hospital social service department, staff moral, and a legal suit re the pay plan for state hospital patients. Minutes from the Illinois Mental Health Advisory Committee and the Illinois Committee on Aging, a study of juvenile commitments to Illinois training schools (1936-1939 and 1946-1949), Republican news releases charging Hoehler with incompetence and corruption as administrator of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare, and Hoehler’s reply to the charges are included as well. Folders also contain correspondence from Jessie Binford re the women’s reformatory, a discussion of reorganization plans after Stevenson’s election, Hoehler correspondence to Governor-elect Stratton, and material from the Illinois Welfare Association annual conference. George B. McKibbin, Robert Beasley, and Percival Baily are correspondents and subjects.
 
Correspondence and Papers, January-March,1953 Box 62, Folder 601
Note Considerable correspondence with Karl Menninger re accomplishments realized in the department during Hoehler’s tenure and developments occurring under the succeeding Republican administration. Hoehler’s resignation letter to Governor Stratton and Hoehler’s reply to the newspaper articles re increased public welfare costs under Hoehler’s administration are included. Folder also contains various department memoranda, minutes from the Illinois Mental Health Advisory Committee, and information re a film sponsored by the National Association for Mental Health.
 
Correspondence and Papers, April-December, 1953 Box 62, Folder 602
Note Material on the Illinois Committee on Aging’s problems under Stratton’s administration, CIO complaints re Stratton’s reduced welfare budgets, legislative funding policies, proposed legislation for the Illinois Department of Public Welfare, proposed projects to be funded by the state Mental Health Fund, and the need for mental health care on the community level. A study of applicants for state hospital attendant jobs, the final report of the Emergency Conference on Mental Health and Welfare Needs (a group organized to oppose Stratton’s budget cuts), and various department memoranda are also included. Mrs. Edison Dick is among the correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1954-1965 Box 62, Folder 603 to 604
Note Material re criticism of Stratton’s administration of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare, the American Psychiatric Association’s report on Illinois state hospitals, conditions in a children’s home and reformatory for women, a state school parents’ association’s opposition to the patient pay plan, a legal suit re the patient pay plan, and difficulties in developing the volunteer services program. Folders also contain papers entitled "Illinois State Hospital Trends in Diagnostic Evaluation (1951-1953)" and "Prodomal Behavior Patterns in Mental Illness," an address by Robert Klein on state hospital problems, a speech by Otto Bettag (department director) on mental health services in Illinois, a report re education programs at the Illinois industrial school for boys and the training school for girls, national ratings of state expenditures for public care of the mentally ill, and Illinois mental health regulations.
Box 63
Administrative Regulations, June 25, 1952. Box 63, Folder 605
 
Advisory Committees and Commission, 1946-1950 Box 63, Folder 606
Note Membership lists of the various committees and commissions.
 
Advisory Hospital Council, 1950-1952 Box 63, Folder 607
Note Primarily correspondence arranging meetings.
 
American Public Welfare Association Study of Illinois Welfare Services, 1942 Box 63, Folder 608
 
Applications for State Employment, 1949-1952. Box 63, Folder 609 to 612
 
Budget and Revenue Material, 1949-1952 Box 63, Folder 613 to 614
Note Detailed figures for the 67th biennium budget includes comparison with the 66th biennium budget.
 
Chicago Civil Defense Exercise, 1950 Box 63, Folder 615
Note Agenda and summaries of discussions held during the exercise. Folder also contains reports and scenarios depicting plans for Chicago’s response to atomic attack and Hoehler’s outline of welfare services essential to a civil defense program.
 
Civil Defense, 1950-1951 Box 63, Folder 616
Note Correspondence and papers contain material re civil defense activities in Illinois, the role of the Red Cross in civil defense activities, the purchasing and stockpiling of supplies, information and registration forms to be used in civil defense work (comments particularly re the Federal Civil Defense Administration "Technical Manual on Registration and Information"), and criticism and discussion of the civil defense program of the Illinois DPW. Minutes of an advisory committee, a membership list of mental health committee of the state office of civil defense, and a report re psychiatric aspects of civil defense are also included. Correspondence involved James Bridle.
Box 64
Commission to Study State Government, 1949-1952 Box 64, Folder 617 to 618
Note Known as the "Little Hoover" Commission and the Schaefer Commission, the commission described and analyzed the operation of the Illinois state government. Folders contain correspondence and reports about welfare service. The need for decentralization of services and for more and better paid professional staff, the relation between state and local welfare responsibilities, and state care of the mentally ill in the United States are discussed.
 
Division of Research and Statistics, 1949 Box 64, Folder 619
Note Graphs and figures re the age, previous residence (urban or rural) , and economic status of state hospital patients. Material also includes the total number of patients, the patient-employee ratio, and statistics re overcrowding in Illinois state hospitals.
 
Governor’s Conference, 1949 Box 64, Folder 620
Note Summary of conference proceedings are accompanied by papers re recovery of mentally ill patients, the rebuilding and renovation of mental hospitals, home placements of mental patients, and social security changes.
 
Illinois Democratic Party, 1949-1952 Box 64, Folder 621
Note Correspondence to individuals and county and state central committees re personnel in the welfare department and the solicitation of support for the Democratic party.
 
Illinois. State Medical Journal, 1949 Box 64, Folder 622
Note Folder contains a series of articles intended to acquaint physicians with state facilities for the mentally ill.
 
Illinois State Training School for Boys, 1948-1952 Box 64, Folder 623
Note Correspondence re resisting political pressure and the need for physical discipline, for clarifying the school’s philosophy, and for the development of an effective publicity program. Folder also includes statistics re attendance and escapes in Canadian and American training schools, a list of research projects in state institutions, information and statistics re parole and return of boys to the training school, and a report re transfer of inmates between the training school and reformatory.
 
Robert H. Klein, 1949-1952 Box 64, Folder 624 to 626
Note Correspondence generated by Klein’s work as special deputy to the director of the Illinois DPW. Material deals with personnel matters and the administration and operation of the state hospitals. Issues such as the requirement of payments from patients or their relatives, merit pay for staff, the ordering of supplies, linen cleaning, reorganization of administrative offices, etc. are discussed.
 
Live Baby Exhibit, 1950-1951 Box 64, Folder 627
Note Correspondence raises questions re the legality and advisability of a nutrition exhibit sponsored by Swift and Co. and the University of Illinois College of Medicine. Plans called for the use of live babies in the display.
 
Mental Health Material, 1950-1953 Box 64, Folder 628
Note A fact sheet on mental health care in Illinois, a report on the Chicago board of health mental hygiene section, material re study of state psychiatric services, a report from Hoehler’s special deputy re problems and projects in the department, and detailed correspondence with the Taxpayers’ Federation about recommendations of the Commission to Study State Government re the state welfare department operations. Correspondence from William Menninger and articles by Hoehler and Erich Fromm are also included.
Box 65
Newspaper Clippings, 1948-1961. Box 65, Folder 629 to 631
 
Office Memoranda, 1949-1951 Box 65, Folder 632
Note Memoranda between Hoehler and his secretarial staff reflect Hoehler’s schedule and department matters.
 
Personnel Material, 1949-1952 Box 65, Folder 633
Note Primarily correspondence re political sponsorship and professional qualifications as bases for hiring personnel.
 
Personnel Study, 1950 Box 65, Folder 634
Note An evaluation of and proposals for revision of the department’s personnel management practices.
 
Press Releases, 1949-1952 Box 65, Folder 635 to 636
Note Old age, staff shortages and other problems of state institutions, Mental Health Week observances, the consultant visit of Karl Menninger, and the patient pay plan for state institution residents are among the topics mentioned in the releases.
Box 66
Proposed Legislation, 1949-1951 Box 66, Folder 637
Note Correspondence seeking reactions to proposed bills. A bill requiring the integration of the Illinois Public Aid Commission and the state welfare department receives special emphasis.
 
Publicity and Public Relations, 1949-1952 Box 66, Folder 638
Note Correspondence acknowledging informative reporting and interpretation on the part of newspapers is accompanied in this folder by material concerning the Illinois DPW’s publication, The Welfare Bulletin.
 
The Welfare Bulletin, 1950-1951. Box 66, Folder 639
 
Illinois Displaced Persons Commission  
Box 66
Correspondence and Papers, 1948-1949 Box 66, Folder 640
Note Minutes, executive secretary reports, and special reports; the latter includes one entitled "Are Displaced Persons Fitting into American Life?" and another which deals with the functions of the commission. Correspondence and papers contain speech material for Adlai Stevenson, material from a resettlement conference, clippings from a New Americans program at a Chicago fair, discussions of legislation, information re investigations of complaints from displaced persons located in Illinois, and a commission membership list. The Immigrants’ Protective League, the International Refugee Organization, and the Citizens Committee on Displaced Persons are subjects or correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1950 Box 66, Folder 641
Note Minutes of a commission meeting and of the commission’s executive committee; commission meeting minutes discuss education for displaced persons. Also included are commission membership lists, minutes from a meeting of representatives of state commissions on displaced persons, and correspondence re displaced persons and public aid, the placement of displaced orphans, the National Resettlement Conference, and alleged unsatisfactory administration of the Displaced Persons Law.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1951 Box 66, Folder 642
Note Considerable material re the utilization of displaced persons to meet the growing manpower shortage. Legislation, displaced persons’ complaints about their American employment situation, and public aid and displaced persons are discussed.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1952 Box 66, Folder 643
Note Folder contains material re the commission’s final report, President Truman’s Commission on Immigration and Naturalization, and the National Resettlement Conference. A speech by Herbert H. Lehman on immigration is included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, undated Box 66, Folder 644
Note Large report discusses immigration legislation, the United States’ responsibility for displaced persons, and the varieties of backgrounds and skills of displaced persons.
 
Illinois Welfare Association, Correspondence and Papers, 1946-1949 Box 66, Folder 645 to 646
Note Correspondence, board of directors minutes, and committee reports deal with the association’s consideration of and work for accreditation of social workers. Treasurers’ reports, the constitution, a statement of the association’s purpose and function, resolutions adopted at an IWA business meeting, membership reports, an organizational guide book, and committee lists are also included. Raymond Hilliard, Eleanor Proctor, and Edgar Witte are correspondents.
Box 67
Illinois Welfare Association, Committee on Accreditation, 1946-1949 Box 67, Folder 647
Note Correspondence, reports, and related material deal with planning and recruitment for the committee, collection of sample data re Illinois social workers, and analysis of the data collected. Qualifications for accreditation, accreditation of nurses in Illinois, and accreditation of public agency employees and social workers in other states are discussed. Corinne H. Brown, Raymond Hilliard, A. E. Rose, and William E. Skadden are correspondents.
 
International Conference of Social Work, and US Committee of ICSW  
Box 67
Correspondence and Papers, 1945-1946 Box 67, Folder 648
Note Correspondence, minutes, and related papers deal with the preparation for the reactivation of the ICSW. Appointment of US voting delegates to preparatory meetings, plans for the 4th International Conference to be held in Atlantic City, New Jersey, membership recruitment in the US, participation in the ICSW of citizens from Axis and neutral countries, relations with the UN, and the utilization of inter­national rather than Anglo-American leadership in the Conference are among the issues discussed. Hertha Krauss is mentioned in relation to her German nationality and her possible appointment as a voting US delegate to prepatory meetings. Plans for international relief after the termination of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and means for furthering mutual understanding between Britain and American social workers are also discussed. Charles Alspach, Jane Chandler, George Haynes, George Rabinoff, Howard Knight, Alexander Farquharson, Rene Sand, and Mary Van Kleeck are involved in the correspondence.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1947 Box 67, Folder 649 to 650
Note Folders consist primarily of correspondence and US Committee minutes re arrangements for the 4th International Conference to be held in 1948 at Atlantic City, New Jersey, in conjunction with the National Conference of Social Work. Correspondence also contains Mary Van Kleeck’s letter of resignation from the ICSW executive board, discussion of American domination of ICSW leadership, Edith Abbott’s inquiry re the proportion of women to men on US Committee committee assignments, comments about Howard Knight’s death, and material re fund-raising, ICSW history, and the proposed ICSW constitution. Joseph P. Anderson, Jane Chandler, George Haynes, Donald S. Howard, Agnes Myer, Howard R. Knight, and Rene Sand are correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1948 Box 67, Folder 651 to 652
Note Primarily correspondence and US Committee minutes re arrangements for the 4th International Conference and the ICSW’s administrative and program plans for continued organizational development after the 1948 meeting. Folders also contain material re fund-raising, the training and exchange of social work personnel, and the function, structure, and program of the ICSW. A US Committee list, a program from the 4th International Conference, and a bibliography on international social work are also included. Joseph Anderson, Joe Hoffer, George Haynes, George Rabinoff, and H.M.L.H. Sark are involved in the correspondence.
 
Correspondence and Papers, January-September, 1949 Box 67, Folder 653
Note Summary of ICSW executive committee meetings contains discussions of the Conference’s finances, plans for the periodic general and regional meetings, and reports re each of the national committees. US Committee minutes discuss finances, the membership drive, the function and organization of the committee, and the session on international social work at the 1949 National Conference of Social Work. Correspon­dence re the participation of Latin American countries in the ICSW, the Pan American Congress of Social Work, the need to contemplate the philosophical rather than the functional basis of the social work profession, and Hoehler’s views on recent US elections and foreign policy is also included. George Haynes, Joe Hoffer, and Jerry Voorhis are prominent correspondents. The ICSW constitution is included as well.
 
Correspondence and Papers, October-December, 1949 Box 67, Folder 654
Note ICSW executive committee minutes contain discussions re approval of the constitution, reports about each of the national committees, the budget, publications, and plans for future general meetings. Minutes of the US Committee contain material re the budget, the committee’s relations with ICSW, relations with Latin American countries, and ICSW executive committee meetings. Correspondence re the US Committee’s membership drive and fund-raising efforts is also included. Joe Hoffer and Jane Hoey are correspondents.
Box 68
Correspondence and Papers, 1950 Box 68, Folder 655 to 656
Note US Committee minutes and reports include information about fund-raising, membership, and social welfare trends and programs in different countries. Other material contains information re the proposed revision of the TCSW constitution, proposed projects for the Conference, the functions and organizational status of the US Committee, inviting old Conference members living in Communist controlled countries to Conference meetings, support of UNICEF, and plans for the impending 5th International Conference in Paris. A list of US delegates to the Paris meeting is included. Joe Hoffer, Melvin A. Glasser, David Holbrook, Jane Hoey, Herbert Emmerich, Ruth Williams, and George Haynes are correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1951 Box 68, Folder 657 to 658
Note ICSW executive and permanent committee minutes, US Committee minutes, and correspondence between Hoffer and Haynes deal with ICSW relations with the UN, fund-raising and finances (including the US Committee’s efforts to have the ICSW included in community chest drives), and the reorganization of the US Committee and its semi-autonomous status within the National Conference of Social Work. ICSW cooperation with International organizations, the ICSW constitution, activities of the various national committees, plans for future Conference meetings, and the goals of the ICSW are also discussed. Joe Hoffer, George Haynes, Ruth Williams, Loula Dunn, and Harry Carey are correspondents. The Lessing J. Rosenwald Foundation, China, and the American Red Cross are mentioned.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1952 Box 68, Folder 659 to 660
Note Folders contain detailed information re the purpose, membership, organization, budget, and program of ICSW. US Committee material includes an agenda, the proposed constitution, and a proposed agreement between the US Committee and the National Social Welfare Assembly. Correspondence re fund-raising (particularly in relation to the 6th International Conference in Madras), a booklet entitled "The Role of Social Services in Raising the Standard of Living," and a membership list of the US delegation to the Madras conference are also included. Agnes Myer, Joe Hoffer, and Ruth Williams are correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1953 Box 68, Folder 661
Note ICSW executive committee minutes deal with funding, relations with the UN, and past and future general Conference meetings. Folder also contains material re the US Committee’s program committee, finance committee, nominating committee, and fund-raising. A National Social Welfare Assembly memorandum is included. Joe Hoffer, George Rabinoff, and Ruth Williams are correspondents.
Box 69
Correspondence and Papers, 1954 Box 69, Folder 662 to 663
Note ICSW executive and permanent committee minutes, US Committee minutes, and correspondence contain material re ICSW finances, guidelines for national committees, past and future Conference meetings, relations with the UN, the revised ICSW constitution, and ICSW history, purpose, membership, officers, program, and budget. Folders also contain report of ICSW secretary-general, reports of regional ICSW secretariats and offices, a joint agreement between the US Committee and the National Social Welfare Assembly, progress report of the New England Committee of ICSW, minutes of the Canadian Conference on Social Work business meeting, and US Committee membership lists (organized geographically). Charles Ascher, Joe Hoffer, George Rabinoff, and Ruth Williams are correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1955 Box 69, Folder 664
Note US Committee minutes and correspondence contain material re the 7th and 8th International Conferences, ICSW and US Committee finances, membership promotion, the New England Committee of ICSW, nominees for election to the US Committee, labor’s interest in the 8th International Conference theme (industrialization and social work), and the joint agreement between the US Committee and the National Social Welfare Assembly. Folder also includes a UN Bureau of Social Affairs report re family and child welfare and UNICEF and a list of ICSW members in the US. A National Social Welfare Assembly statement of facts and recommendations re international social welfare issues discusses the UN, UNICEF, the UN Expanded Technical Assistance Plan, a social welfare attache program, immigration, and the international exchange of persons. Ralph Blanchard, Lester Granger, Joe Hoffer, Robert MacRae, and George Rabinoff are correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1956 Box 69, Folder 665
Note ICSW executive committee minutes, US Committee minutes, and correspondence deal with ICSW finances and budget, plans for the 8th and 9th International Conferences (including US participation in the 8th meeting at Munich), ICSW relations with the UN and other international organizations, Conference projects, ICSW constitutional amendments, and nominees for election to the US Committee. A summary of the 8th International Conference, lists of US registrants for the Munich conference, and an agenda for a National Conference of Social Work session on international social welfare are also included. Lester Granger, Jane Hoey, and Ruth Williams are correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1957-1964 Box 69, Folder 666
Note US Committee minutes and correspondence contain a proposed constitution for the US Committee, US Committee financial reports and membership lists, a special report on the future of the ICSW, and material re the 9th, 10th, llth, 12th, and 13th International Conferences. A letter from Melvin A. Glasser acknowledges Hoehler’s past contributions to the US Committee. Charles Schottland and the Pan American Conference of Social Work are mentioned.
 
5th International Conference, 1950 Box 69, Folder 667
Note Folders include papers entitled "The Place of Social Work Within the Large Public and Voluntary Social Services," "Relations Between Public Bodies and Voluntary Social Organizations in the Sphere of Social Work," "Contribution of International Conference of Social Work to Social Progress," and "Perspectives on the Future of Social Work." Material on social work in Germany and the United States, replies to a questionnaire re the value of the ICSW, a memorandum re social welfare trends in different countries, and miscellaneous notes and bills are also included.
Box 70
6th International Conference, 1950 Box 70, Folder 668
Note (continued from previous folder)
 
6th International Conference, 1952 Box 70, Folder 669
Note Manual provides information re Indian culture, UN operations in Asia, the Point IV program in Asia, and social welfare in the US.
 
International Film Bureau, 1949-1963 Box 70, Folder 670
Note Agendas for board of directors meetings, financial reports, a list of shareholders, a proposal for a public service film board, and press releases.
 
Joint Army and Navy Committee on Welfare and Recreation  
Box 70
Correspondence and Papers, 1938-September, 1941 Box 70, Folder 671
Note Folder includes minutes of the subcommittee on education, recommendations re extended educational opportunities for soldiers, suggestions re organization for a morale program, an outline of functions and duties of morale officers, recommendations concerning the work of hostesses, proposals for entertainment tours, and a memorandum from Louis Wirth re the "morale problem." Membership lists of the religious activities, athletics, music, and other subcommittees are also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, October-December, 1941 Box 70, Folder 672
Note A proposal for tbe publication of a booklet explaining soldiers’ civil rights, a draft of a section on community relations for a morale officers manual, a proposed plan for voluntary education among servicemen, and a speech on the war effort by Malcolm MacDonald.
 
Correspondence and Papers, January-April, 1942 Box 70, Folder 673
Note Minutes of the subcommittee on music, the committee’s recommendations re the collection of gifts for soldiers, an evaluation of the USD in the western and southwestern US, a report on a tour of army camps and naval stations, and a proposal for a music project. Folder also contains memoranda re the functions of the committee, a committee visit to San Diego, and county welfare departments’ community services. A list of communities affected by defense establishments is included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, May-August, 1942 Box 70, Folder 674
Note Folder contains memoranda, correspondence, and papers re the appointment of persons to the Army Specialist Corps, the extension of recreational overseas services, a study of the Army court martial system in relation to soldier morale, government allowances for the dependents of soldiers, mobilizing wartime community services, the marital status of army men, discrimination against Negro women in the WAC, and typical life in a southern US Army camp. A speech, "Cities: Defenders of Democracy," and an article by Hoehler, "Service for Men in the Armed Forces," are also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, September-December, 1942 Box 70, Folder 675
Note Committee minutes; minutes of the Committee of Trustees on Defense, Welfare, and Experimental Programs; and correspondence, memoranda, and papers re the prevention of venereal disease and prostitution, the study of court martial systems in relation to soldier morale, committee visits to camps in Virginia and North Carolina, suggestions for demobilization, racial segregation in the armed services, and revision of the committee’s membership. Arthur Page, Raymond D. Fosdick, and Francis Keppel are correspondents. A guide for physical training and athletics is also included.
Box 71
Correspondence and Papers, September-December, 1942 Box 71, Folder 676
Note (continued from previous folder)
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1943 Box 71, Folder 677
Note Folder contains material re government allowances to servicemen’s families, a workshop on sports, and the variety of volunteer jobs supporting the war effort. Hoehler’s resignation from the committee, subcommittee membership lists, and a report en­titled "An Appreciation of Education in the British Army" are included as well.
 
Library of International Relations, 1947-1962 Box 71, Folder 678 to 679
Note Correspondence, annual reports, minutes of governing members and trustees meetings, and clippings deal with fund-raising, the library’s history and use, proposed affiliation with the University of Illinois, forums, and a proposed business institute on world economic problems. Drafts from the proposed Encyclopedia of International Affairs are also included. Eloise Requa is a major correspondent.
 
Mental Health Society of Greater Chicago  
Box 71
Correspondence and Papers, 1957-March, 1958 Box 71, Folder 680
Note Correspondence, minutes, financial reports, and related papers deal with the establishment in 1958 of the Mental Health Society of Greater Chicago as a separate entity from the Illinois Association for Mental Health. The society’s purposes, organization, and functions are discussed. Correspondence involves Linn Brandenburg, Robert MacRae, and Bernice Van der Vries; the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, the Community Fund of Chicago, and National Mental Health Week, are mentioned.
 
Correspondence and Papers, April-December, 1958 Box 71, Folder 681 to 682
Note Correspondence, bylaws, minutes, and newspaper clippings reflect the continuing work to organize the society, particularly the election of officers and selection of the board of directors and an executive director. Mental Health Week, the history of the Illinois Society for Mental Health, fundraising, and the Women’s Advertising Club of Chicago are discussed. Rudolph Novick, Gerald M. O’Conner, and Mrs. Charles Howard Requa are involved in correspondence.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1959 Box 71, Folder 683
Note Correspondence, treasurers’ reports, and board of directors and executive committee minutes contain material re the society’s program, fund-raising, finances, and educational services. Bylaws, clippings, lists of foundation donations as well as the society’s board of directors, and a proposal for a community organization plan in mental health services are also included. Robert Farwell and Mrs. Charles Howard Requa are mentioned.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1960-1961 Box 71, Folder 684
Note Correspondence, annual progress reports, board of directors and executive committee minutes, memoranda, and clippings deal with the society’s finances, legislative program, membership, and fund-raising. Affiliation with both the Illinois and National Associations for Mental Health, the Stratton administration’s neglect of the mentally ill, and the appointment of a new executive director for the society are also discussed. A report of the Indiana Association for Mental Health entitled "Jailing of the Mentally Ill in Indiana in 1959" and a paper re a planning, research, and action program for emotionally disturbed and mentally ill children are included. Robert Farwell is a prominent correspondent.
Box 72
Correspondence and Papers, 1962-1963 Box 72, Folder 685
Note Correspondence, memoranda, and minutes of the board of directors and public policy and legislation committee cover topics such as fund-raising, the society’s legislative program, the state’s program for improvement of existing mental institutions, Governor Kerner’s proposed budget cut for the Illinois Department of Mental Health, and the society’s support of a project on mental retardation. Press releases, a detailed description of the society’s program activities and duties of the staff, a report on the use of volunteers in mental hospitals, a list of foundations, and a membership list of the society’s board of directors are also included.
 
Metropolitan Club, 1947-1962 Box 72, Folder 686
Note Primarily correspondence re reservations and bills. Hoehler resigned his membership in protest against this Washington DC club’s policy of racial discrim­ination.
 
Mobilization for Human Needs, National Citizens Committee, 1934-1935 Box 72, Folder 687
Note Correspondence requesting Hoehler’s participation on the committee. Conference programs are included.
 
National Advisory Committee for the National Survey of Salaries and Working Conditions in Social Work, 1948-1952 Box 72, Folder 688 to 690
Note Jointly sponsored by the National Council on Social Work Education and the National Social Welfare Assembly and conducted in cooperation with the federal government, the survey was designed to gather information on the status of social work personnel. Minutes, correspondence, and memoranda detail the planning and execution of the survey. David G, French, John H. Moore, Harry Carey, Pat Tompkins, and T. E. Wintersteen are correspondents. Completed questionnaires re Illinois social workers are included.
 
National Association for Mental Health, 1952-1958, 1962 Box 72, Folder 691
Note Comprised largely of memoranda, the folder also contains annual meeting minutes and programs, executive committee minutes, financial information, and the NAMH bylaws. A paper entitled "A Study of Administration of State Psychiatric Services" is also included.
 
National Citizens Commission for Public Schools  
Box 72
Correspondence and Papers, 1949-1950 Box 72, Folder 692
Note Detailed information re the formation of the commission. Formally launched in 1949 with a six year charter, this organization of laymen hoped to stimulate public interest in public schools, thereby improving the quality of education and concomitantly strengthening American democracy. Folder also includes a commission report on the secondary and elementary schools (enrollment, salaries, facilities, finances, etc.), a report on the commission’s teachers training committee, and material from workshop discussion groups.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1950 Box 72, Folder 693
Note Discussions re progressive and traditional education, a statement from the National Council of Independent Schools re the functions of secondary education, a commission report on public schools (enrollment, salaries, facilities, finances, etc. are discussed), a report re citizens’ committee activities in New Jersey, statements about the role of the better school campaign during the Korean War, and an article entitled “Why Young People Leave School.’ Membership lists, committee lists, and a progress report are also included.
Box 73
Correspondence and Papers, 1951 Box 73, Folder 694
Note An agenda and list of organizations attending commission meeting. A progress report re the commission committee on teachers is also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1952 Box 73, Folder 695
Note Material from commission meetings includes minutes, financial reports, summaries of commission activities and accomplishments, and reports of citizen group activities across the country. A report on the first Citizens Assembly on Education and material re various commission-sponsored conferences are also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1953 Box 73, Folder 696 to 697
Note Folders contain minutes from a commission meeting as well as from a combined trustees and "perpetuation of purpose" committee meeting. These minutes and related correspondence detail the consideration of the commission’s future, viz. whether it should continue beyond its designated six-year term, whether it should initiate the creation of a new organization with similar concerns, or whether it should simply terminate. Suggested articles for bylaws of a proposed successor organization, a financial report, material re conference arrangements, correspondence from R. C. Hoiles of Freedom Newspapers, Inc. challenging Hoehler to a debate re education, and an article entitled "Some Questions Laymen Ask" by Roy Larsen are also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1954 Box 73, Folder 698 to 701
Note Minutes of commission meetings, the public education finance committee, and the committee on reorganization (originally the committee on "perpetuation of the purpose"); executive director’s report; financial reports; staff reports; and suggested bylaws for the proposed successor organization, the National Citizens Council for Better Schools. Preceding material and related correspondence and papers deal primarily with the impending termination of the commission and the creation of a successor organization. Material re federal aid to public education, plans for workshops, and material from the Citizens Assembly on Education are also included. Beardsly Ruml appears in the folders.
Box 74
Correspondence and Papers, 1955 Box 74, Folder 702 to 704
Note Minutes of commission meetings and the reorganization committee, staff reports, and correspondence contain material re finances, bylaws, trustees and members, the history of the commission, steps leading to reorganization (1953-1955), the commission’s publication program (including Better Schools), the question of the commission’s issuing a statement on federal aid to education, and selection of officers for the succeeding organization. Folders also include a comparison of 1951 recommendations re the commission with accomplishments realized by 1955, the draft of a Delaware advisory committee report entitled "Obtaining Public Support for Public Education," reports from the White House Conference on Education (including summaries of state conference activities), and a speech by Leo Perlis on the national crisis in education.
 
National Citizens Council for Better Schools  
Box 74
Correspondence and Papers, January-May, 1956 Box 74, Folder 705 to 707
Note Folder contents reflect Largely on the termination of the NCCPS and the initial operation of the new council. Minutes from commission, council, and trustees meetings; staff reports; and correspondence accompany NCCRS bylaws and reports from a Citizen Assembly on Education workshops, a state leaders workshop, a roundtable meeting of national organizations interested in some aspect of education, and the midwest regional council meeting of NCCBS. The preceding material deals with finances, the selection of a name for the new organization, means for arousing public interest in education, the council’s publication program, teaching children the history of education, criticism of the NCCBSTs alleged slow beginning (particularly the extended search for a new chairman), a pro­posed program for NCCBS, and the purpose, origin, support, officers, committees, and members of NCCBS.
 
Correspondence and Papers, May-December, 1956 Box 74, Folder 708
Note Annual report, revised bylaws, trustees minutes, minutes of the regional council meetings, staff reports, an audit, state leaders workshop reports, and correspondence discuss the council’s purpose, financial support, publication program (particularly Better Schools) , educational television, racial segregation in schools, a training program for education "ambassadors," the Westinghouse Broadcasting Corporation supported radio program produced by NCCBS ("Spotlight on Schools"), activities of the different state groups, and the desirable extent of citizen participation in educational policy making. Folders also include a speech entitled "What Is Needed in School Reporting," a report entitled "Business and Industry Contribution to Better Schools," the First Interim Report of the President’s Committee on Education Beyond the High School, organizational charts of NCCBS, vitae of council members, and a detailed history of the Round Table of National Organization.
Box 75
Correspondence and Papers, May-December, 1956 Box 75, Folder 709 to 710
Note (continued from previous folder)
 
Correspondence and Papers, January-April, 1957 Box 75, Folder 711
Note Annual meeting report, minutes of a regional council meeting, committee reports, and correspondence contain a discussion of the council’s purpose, a treasurer’s report, information re regional council meetings, and appraisals of the council’s work. A membership list, statistics re school district reorganization in midwestern states, material from NCCBS workshops, and histories of the Iowa and Nebraska Councils for Better Education are also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, April-June, 1957 Box 75, Folder 712
Note Folder contains audits, board of trustees agenda and minutes, and reports re the western regional state leaders workshop, the North Atlantic regional council meeting, Better Schools, and a staff workshop on implementing the council’s program.
 
Correspondence and Papers, June-September, 1957 Box 75, Folder 713
Note A staff report, a request to the Sears Roebuck Foundation for funds, and a collection of materials re the council’s goals, finances, personnel, newspaper (Better Schools) and history. Correspondence re arrangements for the impending Conference on the American High School is also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, September-November, 1957 Box 75, Folder 714
Note Bulk of folder is related to the Conference on the American High School, a meeting sponsored in part by NCCBS and featuring James B. Conant. Material also contains discussion of membership policies, a report on educational television, and a history of a state education committee in South Dakota.
Box 76
Correspondence and Papers, November-December, 1957 Box 76, Folder 715
Note Folder includes a financial statement, a report of the membership committee, information re the program and personnel of state education committees, information re the National School Boards Association, a script from the NCCBS radio program "Spotlight on Schools," vitae of trustees and council members, correspondence re the current public school situation, material re racial segregation outside of the South, and reference to President Eisenhower’s "call to arms" on behalf of American schools. A speech by Henry Toy on the future of education and the need for teachers to test new ideas and practices re teaching, mention of the National Education Association, and a manual for council mem­bers that deals with the council’s history, finances, functions, organizations, and the role of members are also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, January, 1958 Box 76, Folder 716
Note Detailed material re the annual meeting includes president’s and chairman’s reports, committee reports, financial statements, and trustees minutes. Folder also includes a "Proposal for Financing Tax Supported Education" by Robert Heller and Heller’s speech delivered upon his inauguration as NCCBS chairman. Amended bylaws, council membership list, and Hoehler’s recommendations re criteria for council membership are also in the folder.
 
Correspondence and Papers, January-March, 1958 Box 76, Folder 717
Note Folder contains staff workshop papers, discussions of criteria for council membership and fund-raising matters, reference sheets for members’ use in evaluating proposed NCCBS concensus statements, an outline of procedures for adopting consensus statements, and discussions re arrangements for public meetings featuring James B. Conant as the speaker.
 
Correspondence and Papers, April-May, 1958 Box 76, Folder 718
Note Trustee’s minutes, midwest regional council meeting report, and staff workshops reports contain committee reports and discussions of NCCBS’s publications, radio show, regional services, etc. Bulk of correspondence is related to arrangements for Illinois meetings with James Conant. Bill Butterfield, regional NCCBS director, is a prominent correspondent.
 
Correspondence and Papers, May-June, 1958 Box 76, Folder 719
Note Folder includes minutes of a western regional council meeting, a statement of 1957 NCCBS highlights, a report on Better Schools, a schedule of Conant’s activities in relation to his study of the American high school, a log of NCCBS events, and a speech by Henry Toy entitled "First Rate Schools, and Quality Students." Material re a consensus statement issued by NCCBS on legislation and curriculum and a profile of NCCBS members (information broken down by region, sex, age, occupation, etc.) are also contained in the folder.
 
Correspondence and Papers, June-August, 1958 Box 76, Folder 720
Note Trustees minutes, a detailed financial report, and an appraisal of the council’s role in light of recent educational changes are contained in the folder. The council’s consensus statements, membership recommendations, and James Conant’s study of the high school are mentioned.
 
Correspondence and Papers, August-December, 1958 Box 76, Folder 721
Note Folder contains council’s consensus statements on legislation and curriculum, standards for citizens committees, financing education, unity in education, and schools and the international crisis. Proposed bylaws, a proposed program for the council, material from a regional NCCBS meeting, an issue of Vital Issues, and a discussion of fund-raising (Sears Roebuck Foundation mentioned) are also included. Bill Butterfield is a subject and correspondent.
Box 77
Correspondence and Papers, January-February, 1959 Box 77, Folder 722
Note Trustees minutes, staff-member workshop material, and correspondence and papers deal with the proposed reorganization and centralization of the council. Detailed financial statements and discussion of NCCBS publications, the radio program, and effective work with state committees are also included. Folder contains as well a speech by Roy Larsen entitled "The Future Must Be Earned."
 
Correspondence and Papers, March-August, 1959 Box 77, Folder 723
Note Folder contains a NCCBS vice-chairman’s critical evaluation of the council, information re the Advertising Council’s efforts on behalf of better education, material from a state leaders workshop on improving state citizens committees, an audit, and a NCCBS staff member’s speech on teacher tenure.
 
Correspondence and Papers, August-December, 1959 Box 77, Folder 724
Note Trustee’s minutes, memoranda, and correspondence detail the dissolution of NCCBS and the proposal for a new organization concerned not with eliciting state citizen interest, but with increasing public understanding.
 
National Committee on Immigration and Citizenship, 1955-1957 Box 77, Folder 725
Note Limited correspondence re the organization of the committee and recruitment of members.
 
National Conference on Social Welfare  
Box 77
Correspondence and Papers, 1947-1949 Box 77, Folder 726
Note Correspondence urging a study of the possibility of a merger between the Conference and the American Association of Social Workers. Leonard W. Mayo, NCSW president, and Donald S. Howard, AASW president, are involved in the correspondence with Hoehler. The National Social Welfare Assembly is mentioned.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1951 Box 77, Folder 727
Note Folder contains a joint NCSW and National Social Welfare Assembly committee report on issues to receive forum consideration by the two organizations in future years. Material re nominations for NCSW officers and committees is also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1952 Box 77, Folder 728
Note Report re NCSW nominations for officers and committees accompanies material on arrangements for the approaching 79th annual meeting. Folder includes an address by Alan Valentine on the democratic ideal in the contemporary world. Adlai Stevenson is mentioned.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1953-1962 Box 77, Folder 729
Note Primarily correspondence re arrangements for the annual meetings. Three papers entitled "An Approach to Determining Caseload Norms," "How Physical and Social Welfare Planning Can Work Together," and "Has the Structure of Social Work Become Outmoded?" (by Agnes E. Myer) are also included. Ella Reed is a correspondent.
 
National Information Bureau, 1948-1949 Box 77, Folder 730
Note Folder contains material re the bureau’s relations with the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis and the National Society for Crippled Children and Adults.
 
New World Foundation  
Box 77
Board of Directors, 1954-1957 Box 77, Folder 731
Note The New World Foundation was created to administer the trust fund of Anita McCormick Blaine; Hoehler served as a consultant. Folder contains primarily memoranda to the board expressing Hoehlerfs recommendations re policy, procedure, and areas of work for the foundation’s future operation. Occasional mention of applications for grants and project proposals is included.
Box 78
Board of Directors, Grant Proposals, 1955-1956 Box 78, Folder 732 to 733
Note Folders consist of Hoehler’s report made to the board of directors re applications for New World Foundation funds. The proposed projects are described; occasional replies to the applicants are also included.
 
Trustees, 1954 Box 78, Folder 734
Note Folder contains excerpts from the first trustee meeting at which the decision to hire Hoehler as consultant was made; several memoranda reporting Hoehler’s activities during his first months of work with the foundation are also included.
 
Consultant’s Report to Board of Directors, 1955 Box 78, Folder 735 to 737
Note Material discusses the areas designated by Elaine as those in which projects are to be funded: education for children, ethics in relation to industry and commerce, public health, communication with the unseen world, international relations and peace, and the growth of spiritual life. Hoehler’s report interprets these six areas and summarizes work being done by others in these fields as well as what could be done. References to specific projects are included.
 
Richard Bentley, 1954-1956 Box 78, Folder 738 to 739
Note Correspondence re the employment of Hoehler, Hoehler’s activities as consultant, reports to the board of directors, and projects proposed to the foundation.
 
Mrs. Gilbert A. Harrison, 1954-1956 Box 78, Folder 740
Note Correspondence re Hoehler’s activities as consultant and discussion of projects proposed to the foundation.
 
Roger I. Lee, 1954-1955 Box 78, Folder 741
Note Limited correspondence re Hoehler’s activities as consultant and projects proposed to the foundation.
 
Katherine Taylor, 1954-1956 Box 78, Folder 742
Note Correspondence re Hoehler’s activities as consultant and projects proposed to the foundation, Taylor also worked as a consultant for the New World Foundation.
Box 79
Chicago Agencies, 1954-1955 Box 79, Folder 743
Note Correspondence from Chicago area organizations interested in receiving funds from the New World Foundation.
 
Confidential Correspondence, 1954-1956 Box 79, Folder 744
Note Private and confidential exchanges with persons, many of them Hoehler’s friends who were interested in receiving funds from the foundation. Sherwood Eddy, Joel Hunter, Walter H. C. Laves, Leonard Mayo, C. M. Pierce, J. B. Rhine, Donald C. Stone, and Leo Szilard are among the correspondents.
 
Foundations, 1954-1956 Box 79, Folder 745
Note Correspondence primarily seeking advice and information about establishing a foundation.
 
Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1951-1957, 1961 Box 79, Folder 746 to 748
Note Primarily material from persons and organizations interested in receiving grants from the foundation. Conrad Van Hyning of the American Social Hygiene Association and Bertram Beck are correspondents.
 
Reimbursement Vouchers, 1954-1957 Box 79, Folder 749 to 750
Note Financial records re Hoehler’s salary and expenses.
 
Office of Foreign Relief and Rehabilitation Operations (OFRRO)  
Box Legal 90
Correspondence and Papers, 1940-1945 Box Legal 90, Folder 3 to 4
Note Folders contain correspondence and papers generated during Hoehler’s work for OFRRO in North Africa and his tenure as chief of the London OFRRO office. Material deals with the plans for transferring refugees from Spain to North Africa, the care of civilians in war-devastated North African countries (particularly Tunisia), and planning for the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration. Articles and memoranda entitled "Cooperation for Relief," "Planning for Post-War Relief and Rehabilitation," "OFRRO in North Africa," "Economic Aspects of Relief and Rehabilitation," "Background of Relief in Liberated Europe," and "How Should We Deal with Germany After the War to Win the Peace" are included. A memorandum re the role of US voluntary welfare organizations in international relief work is contained in these folders as well.
 
Progress Reports, 1943 Box Legal 90, Folder 5
Note Reports sent to the OFRRO director and US Secretary of State reflect many daily activities and concerns of the London OFRRO office. Material is comprised primarily of discussions re means for determining relief needs and securing and distributing supplies to European countries. The need for the development of a manual to guide relief work in liberated countries, plans for the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, and efforts to develop international relief work are also discussed. Herbert H. Lehman is a correspondent.
Box 80
Pennsylvania State Alumni Association, 1948-1963 Box 80, Folder 751
Note Correspondence re class reunions and elections of trustees.
 
Puerto Rican Study, 1959-1962 Box 80, Folder 752 to 753
Note Material stemming from Hoehler’s brief term of work in Puerto Rico as a consultant on institutional care for predelinquent youth. Background material, final reports, and comments include Hoehler’s remarks about penology. Folders also include information re a communications research institute.
 
Survey Associates  
Box 80
Correspondence and Papers, 1946-1947 Box 80, Folder 754
Note Correspondence primarily re fund-raising for Survey Graphic and Survey Midmonthly. Some discussion of an issue on segregation is also included. Paul Kellogg, Beulah Burhoe, Anita McCormick Elaine, and Harold H. Swift are subjects or correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1948 Box 80, Folder 755
Note Board of directors minutes, budgets, and correspondence deal with the severe financial crisis facing Survey Associates. Paul Kellogg, Joseph P. Chamberlain, George Britt, Thomas Devine, Eduard C. Lindeman, and Harold H. Swift are among those discussing the plausibility of continuing publication.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1949-1950 Box 80, Folder 756
Note Board of directors minutes, executive committee minutes, budget figures, business manager’s report, and correspondence deal with the board of directors’ decision to continue publication, but to publish one magazine rather than two. A report by Hoehler on the annual American Public Welfare Association round table conference is also included. George Britt is a correspondent.
 
Correspondence and Papers, 1951-1952 Box 80, Folder 757
Note Limited correspondence involves Bishop Shell, Kathryn Close, and Joseph P. Chamberlain as correspondents or subjects.
 
Survey Committee on Displaced Persons, 1945-1947 Box 80, Folder 758
Note Composed of representatives from voluntary associations, the committee discussed the Intergovernmental Committee on Refugees, the United Nations Organization, forced repatriation, the care of the permanently disabled, the difficulty of placing refugees in new countries, and the role of voluntary agencies in arranging for the relocation and settlement of displaced persons. Minutes, subcommittee reports, and final recommendations detail these consideration. Articles, a radio program transcript, and Hoehler’s booklet, Europe’s Homeless Millions (published by the Foreign Policy Association), are also included.
 
United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA)  
Box Legal 90
Correspondence and Papers, 1943-June, 1944 Box Legal 90, Folder 6
Note Information re the formation, financing, and policy development of UNRRA. Folder also contains material re the termination of the Office of Foreign Relief and Rehabilitation Operations, efforts to collect food and supplies for relief distribution, the displaced persons camps, UNRRA’s relation to the military, the formation of an UNRRA organization in the Far East, and personnel arrangements. An article by George Soloveytchik is included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, July-October, 1944 Box Legal 90, Folder 7
Note Correspondence between Hoehler in the London office and Thomas M. Cooley, II, of the Washington, DC office details much of the daily activity of the UNRRA officials. Cooperation with the military, the role of Russians in UNRRA relief work, friction between different divisions of UNRRA, personnel problems, the need for a substantial increase in personnel, and the role of the Red Cross, are discussed. Memoranda on displaced persons in Italy, the repatriation of French war prisoners, the planning before "D" Day are also included. The possibility of John Steinbeck making a film about displaced persons is discussed, Herbert H. Lehman is a correspondent.
 
Correspondence and Papers, November, 1944-January, 1945 Box Legal 90, Folder 8
Note Folder contains correspondence between Hoehler and Thomas M. Cooley, II, discussing many daily official activities, personnel problems, and the recruitment and training of personnel. Correspondence with T. T. Scott and others concerns UNRRA’s relation with the military. Other material includes official drafts of statements defining eligibility requirements for UNRRA service, the quality of care to be delivered, etc.; a memorandum re Republican refugees from the Spanish civil war; information re the role of voluntary welfare societies in the interna­tional relief effort; a proposal for a commission on the rehabilitation of cities; and allegations that UNRRA was a "Jewish organization."
 
Correspondence and Papers, February-April, 1945 Box Legal 90, Folder 9
Note Articles, memoranda, press conference transcripts, field reports, etc. deal with conditions in postwar Europe, the relations between UNRRA and the military, transportation plans for displaced persons, the history of UNRRA, the role of voluntary agencies in UNRRA relief efforts, the need for improved interagency communication and public relations, personnel problems, and daily activities of UNRRA assembly centers. Herbert H. Lehman, Charles P. Taft, Gertrude Springer, and Pierce Williams are correspondents and authors. A letter describing Jewish women attending their first religious ceremony in five years is also included.
 
Correspondence and Papers, May-June, 1945 Box Legal 90, Folder 10
Note Folder contains a detailed repatriation handbook based on the repatriation of Yugoslavs, a report on the repatriation of Polish Jews, a program from the World Conference of Polish Jewry, and a bulletin containing news of displaced persons operations In Europe and the Middle East. Other material deals with the reorganization of UNRRA headquarters, the care of displaced children, UNRRA’s relation to the military, and health and medical concerns in the Far East.
Box Legal 91
Correspondence and Papers, July, 1945 Box Legal 91, Folder 11
Note Material concerns UNRRA’s relation to the military, the reorganization and decentralization of the European Regional Office of UNRRA, instructions for mission reports to the regional office, policies for Far Eastern displaced persons opera­tions, and conditions facing Jews in Germany. Folder also contains an Intergovernmental Committee on Refugees report on plans for refugees in France, minutes of the Standing Technical Subcommittee on Displaced Persons for Europe, detailed reports on visits to displaced persons camps, reports from UNRRA offices in Europe and Australia, and drafts of a multilateral agreement re European displaced persons of uncertain nationality. The American Council of Voluntary Agencies for Foreign Service is mentioned.
 
Correspondence and Papers, August, 1945 Box Legal 91, Folder 12
Note Bulk of material stems from the UNRRA third council session; material includes council minutes, policy resolutions, minutes of the committee of the Council for the Far East, an address by director general Herbert H. Lehman, and a statement submitted by the American Jewish Conference, the World Jewish Congress, and the Board of Deputies of British Jews. Other material deals with UNRRA’s relation to the military and the central tracing office.
 
Correspondence and Papers, September-November, 1945 Box Legal 91, Folder 13
Note Folder includes a detailed report on current displaced persons operations, a report on a visit to displaced persons assembly centers and camps, a survey of displaced persons’ housing winterization requirements, detailed directives to displaced persons operations, a proposal for a pri vate International organization for peace and security, a proposed exchange of professional welfare information between the USSR, and the US, a statement of UNRRA responsibilities in the American zone of Germany, information re the treatment of anti-Nazis and Jews in Germany, a proposal for an international social welfare commission, an analysis of a Life editorial critical of UNRRA, a memorandum re Polish persons in China, and statements of European relief needs.
 
Correspondence and Papers, December, 1945 Box Legal 91, Folder 14
Note Material includes detailed reports of displaced persons operations, Herbert H. Lehman’s acceptance of Hoehler’s resignation, farewell letters to Hoehler, the UNRRA agreement with China, a statement of UNRRA responsibilities in Austria and Germany, a memorandum re Jewish psychological problems in displaced persons camps, and "A Call to Action" written by the Social Workers Emergency Committee. Polder also contains memoranda and papers re Russian displaced persons in Europe, the need for modified US immigration regulations and UNRRA personnel needs.
 
Correspondence and Papers, January-April, 1946 Box Legal 91, Folder 15
Note Folder contains farewell letters to Hoehler after his resignation from UNRRA, a transcript of a radio panel on UNRRA, speeches re Europe’s critical food shortage, and a statement of Fiorello LaGuardia upon succeeding Lehman as director general of UNRRA. Herbert Lehman is a correspondent.
 
Correspondence and Papers, May-August, 1946 Box Legal 91, Folder 16
Note Material from the fourth and fifth sessions of the UNRRA council includes minutes of a plenary meeting, policy statements re supply operations, and reports of director general LaGuardia. Folder also contains a detailed report on postwar conditions in China, correspondence re personnel and organizational changes in UNRRA, an analysis of personnel requirements of an UNRRA team, the termination of UNRRA, reports re the food crisis in Europe, a statistical report on the repatriation of displaced per­sons* and memoranda re the need to incorporate displaced persons in the management of displaced persons camps.
 
Correspondence and Papers, September, 1946-March, 1948 Box Legal 91, Folder 17
Note Folder contains a detailed history of displaced persons and the military’s and UNRRA’s programs of care for them. News of UNRRA1s personnel and organizational changes, a memorandum re the misuse of UNRRA supplies, a detailed analysis of UNRRA administrative and personnel problems, a memorandum re the progress of repatriation efforts, and health statistics on displaced persons are also included. Articles entitled "Can the UN Maintain Peace?" and "Why the DP’s Can’t Wait" accompany the preceding material. Charles Alspach and Fiorello LaGuardia are correspondents.
 
Correspondence and Papers, April, 1948-1953 Box Legal 91, Folder 18
Note Material discusses progress of repatriation efforts, the criticism and revision of US immigration regulations, problems of displaced Jewish persons, personnel and organizational changes in UNRRA, the termination of UNRRA, the incorporation of displaced persons into the management of displaced persons camps, and the prohibition of genocide. Pierce Williams’ correspondence re­ports on the Preparatory Commission for the International Refugee Organization meetings and other matters related to work for displaced persons; Joe R. Hoffer, Herbert H. Lehman, and Charles Alspach are also correspondents.
 
London Mission Journal, April, 1943 Box Legal 91, Folder 19
Note Journal records high-level discussions determining relief needs and exploring possible organizational arrangements for the provision of postwar relief and rehabilitation. The establishment of UNRRA is discussed.
Box Legal 92
Official Memoranda, circa 1945 Box Legal 92, Folder 20
Note Large compilation of documents re conditions and care of displaced persons. A section on voluntary agency services is included.
 
Newspaper Clippings, 1943-1950 Box Legal 92, Folder 21 to 23
Box 95
OFRRO / UNRRA Wartime Journal - original 1943-1945 Box 95, Folder 840
Note Original journal that Hoehler maintained while serving in North Africa and London with the Office of Foreign Relief and Rehabilitation Operations and then the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration during World War II.
Box 94
OFRRO / UNRRA Wartime Journal - transcript 1943-1945 Box 94, Folder 839
Note A typed transcription with explanatory commentary and copies of selected documents, created by his son, Fred Hoehler, Jr., in 1989.
Box 80
United Seamen’s Service, Inc., 1946-1948 Box 80, Folder 759
Note Correspondence, board of directors and trustees minutes, treasurer’s report, and bylaws. Some discussion re the service of seamen along the Great Lakes is included.
 
United States Committee for Refugees, 1959-1963 Box 80, Folder 760
Note Correspondence and memoranda contain suggestions re participation in World Refugee Year for youth, women’s clubs, governors’ commissions, and individual citizens. The executive director’s report, minutes of the third annual meeting, a list of national organizations cooperating in the World Refugee Year, a list of the committee’s national council members, information re refugee legislation, a description of projects for 1962, and newspaper clippings are also included.
Box 81
United States Committee for Refugees, 1959-1963 Box 81, Folder 761 to 762
Note (continued from previous folder)
 
University Club of Chicago, 1945-1960 Box 81, Folder 763
Note Primarily receipts and routine correspondence re election of new members.
 
University of Chicago Center for Programs in Government Administration Advisory Committee, 1958 Box 81, Folder 764
Note Folder contains a proposal for a program of professional studies in public administration.
 
University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration Visiting Committee, 1955-1961 Box 81, Folder 765
Note Committee minutes, reports, and memoranda re the school’s financial situation, curriculum, and plans for publication of a volume of essays on juvenile courts. Lists of the faculty’s publications, speeches, workshops, and consulting work are also included.
 
University of Illinois Citizens Committee, 1963-1964 Box 81, Folder 766
Note Material re the school’s budget and plans for higher education in Illinois, the university graduate and international service, and the trustee of public universities.
 
University of Illinois Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations Advisory Committee, 1957-1960 Box 81, Folder 767
Note Primarily lists of conferences and workshops given by the institute.
 
US Army, 1918 Box 81, Folder 768
Note Primarily material related to Hoehler’s service as an athletic director.
 
US Department of Labor Bureau of Employment Security  
Box 81
Federal Advisory Council, January-August, 1948 Box 81, Folder 769
Note Folder contains council minutes, historical information re the US Employment Service, proceedings from a training institute on counselling and selective placement, and information re the transfer of the US Employment Service to the Federal Security Agency to become part of the Bureau of Employment Security.
 
Federal Advisory Council, September, 1948 Box 81, Folder 770
Note Reports gathered from a council meeting deal with unemployment benefits, financing employ­ment security programs, temporary disability insurance, employment services and national security, labor disputes policy, agricultural labor, and veterans in the job market. Council membership lists are included.
Box 82
Federal Advisory Council, October, 1948-1951 Box 82, Folder 771
Note Council membership lists, resolutions adopted by the council, and the council’s report on unemployment entitled "Strengthening Unemployment Insurance." A report on overpayment and fraud in welfare departments, a speech on employ­ment trends, a memorandum from the US Secretary of Labor re the importation of labor, a paper re the need for the development of a good counseling program, and a memorandum re nondiscrimination in government contracts are also included.
 
Federal Advisory Council, 1952 Box 82, Folder 772
Note Correspondence re council meetings is accompanied by a staff paper entitled "Unemployment Insurance Benefits" and testimony re unemployment insurance given to a Congressional committee by Robert Goodwin. Material outlining the status and activities of state advisory councils, an analysis of the Bureau of Employment Security functions, charts re unemployment insurance statutory provisions, and a council membership list are also included.
 
Federal Advisory Council, 1953 Box 82, Folder 773 to 775
Note Minutes, staff papers, and annual reports deal with such topics as benefit financing, benefit adequacy, benefit disqualifications, minority policy, farm placement, veterans, state advisory councils, etc. Information re state unemployment insurance laws, the US Bureau of Employment Security’s programs, the council’s public sector members’ dissatisfaction with the council’s work, and the council’s revision of the "Functions and Procedures of the Federal Advisory Council on Employment Security." Testimony of the US Undersecretary of Labor before the House Ways and Means Committee re the use of unemployment tax funds is also included.
 
Federal Advisory Council, 1954 Box 82, Folder 776 to 777
Note Council minutes, membership lists, and reports on Bureau of Employment Security programs, farm placement, labor market development, employment security, employment service, the extension of the Federal Unemployment Tax Act, the functions and procedures of the Federal Advisory Council, intergovernmental relations, minority group policies, and fraud and improper unemployment insurance payments. Also included are several council minority reports and dissenting statements, particularly from the employer representatives .
Box 83
Federal Advisory Council, 1955 Box 83, Folder 778
Note Council minutes, membership lists, and reports on employment service, proposed legislation re unemployment insurance, the extension of the Federal Unemployment Tax Act, District of Columbia unemployment insurance laws, and unemployment benefits during disability. Summaries of regional office reports on legislative activity are also included.
 
Committee on Benefit Adequacy, 1949-1954 Box 83, Folder 789 to 781
Note Committee minutes and membership lists are accompanied by reports on duration and exhaustion of benefits, recent developments in employment security, objectives of and criteria for unemployment insurance, proposed study of benefit formulas, and strengthening unemployment insurance. Committee progress reports, committee recommendations and a staff report entitled "Adequacy of Benefits under Unemployment Insurance" are included. Council minutes and membership lists are also in these folders.
 
Unemployment Insurance Consultants, 1962-1963 Box 83, Folder 782
Note Correspondence is accompanied by detailed memoranda re revisions of state and federal unemployment insurance benefits and reconsiderations of policies affecting federal employees.
 
Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, 1948-1949 Box 83, Folder 783
Note Folder contains a study of the council’s purpose, scope, organization, finances, and relations with other organizations as well as minutes of board of directors meetings that consider the study’s recommendations. The council was formerly known as the Council of Social Agencies of Chicago.
 
World Federation for Mental Health, United States Committee, 1954-1964 Box 83, Folder 784
Note Annual meeting and executive committee minutes, reports, bylaws, memoranda, and correspondence deal with World Mental Health Year, the relationship of the US Committee to the Federation, committee membership, occupational mental health, and the history and accomplishments of the federation . Mrs. Charles S. Ascher, Frank Fremont-Smith, and Margaret Mead are correspondents and subjects.
 
National Citizens Committee for the World Health Organization, 1954-1957 Box 83, Folder 785
Note Limited material re the Midwest Conference on World Health and the location of the 10th World Health Assembly.
 
Young Men’s Christian Association, 1946-1958 Box 83, Folder 786
Note Limited material includes correspondence re the centennial celebration of both the YWCA and the YMCA, A YWCA memoranda re interracial experience is also included.
 
Series 5. Other Personal Papers, 1917-1965. (Boxes 84-87, Folders 787-813)  
Note Series 5, Other Personal Papers, contains material such as photographs of Hoehler, insurance records, expense accounts, dividend statements, and newspaper clippings.
Box 84
Appointment Books, 1946-1950 Box 84, Folder 787 to 791
Box 85
Appointment Books, 1951-1954 Box 85, Folder 792 to 795
 
Employment, 1935-1949 Box 85, Folder 796
Note Correspondence and papers deal primarily with proposals of and arrangements for jobs; Hoehler’s vitae and personal histories are included as well. Material re employment with the Chicago Community Fund, the Illinois Department of Public Welfare, the United Nations, the New World Foundation, the federal government, and miscellaneous city surveys is contained in these folders. Herbert H. Lehman and Adlai Stevenson are correspondents.
Box 86
Employment, 1950-1963 Box 86, Folder 797 to 798
Note (continued from previous folder)
 
Employment, United Nations, 1953-1955 Box 86, Folder 799
Note Correspondence and papers re a proposed short-term appointment for work in Israel.
 
Expense Accounts, 1950-1961 Box 86, Folder 800 to 805
Box 87
Insurance, 1915-1959, 1965 Box 87, Folder 806 to 808
Note Correspondence and papers re Hoehler’s personal life and auto insurance.
 
Investments, 1946-1962 Box 87, Folder 809 to 810
Note Correspondence and papers re Hoehler’s personal investments. Notification of dividend payments, stockholders meetings, etc. are included.
 
Travel, 1925, 1936-1959 Box 87, Folder 811 to 813
Note Primarily correspondence and papers surrounding Hoehler’s official travelling. Authorization vouchers, instructions, and some expense accounts are included. Hoehler’s passport is also contained in these folders.
Box 88
Newspaper Clippings, 1917-1953 Box 88, Folder 814 to 819
Box 89
Newspaper Clippings, 1953-1965 Box 89, Folder 820 to 825
Note (continued from previous folder)
Box Legal 92
Newspaper Clippings, 1943-1945 Box Legal 92, Folder 24 to 27
Note Primarily clippings re the war. Also included is material re the New York Herald Tribune’s forum on the "Responsibility of Victory"; Hoehler participated in the forum.
Box Flat 93
Scrapbook,  Box Flat 93, Folder
Box 96
Photographs 1910s-1960s Box 96
Note Photographs of Freh Hoehler, Herbert H. Lehman, Richard J. Daley, Harry Hopkins, Adlai Stevenson.
Box Legal 90
Miscellaneous Correspondence and Papers, 1942-1957 Box Legal 90, Folder 1 to 2
Note Contains oversized items separated from the main body of the collection, with separation sheets left to point to the location of these items. Correspondence from Pierce Williams gives detailed information re postwar European political conditions, the work and problems of the Preparatory Commission for the International Refugee Organization, the expulsion of German-speaking peoples from European countries, John Winant’s suicide, and Howard Knight’s death. Folders also contain papers by Nelson Cruikshank on deficiences in legislative provisions for economic security and labor views on social security, a speech by Herbert H. Lehman on amendments to the Refugee Relief Act, material re a legal suit against the Chicago Art Institute, a report by William Benton on cultural activities in the Soviet Union, and a statement of the Democratic legislative program for Illinois’ 70th General Assembly. Also included are galley proofs of an article by Hoehler on community organization and national defense, a comparative analysis of existing Illinois civil service statutes and proposed amendments, an article by John J. Corson on the future of social security, a speech by Bernard J. Shell on needed legislation for insurance of the country’s social and economic welfare, and Citizens of Greater Chicago proposals for revised legislation re the Chicago city council.